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Looking for mouse benchmarks...

post #1 of 32
Thread Starter 
Anyone have links to mouse benchmarks? Like the one ESR did awhile back? I was looking for something more recent that included the DA 3.5G, Mamba, Xai, etc.
post #2 of 32
Theres this
http://wikis.jp/interfacedevice/inde...aximumSpeed_en
http://wikis.jp/interfacedevice/index.php?G-pad_en

Doesnt contain the 3.5g or xai but the 3.5 should perform very similar to the 3g and the xai use the same sensor as g9x
post #3 of 32
http://www.overclock.net/mice/854100...nce-sheet.html

It was fine earlier, but the sheet looks vandalized.. Hopefully it'll get fixed soon.

Is the Razer Deathadder one of the best options?
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post #4 of 32
Nobody has done a proper mouse review in four years unless you count the japanese benchmark but I think its half baked. But here, ill make you a chart pulled straight from my ass after using all of these sensors.


Perfect control speed.
(This is by far the most important statistic)

DA - ]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]] (very similar to the original 3G)
Xai - ]]]]] (Awful perfect control speed because of acceleration)
Mamba - Don't buy this mouse.

Malfunction speed on cloth.

DA - ]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]] (very similar to the original 3G)
Xai - ]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]
Mamba - Don't buy this mouse.

Malfunction speed on a hard pad.

DA - ]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]
Xai - ]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]
Mamba - Don't buy this mouse.
post #5 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Electric View Post
http://www.overclock.net/mice/854100...nce-sheet.html

It was fine earlier, but the sheet looks vandalized.. Hopefully it'll get fixed soon.

Is the Razer Deathadder one of the best options?
Fixed that earlier .


Quote:
Originally Posted by Derp View Post
Nobody has done a proper mouse review in four years unless you count the japanese benchmark but I think its half baked. But here, ill make you a chart pulled straight from my ass after using all of these sensors.


Perfect control speed.
(This is by far the most important statistic)

DA - ]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]] (very similar to the original 3G)
Xai - ]]]]] (Awful perfect control speed because of acceleration)
Mamba - Don't buy this mouse.

Malfunction speed on cloth.

DA - ]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]] (very similar to the original 3G)
Xai - ]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]
Mamba - Don't buy this mouse.

Malfunction speed on a hard pad.

DA - ]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]
Xai - ]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]
Mamba - Don't buy this mouse.
I could add something similar based on confirmed malfunction and perfect control rates, but it will require 2-3 different base surfaces.

I'll admit, my list is a mess and needs a major rehaul.
Edited by Skylit - 3/18/11 at 11:34pm
post #6 of 32
Derp, if you don't mind me asking, what would you say would qualify as a good mouse review?
post #7 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Warfield View Post
Derp, if you don't mind me asking, what would you say would qualify as a good mouse review?
One that actually tests the mouse instead of giving their personal opinion and calling it a day. Would you buy a $14.99 apevia power supply for your rig because someone wrote a review about it without ever testing it on PSU testing equipment to see if it could actually supply its rated watts while in spec? I wouldn't.

This is from that esr review.


Edited by Derp - 3/18/11 at 11:47pm
post #8 of 32
I see a lot of people saying the same thing. And most mice I do have or have access to. That's why I wanted to know what specifics you would like to see. Obviously anyone can comment about how the texture reduces sweat or the mouse has a nice center of balance. But trying to find news about sensors and issues like acceleration is a bit of a challenge. Usually have to wait a few months to find out.
post #9 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Warfield View Post
I see a lot of people saying the same thing. And most mice I do have or have access to. That's why I wanted to know what specifics you would like to see. Obviously anyone can comment about how the texture reduces sweat or the mouse has a nice center of balance. But trying to find news about sensors and issues like acceleration is a bit of a challenge. Usually have to wait a few months to find out.
Quote:
Why benchmark a mouse?

I've been using a mouse to play PC games since Quake was first released in 1996. I take my gaming very seriously, and played professionally for a while when Quake 3 was the number one tournament game on PC. I must have gone through hundreds of different models of mouse through the years, and was even sponsored by a mouse manufacturer at one point where my photo and endorsement was put on the back of the box. In all that time there has never been a good way to review mouse performance. It has been down to the feelings of the reviewer as to whether the mouse was given the thumbs up or thumbs down. With my education in Natural Sciences, reviews like this leave me with a sour taste in the mouth. Subjective reviews are down to how the reviewer feels on the day, and not necessarily how well the mouse performs.

Today there are a large number of mice marketed for gaming. Many of these have endorsements from some of the professional gaming teams or from well-known gaming individuals. Professional gaming continues to grow, with more prize money tournaments for a wider range of games than ever before. At these pro-gaming events you tend to see at least one of the major mouse manufacturers showcasing their products. Even the mouse pads are getting the pro-gaming treatment with hi-tech mousing surfaces being released by many different companies.

In this environment where performance is king, it's ludicrous to think that mouse performance has never been measured for reviewing the products. Imagine reviewing the latest graphics card in the same way. Without benchmarks, reviewers would have to resort to loading up their favourite game and commenting on how their frag count improved. You would have no way to compare NVIDIA and ATI cards apart from the quality of the packaging. Without benchmarking, graphics card reviews would be almost entirely useless. So why do we put up with mouse reviews that are just as useless?

I have devised the world's first independent benchmarking system where raw mouse performance can be measured and compared. If you're thinking about buying a new mouse check out the ESReality MouseScore first, or you might be sorry!


What can we measure?

Perfect Control
When you move your mouse it may result in turning your viewpoint in an FPS game, moving the cursor in an RTS game, or something else like rotating a tank turret. In each case the importance of using a mouse is the proportionate response. If you move the mouse slowly you expect to turn slowly or the cursor to scroll slowly. If you move quickly you want to be turning faster or the cursor to move quickly across the screen. If someone creeps up behind you in a game you want to be able to make a wild flick of the mouse to face your opponent quickly and return fire. The ideal mouse response is a linear one, where moving the mouse twice as fast results in a response of "twice as much". I define Perfect Control as the top speed up to which the mouse performs exactly as it should.

Malfunction Speed
Another important factor in choosing a mouse is the fastest speed you can move before it gives up and decides to fire the next rocket at your feet. I call this the Malfunction Speed, where the mouse loses control and effectively stops working. When you flick your mouse beyond the Malfunction Speed, anything can happen. You may either end up looking in any random direction or just find you haven't turned around at all. All optical and laser mice must have a Malfunction Speed, so we want it to be as high as possible so you don't notice it.
From the review here: http://www.esreality.com/?a=longpost&id=1265679&page=1

Perfect control speed, malfunction speed, weight and lift off distances on various surfaces would make for a complete review.
post #10 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Derp View Post
One that actually tests the mouse instead of giving their personal opinion and calling it a day. Would you buy a $14.99 apevia power supply for your rig because someone wrote a review about it without ever testing it on PSU testing equipment to see if it could actually supply its rated watts while in spec? I wouldn't.

This is from that esr review.
Yep, I would love to do that, I mean getting mice isn't really a problem since I could just return them to the store. My only problem is that I don't have the time or money since I'm a full time college student.

I've actually been trying to get my hands on Avago's proprietary software, but there's too much security with that and I doubt a company will leak it to me just to do some test that could potentially damage a product's sale.
Edited by Skylit - 3/19/11 at 12:03am
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