post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maelthras View Post
Well it has the sheet, but it doesn't feel quite rubbery, it's smooth and takes alittle push to get the button. Probably since they are so old, and the domes have alittle pop to them. So it makes the key motion smooth and then it pops back up.
I suppose to someone who's never used a mechanical keyboard before, this keyboard probably does feel nice. I mean, I was once in this situation where I loved a few specific rubber dome keyboards which made it very difficult for anyone to convince me that a good mechanical keyboard is noticeably better.

Quote:
Originally Posted by HybridCore View Post
There's another word for a rubber sheet. I forgot what its called.
If you're thinking of "membrane", then that's certainly another word for it but it's not the correct terminology. In most rubber dome keyboards, there's a sheet of rubber that has all of the rubber domes molded into it, and then there's the membrane contact area that's kinda like a very thin and flimsy (and usually transparent) printed circuit board.

Some older rubber dome keyboards don't have a rubber sheet at all. Instead, there are individual rubber domes attached to each key. So when a key is removed, the rubber dome comes with it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Maelthras View Post
Well they are the same keyboard, so I always figurd they were the same, the one with the rubber sheet has alittle bit rounded snaps for the keys to pop into, makes it alittle more difficult to pop them up, but it's still smooth.
Those are the rubber domes on the rubber sheet.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Maelthras View Post
The other has individual domes on a plastic sheet, and those holes for the key locks are more square, they also snap out of place alot easier then the rounded type. The keyboard with the sqaure holes for the keys also it more complex, everything is screwed together and into everything else.
That's a design I haven't heard of yet, but that doesn't mean it's rare or anything.

Quote:
Originally Posted by runeazn View Post
thats why my liteon keyboard felt so nice..
i have a mxbrown and i say the liteon is great for a rubber dome,
i opened it and it has all little rubber domes.

i hate the pcb, a piece of 2mm or 1mm thick plastic..
Do you mean that there was an individual rubber dome attached to each key (that would come with the key if a key were removed) as opposed to having a big rubber sheet with a bunch of rubber domes molded into it?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Maelthras View Post
Yeah the individual rubber dome over plastic is pretty nice. The domes are actually glued down to the plastic sheet, alittle better then the rubber sheeted one. But both keyboards are very clicky when they were new, and sinstead of the spring they have the rubber bounce the key back up so they are responsive.
But "clicky" only refers to mechanical switches that make a mechanical click. There are three that I know of off hand that are clicky: the Cherry MX Blues, the White Alps, and of course the Buckling Springs. Rubber domes are tactile (but mushy) and non-clicky. I think what you're referring to is the keyboard's tactile feel.

And regarding springs vs. rubber: mechanical switches are actually much more responsive because they're spring-loaded. The purpose of the rubber dome design was to hopefully mimic tactile switches like the Buckling Springs. Unfortunately, nothing (and I mean nothing) can faithfully reproduce the feeling of real metal springs underneath the keys - especially in good tactile switches like the Buckling Springs, Cherry MX Browns, and Cherry MX Clears. Some rubber dome keyboards come relatively close, but they are still mushy and feel like typing on mud in comparison to mechanical keyboards.

However, a brand new rubber dome keyboard certainly feels significantly better than an old and worn-out one.
Edited by TwoCables - 3/9/11 at 8:41am
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It's a computer!
(19 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (C:\) 250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (D:\) 150 GB WD VelociRaptor Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner 
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate 
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Basic, but premium round X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
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