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[Various] Japan Nuclear Emergency - Continuous Coverage of Damage and Radiation Risks - Page 269  

post #2681 of 2836
acually, they have not stopped them from burning....
http://www.euronews.net/2011/05/14/f...all-out-tents/

They could be releasing radioactive material into the atmosphere for the next 5+ years

(thats why they are putting the tents over them)
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post #2682 of 2836
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blameless View Post
A nuclear explosion is indeed a physical impossibility.

This is true, but it's no more possible for it to go critical.
You know you don't have to explode all your nuclear fuel for a nuclear explosion. A couple of grams of the fuel can "bomb" out while the rest gets scattered which is exactly what happened.
Have you ever seen the TSAR bomb? They had to drop the bomb size on it because the original explosion only resulted in 57 percent of the fuel being exploded.
So yes you can have a nuclear explosion, no it's not a physical impossibility. It's a physical impossibiliy for ALL the fuel to go up at once. For that you need a core design and you need to put it in a thick shell even thicker than a containment shell to get it all going off at once.

But a half gram here a gram there can explode all on its own blowing things all over which is what they think happened. The plutonium melted to bottom of the pool and exploded resulting in lifting of fuel and scattering and a big giant hole in the roof and side of the building. The yeild of the explosion was probably only a few hundred pounds tnt equivalancy.
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post #2683 of 2836
Quote:
Originally Posted by aweir View Post
^question. Not to stray off topic, but if this was the case, why do we freak out when we hear of another country enriching low grade uranium only for nuclear power plants? Like when Iran says they are enriching it only for nuclear fuel, then it would not be possible to make a nuclear bomb out of it???
Because one of the easier ways to enrich uranium for weapons grade fuel involves the use of a nuclear reactor.
    
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post #2684 of 2836
Quote:
Originally Posted by SgtSpike View Post
The whole explosion theory is a pile of .... yeah.

Nuclear power plant fuel is enriched (or purified) to 3%. Nuclear weapons fuel is enriched to something like 97%.

There is no way that power plant fuel can explode like weapons fuel. It is purposefully enriched to ONLY 3% to make it more easily controllable.
I hate to break it to you. But its already happened, did you not hear the part about the fact that there has already been a small uncontrolled nuclear fission reaction? They do not enrich it as much because it makes it easier to control. Its like the difference between nitroglycerine and gasoline.

Sure the nitro is far easier to detonate and has a bigger bang for the size. But that doesn't mean that with enough gasoline in a small enough space it cannot explode.
    
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post #2685 of 2836
Quote:
Originally Posted by cdoublejj View Post
Not to be an ass but in that case whats radioactive mean?




Politicians also tend to get riled up easily.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jUbqbpBX1Us
Well if you take the word apart you get this. "Radioactive" goes to "radiation", which comes from the word "radiate"

To put it simply, the heavier an element becomes above a certain point the more likely it is to have a radioactive isotope.

Radioactive simply means that it is an isotope that gives off some kind of radiation.

And radiation in reality can mean anything from infrared radiation, electromagnetic radiation (all sorts of light in the electromagnetic spectrum) and such.

In the context of nuclear mechanics it pretty much simply means a material that gives off radiation.

"So then why is it that if I put a non radioactive piece of metal in a reactor and then take it out, they say it is radioactive?"

Well the reason is because of the neutron radiation. The fuel rods of the reactor release cr*ploads of the stuff. When a piece of neutron radiation (which is really just a really fast moving lone neutron) impacts an atom and it just so happens to hit the nucleus of the atom and bond to it the atom becomes a different isotope.

But often enough that atom doesn't want an extra neutron and will try and get rid of it through different methods. Usually through radiation because it has become unstable. An atom that becomes unstable wants to become stable again, usually by getting rid of something, that something can be a photon (gamma radiation), two protons with two neutrons (alpha radiation), a single electron (beta radiation), or just spit out another neutron or even two (neutron radiation).

That is why the piece of metal has become radioactive, because a ton of neutrons have attached themselves to the atoms the atoms have become unstable. In order to become stable they need to get rid of something, and that something changes depending on what element it is. Radiation is basically the stuff that the atom has gotten rid of in order to try and become stable again.

I hope I explained it well for you.
    
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post #2686 of 2836
The one big safeguard in the nature of nuclear power plants is their design by nature.

There have been sixty criticality accidents none of which detonated. Any number of reasons can be contributed to this. For one, none of them involved masses of uranium the size of what can potentially be reached in Reactor core 1.

The big danger is radiation (then again, when isn't it?). A criticality accident is basically when a chunk of uranium somehow becomes super critical for some period of time. Some are environmental reasons or experimental accidents.

A criticality accident releases tremendous amounts of radiation in tiny lengths of time. Cecil Kelley, a chemical operator was irradiated when a larger amount then usual of plutonium entered a reclamation tank.

When the plutonium became super critical Kelley was looking through the window of the tank, technicians said they saw a bright flash of light that knocked him off his ladder, he then ran outside and was in the snow yelling that he was "burning up".

500 rads is more then enough radiation to kill a person. In the span of 200 microseconds Kelley was irradiated with 3,600 rads of neutron and gamma radiation. He died 35 hours later.

That was a very small amount of radioactive material fissioning for a very short period of time, imagine what happens when small portions of a nuclear reactor core filled with the stuff starts to have random criticality accidents. Even if every criticality is small, each one can release tremendous amounts of radiation (including loads of neutron radiation) and the by products of each one can potentially influence more criticality's.

If there are many of these criticalities happening then the situation is an even bigger problem then Chernobyl. Chernobyl did not have too much of a problem with accidental criticalities, if memory serves they did not have any.

But you see, the neutron radiation released makes the area around the reactor (within a hundred feet) radioactive due to the instability caused by the nutrons. As more criticalities occur the area will become extremely, extremely radioactive. At Chernobyl the workers tasked with working near the reactor could only be there for three minutes before their shift ended and the "liquidators" that worked on the roof tops only 40 seconds. I think that if any more criticalities occur, I would say a minute would be really pushing it for anything within 200 feet of the core.
    
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post #2687 of 2836
Quote:
Originally Posted by aweir View Post
^question. Not to stray off topic, but if this was the case, why do we freak out when we hear of another country enriching low grade uranium only for nuclear power plants? Like when Iran says they are enriching it only for nuclear fuel, then it would not be possible to make a nuclear bomb out of it???
They can continue enriching nuclear fuel for a power plant to get to weapons-grade fuel. We freak out because enriching uranium for power-grade fuel is a stepping stone towards having nuclear-grade fuel.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hephasteus View Post
Ok mr nuclear scientist. How many neutron bursts did reactor 1 put out on it's meltdown and what kind of fuel you need to do that.
No clue. I'm not a nuclear scientist.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Singular1ty View Post
I hate to break it to you. But its already happened, did you not hear the part about the fact that there has already been a small uncontrolled nuclear fission reaction? They do not enrich it as much because it makes it easier to control. Its like the difference between nitroglycerine and gasoline.

Sure the nitro is far easier to detonate and has a bigger bang for the size. But that doesn't mean that with enough gasoline in a small enough space it cannot explode.
Sure, there's uncontrolled nuclear fissions reactions. I'm not arguing that that happens. What I AM arguing against is the people who say that it could explode. No, it cannot. Power-grade uranium cannot explode. It's just impossible, because it's not enriched enough to have a quick enough and large enough chain reaction to cause an explosion.
post #2688 of 2836
Quote:
Originally Posted by SgtSpike View Post
They can continue enriching nuclear fuel for a power plant to get to weapons-grade fuel. We freak out because enriching uranium for power-grade fuel is a stepping stone towards having nuclear-grade fuel.


No clue. I'm not a nuclear scientist.
It pulsed 13 times during the meltdown. Any one of those pulses had you been in it you would have died within hours. Nuclear powerplant fuel doesn't do that.

"Sure, there's uncontrolled nuclear fissions reactions. I'm not arguing that that happens. What I AM arguing against is the people who say that it could explode. No, it cannot. Power-grade uranium cannot explode. It's just impossible, because it's not enriched enough to have a quick enough and large enough chain reaction to cause an explosion. "

As soon as that thing pulsed on meltdown it set off everybody's satelites that are sensor packed for nuclear detection which is why they admitted it. Power grade uranium can explode. It is balanced for excess neutrons which are sucked up by the nickle control rods. You remove the control rods and it starts an explosion. It's a very very slow explosion and the core simply melts down before it reaches an explosion but some of the fuel will go off. If it's only a few atoms and results in 10 lb of tnt explosion then that's the end of the explosion. ALL the fuel won't explode because there's not enough excess neutrons to do it. 13 neutron pulses were created one of them hit other fuel and caused a small explosion relative to a nuclear bomb. It was rather large as these buildings are not cracker boxes. They are thick they are rough they are tough and it blew one of them to nearly shreds and put massive I beams in the fuel pool.

So you're sort of right. No a powerplant can't go full nuclear bomb explosive. But they can explode with rather frightening force.
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post #2689 of 2836
So, is japan safe to travel to?
post #2690 of 2836
Quote:
Originally Posted by Odyn View Post
So, is japan safe to travel to?
yes
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