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[Bright] NVIDIA Project Denver is a 64-bit ARM Processor Architecture - Page 4

post #31 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Russian :D;12663583 
Here is a good way to put it.


ARM is really only going to be competitive in the mobile market.

ARM is a new architecture, I believe it started up sometime around 2001 (if my memory is correct). Intel has been designing since the mid 70s, and by 2001 intel had carved out a 70% desktop/server market share for itself.

The newest ARM architecture, A9 is supposed to have an IPC comparable to the original athlon processors for AMD and it features an out-of-order processing architecture. Future architectures will have as many as 4 ARM cores running at frequencies as high as 2.5 ghz, and the power projections for each of these is sub 1 watt. The efficiency of ARM can't be denied, and the performance gap between them and intel processors is rapidly closing. It is difficult at this point to say whether or not ARM will ever be as big as x86 or compete directly with x86 based processor in raw performance, but it is certainly possible. A lot of nay sayers don't realize that if ARM is destined for this kind of future it is very quickly approaching it.

Nvidia is probably looking to leverage ARM as a platform to support there TESLA GP-GPU. I personally don't think that Nvidia will be remarkably successful with this, this does give HPC and server owners more options in a market that is growing (in terms of options) for the first time in in a long time. In the same way that Nvidia is filling a market nitch with their TESLA GPU, ARM could also fill a similar nitch with efficient and powerful processors. Efficiency, cost of ownership, and price are all huge factors in the server market and ARM has many advantages in all these areas. I can think of many applications that could benefit from a move the ARM architecture assuming that future performance projections are accurate, and an IT and software infrastructure can be there to support it.
post #32 of 41
I work at a fortune 500 company, and the thousands of office desktops are still Intel netburst. Why? Well just last year a business case was put thru to replace every CRT monitor with an 23" LCD, saves power, saves money in the long run and has a Payback. Intel to this day hasn't developed a platform that a reputable company can build a business case to replace thier secretaries P4 computers. If these ARM processors are drawing miniscule power and get to a point where they can outperform a PentiumD I think Intel might as well close up shop cause they are done, most companies haven't mass upgraded their general office computers since netburst.
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post #33 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by regal View Post
I work at a fortune 500 company, and the thousands of office desktops are still Intel netburst. Why? Well just last year a business case was put thru to replace every CRT monitor with an 23" LCD, saves power, saves money in the long run and has a Payback. Intel to this day hasn't developed a platform that a reputable company can build a business case to replace thier secretaries P4 computers. If these ARM processors are drawing miniscule power and get to a point where they can outperform a PentiumD I think Intel might as well close up shop cause they are done, most companies haven't mass upgraded their general office computers since netburst.
Whaaaaat???? Since NETBURST?!!? There are Zacates and Atoms now. Whole desktops for secretaries that use only 30 watts total. There are plenty alternatives to Pentium D... your company just doesn't want to spend. Which is "okay" they can do what they want with their money.
post #34 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by rudypoochris View Post
Whaaaaat???? Since NETBURST?!!? There are Zacates and Atoms now. Whole desktops for secretaries that use only 30 watts total. There are plenty alternatives to Pentium D... your company just doesn't want to spend. Which is "okay" they can do what they want with their money.
He's saying the companies haven't spent money in years on pc hardware. I work for a large company (SallieMae) and they just recently switched from 5 year old p4 systems to 3 year old thin clients at a few locations and I don't see them spending money on new hardware anytime soon.
post #35 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by mothergoose729 View Post
ARM is a new architecture, I believe it started up sometime around 2001 (if my memory is correct). Intel has been designing since the mid 70s, and by 2001 intel had carved out a 70% desktop/server market share for itself.
2001? So the GBA's ARM7 processor was cutting edge stuff?

EDIT: Wiki says ARM has been around since the early 80's?
Edited by sLowEnd - 3/11/11 at 10:54am
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post #36 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by sLowEnd;12694666 
2001? So the GBA's ARM7 processor was cutting edge stuff?

EDIT: Wiki says ARM has been around since the early 80's?

Thats probably right, my mistake there.
post #37 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by rudypoochris View Post
Whaaaaat???? Since NETBURST?!!? There are Zacates and Atoms now. Whole desktops for secretaries that use only 30 watts total. There are plenty alternatives to Pentium D... your company just doesn't want to spend. Which is "okay" they can do what they want with their money.
Payback has to be less than 2 years (I think that is normal for USA companies which in itself it rediculous but that's another subject).

Would probably need 5W desktops for their to be a payback? My point is Intel ain't getting proven productivity improvements or energy savings paybacks since Netburst. And I think if the ARM's players do it right there is a huge market out there, that Intel has not been able to successfully penetrate in years.
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post #38 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by parityboy View Post
How many netbooks and tablets need 4GB+?
Not many, but give it two years maybe. Designing a new CPU for really any PC/laptop/tablet/phone market at this point that can't handle 64 bit would be downright foolish.
    
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post #39 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by regal View Post
My point is Intel ain't getting proven productivity improvements or energy savings paybacks since Netburst. And I think if the ARM's players do it right there is a huge market out there, that Intel has not been able to successfully penetrate in years.
This is probably due to the slow adoption by companies of anything after Windows XP. Soon though everyone is going to switch over to 7 or 8 which do require the more powerful processors. Intel has definitely improved their product considerably since Netburst, the reality is it really just doesn't take that much to Word process and do all of the basic tasks 95% of office workers need to do.

With the Intel Atom and now the AMD Zacate processors out offices can build 30W machines for all the normal employees - that is impressive. I have no issue running a server thats on 24/7 in my own house if it uses so little power. I wonder how much more power ARM can shave off because at this point the motherboard and RAM are consuming the same amount or sometimes more than the processor itself.
Edited by rudypoochris - 3/12/11 at 2:29am
post #40 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by rudypoochris View Post
This is probably due to the slow adoption by companies of anything after Windows XP. Soon though everyone is going to switch over to 7 or 8 which do require the more powerful processors. Intel has definitely improved their product considerably since Netburst, the reality is it really just doesn't take that much to Word process and do all of the basic tasks 95% of office workers need to do.
Exactly this, and both AMD and Intel are going to run into this problem more and more as the years go by. Unless there is a dramatic improvement in power consumption, there is quite simply no reason for businesses to upgrade to more powerful processors, since the applications running on the desktops don't require a lot of power anyway - unless they're based on Flash.

The same thing will happen in servers. Yes, the database server will require as many cores as possible, and a heavily hit Web server will require the same, but the truth is that most applications run in offices are not particularly CPU-intensive.

With the consolidation offered by virtualisation, it's really I/O and RAM which are the main requirements. If ARM can deliver, the likes of Intel and AMD may well see slower sales in the server space, simply because ARM does exactly what it needs to while not sucking up gobs of power.
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