Overclock.net › Forums › Case Mods & Cases › Builds & Case Mods › Case Mods › Case Mod Work Logs › "Fire & Ice" - Case Labs M8 WC'd - Thread revived - final pics to come shortly
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

"Fire & Ice" - Case Labs M8 WC'd - Thread revived - final pics to come shortly - Page 25

post #241 of 313
Thread Starter 
Update 21 - Pump installed & tubing install begins

I posted earlier today that I wouldn't have an update until later this week . . . but plans changed for the better! My FrozenCPU order arrived earlier then I thought, and I had some time to work today which is rare during the week. Here we go . . .

So the first order of business in this update was to finally install the water pump. The original concept was to use a single Swiftech 35x pump on a single loop. Now this was going to be a semi restrictive loop as it has to push x3 360 rads, x2 GPU cards, and x1 CPU, plus a reservoir. I was concerned from the begining of using a single pump. Technically it would have been enough. However, once I added the pedestal NAS a few weeks later with 1 more CPU and another 4 ft of tubing, it was too close to my safety margin . . . so I decided to go with a dual pump setup.

Back in Update 8, I showed putting together the dual 35x pumps and an EK pump top. A pump top wasn't 100% needed, but it's the cleanest way to do dual pumps.

So what's the point? The dual pump setup gives me more pumping power for the longer single loop and all the water blocks and rads it must push through. Also, it is built in redundancy in case one of the pumps fails. With a single pump, you run the risk of a pump dieing - water boiling, gear over heats or tubes burst, etc. Dual pumps give a bit of redundacy allowing time for me to replace one of the pumps if needed.

Here are a couple shots from Update 8

The two pumps with the pump tops removed
ss852511.jpg

And again with the two pumps installed under the new dual pump top. This top allows water to enter into one pump, push into the next pump, and then out in series.
ss852517.jpg

The above orientation is how it will sit in the case, but the stickers are a problem. Since the warranty is already blown, I don't have to fear removing the stickers for that reason. I pulled one off, and was left with VERY sticky residue left over that even Goo Gone couldn't remove. I then tried a heat gun on the 2nd pump - same issue. It looks terrible right in front perfectly viewable.

To fix the issue, I decided to sway from my original plan of leaving the whole block black, and decided to add the FIRE touch.

I uninstalled the pumps from the top again - here are the two bottom housings
p1010771r.jpg

Wrapped them in a bit of the vinyl
p1010776l.jpg

And then finally sprayed with red
p1010778c.jpg

Here's one of the pumps ready for reassembly
p1010780v.jpg

Installed one of the pumps on top.
NOTE - my pump top did NOT come with any screws of any kind. I had to pick up a few M4x16mm from the hardware store
p1010785p.jpg

Done - no more sticker labels, and now that it's done I like it better then leaving them solid black. Another thing to NOTE, is that these pumps can run a bit hot and need good cooling. In fact, I think they make an addon cooling fan kit just for these pumps. Wrapping them in vinyl will add to those heating problems even more - although not by much.
p1010787cl.jpg

Keeping the pumps cool shouldn't be an issue for me though. Here's where they're being installed - Fresh air from the outside, and a fan directly underneath pulling the heat away . . . almost like I planned it that way . . .
p1010790y.jpg

Before it can be installed in the case, I have to do something about the mess of wires
p1010795km.jpg

There are four wires per pump
Yellow - 12v
Green - PWM control
Blue - RPM Sensor
Black - Ground
p1010797g.jpg

They were a bit of a pain to sleeve as the inner wires were sleeved together and the outer pair was sleeved together as they go to different places. First the RPM sensor and PWM wires are sleeved
p1010807c.jpg

Then the power and ground together
p1010808k.jpg

I went back and forth on a few ideas for mounting into the case. I was considering suspending it in a mesh cage suspended in the air above the fans. The would have led to a few more 90 degree fittings that I wanted to avoid so I opted to keep it simple and use double sided sticky foam - handily enough it was included with the pumps!

1/4" thick foam - this will muffle all the vibrations from the pump operations
p1010813h.jpg

Cut in half
p1010814a.jpg

I then put them in the rough place I wanted them, and had several back and forths setting the pump in and pulling it out to get these lined up and trimmed up as needed. The will sit like so
p1010820od.jpg

And finally mounted to the pumps themselves. The white backing shown here will be removed just before the final install as I'll have to move it in and out several times when I start the tubing runs.
p1010822w.jpg

Prior to installing the pumps in the case, I had to complete a few more steps first as the install will be semi permanent. First up was to replace the bright green O-rings on the connectors with red o-rings to match the theme.
p1010826f.jpg
p1010840n.jpg

For this build, I chose a tubing size of 1/2" ID - 3/4" OD. (ID=inner diameter / OD=outter diameter) Also, all fittings are G1/4 size which is pretty much the standard now days.

I then cut and installed the first tube in the loop. This one is going from the pass through to the reservoir on the ICE side. I'm using compression fittings instead of barbs as I feel they are more secure and look cleaner.
p1010833xo.jpg

I then fit the other end of the tube onto a 90 degree rotary fitting into the pumps. Once connected, I then removed the backing on the foam mounts and secured the pumps in place. Also shown in this pic is a 90 degree fitting at the pump exit - however this fitting has another G1/4 size mount instead of a rotary fitting.
p1010834r.jpg

Now that the pump was installed, a bit of cable management is in order. I used two wire clamps to help cleanly route the power/ground wires to the bottom opening into the ICE side, and the RPM/PWM up and around to the fan headers in the motherboard.
p1010843n.jpg
p1010845i.jpg

NOTE - a brief lesson - PWM = Pulse Width Modulation. Basically, the PWM signal is sent from the motherboard out to PWM sensitive devices to control the speed of said devices. The device can be a fan, fan controller, or in this case a pump. You are then able to control the signal with software to set the speeds of the connected devices.

So in this case, I'll be able to set custom curves so as the PC heats up from use, the pumps will go faster with the result being more cooling. As the PC goes back to idle and cools off, the pumps slow down to conserve electricity. At some point, I'll wire the fan controller into the PWM signal as well, but I want to do some testing first.

Back to the tubing!

Remember that 90 degree fitting coming out of the pumps? Now I've installed a quick disconnect fitting. The purpose of this fitting is to allow me to break the loop when I need to replace a part or remove the motherboard tray WITHOUT having to drain the loop first. The fitting comes in two sides a male and a female. Here it is shown together, and then installed on the pumps.
p1010830d.jpg
p1010847fp.jpg

After the tubing was cut to size, it was installed over the fitting
p1010851s.jpg

The cap was the screwed on to secure the line - hence the term compression fitting. The other end was then connected to a 90 degree fitting on the bottom of the first GPU water block.
p1010854r.jpg

Here is a shot of the quick disconnect . . . disconnected. These are Koolance VL3N QDC's. The plunger design on these is said to release barely a drop when disconnected.
p1010858x.jpg

Here is where I wish I could have shown the completed EK bridge piece mentioned through out the log. However, I ran into a problem. The bridge I bought was of a length allowing 1 GPU > empty slot > 1 GPU.

This motherboard is the Crosshair V, and while that config will work, it is not optimum for this board. The first card would be running at x16 speed and the 2nd card at x8 - which run together will run both cards at the slower speed defeating the purpose really. In order to have both cards run at x16 speed, I had to drop the bottom card one slot making the bridge piece to short. I was unable to find one that would fit my config. The only one long enough was for 3 cards and there is no way to plug the opening for the 3rd card slot.

All that to say, I had to go back to the old school way of doing things, (Can anything in water cooling be called old school?) and just run a small piece of tubing between the cards.

I did not get any pics of the process, but it was similar to all the other tubing connections. I used a 90 degree fitting into the bottom of the card, and plugged the other side. Then I used straight thru fittings on either side of the tubes in the middle. I did both sides in parallel instead of serial. Then finally a plug and a 45 degree fitting out of the top
p1010866y.jpg

Then I called it quits for the night. The final shot is the FIRE side showing all the work above completed.
p1010870u.jpg

The rest of the tubing will be completed this week for the next update. It feels good to finally get to the water cooling portion of the build. My only grip is the silver quick disconnect fittings, but I can live with it. This rig continues to come together, and I love the way it looks! As this is currently sitting in my dining room, the past month it has had some funny comments and looks from visitors to our home. Friends and family hear I'm building another PC . . . big deal! Then they come over and see this sitting there and I typically hear a "*** is that?" biggrin.gif


Thanks for coming along on another update. Until next time . . .
/Bear
Edited by Bear907 - 9/20/11 at 12:07am
post #242 of 313
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bear907;14997462 
p1010866y.jpg

Wouldn't the water just go straight to the outlet and the water in the blocks would not be circulating if you set it up like that? Even with the outlet on the other port I would still think that flow would be affected and might not reach both blocks. I might be wrong though.
Project Taro
(15 items)
 
HAFX ReVamped
(18 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 4690k Asus Z97I-Plus EVGA GTX 980 SC Kingston Hyperx Fury 2x4GB 1866Mhz 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingOS
Crucial MX100 512GB Samsung Spinpoint M6T 2TB 2.5" Custom Loop  Windows 8.1 Pro 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
Dell P2414H CM Storm Quick Fire Rapid-i Silverstone SX600-G Fractal Design Node 304 
MouseAudioAudio
Mionix Naos 7000 Audio Technica A900X Fiio E17 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 930 @ 4Ghz w/ 1.3v HT on Asus P6X58D-E 2x Zotac GTX 470 @ 850Mhz Corsair Dominator TR3X6G1600C8D 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveCooling
Corsair Force 3 120GB 2x WD Black 640 GB (RAID0) Seagate Barracuda 3TB See Sig 
OSMonitorKeyboardPower
Windows 7 Ultimate x64 Samsung 2443BW-HAS 1920x1200 Razer Blackwidow Corsair HX850 
CaseMouseAudioAudio
Cooler Master HAF X Cyborg R.A.T. 9 Asus Xonar DX Klipsch Promedia 2.1 
  hide details  
Reply
Project Taro
(15 items)
 
HAFX ReVamped
(18 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 4690k Asus Z97I-Plus EVGA GTX 980 SC Kingston Hyperx Fury 2x4GB 1866Mhz 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingOS
Crucial MX100 512GB Samsung Spinpoint M6T 2TB 2.5" Custom Loop  Windows 8.1 Pro 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
Dell P2414H CM Storm Quick Fire Rapid-i Silverstone SX600-G Fractal Design Node 304 
MouseAudioAudio
Mionix Naos 7000 Audio Technica A900X Fiio E17 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 930 @ 4Ghz w/ 1.3v HT on Asus P6X58D-E 2x Zotac GTX 470 @ 850Mhz Corsair Dominator TR3X6G1600C8D 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveCooling
Corsair Force 3 120GB 2x WD Black 640 GB (RAID0) Seagate Barracuda 3TB See Sig 
OSMonitorKeyboardPower
Windows 7 Ultimate x64 Samsung 2443BW-HAS 1920x1200 Razer Blackwidow Corsair HX850 
CaseMouseAudioAudio
Cooler Master HAF X Cyborg R.A.T. 9 Asus Xonar DX Klipsch Promedia 2.1 
  hide details  
Reply
post #243 of 313
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winrahr;14997537 
Wouldn't the water just go straight to the outlet and the water in the blocks would not be circulating if you set it up like that? Even with the outlet on the other port I would still think that flow would be affected and might not reach both blocks. I might be wrong though.

Thanks for pointing that out. I do indeed have the top fitting on the wrong port - it should be on the left not the right. I will correct that before moving on.

As to your other concern, running the blocks in parallel will work just fine. The idea is that the water flows into both cards on the right side of the blocks and exits on the left side of the blocks and out. I will have more then enough pressure in the loop to be sure water is moving through both blocks. Here is a pic showing the waterflow differences between parallel and serial.
exblc7562.jpg

I've basically built the same path using tubing instead of the bridge piece that I wanted to use. Both ways work fine from all the research I've done. The main difference between to the two is parallel is less restrictive then serial. If folks have different experiences, I'm all ears!

/Bear
post #244 of 313
Lookin' good.

I see it's too late to tell you this, but keep it in mind for next build: The adhesives they usually use to attach those labels are fat soluble, scrape off what you can then spray some cooking spray on whats left and let it sit for a while. It should come off eventually.

That's some wonky motherboard if you have to separate your cards by 3 slots to get them to run at max bandwidth.
Sierpinski
(9 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i5-6500 Gigabyte H170-WiFi Radeon Nano 2x8GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4-3000 Memory 
Hard DriveCoolingOSPower
Samsung 950 Pro Cryorig C7 Windows 10 Pro Silverstone Strider Gold 450W Fully Modular 
Case
Fractal Design Node 202 
  hide details  
Reply
Sierpinski
(9 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i5-6500 Gigabyte H170-WiFi Radeon Nano 2x8GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4-3000 Memory 
Hard DriveCoolingOSPower
Samsung 950 Pro Cryorig C7 Windows 10 Pro Silverstone Strider Gold 450W Fully Modular 
Case
Fractal Design Node 202 
  hide details  
Reply
post #245 of 313
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BirdofPrey;15000720 
Lookin' good.

I see it's too late to tell you this, but keep it in mind for next build: The adhesives they usually use to attach those labels are fat soluble, scrape off what you can then spray some cooking spray on whats left and let it sit for a while. It should come off eventually.

That's some wonky motherboard if you have to separate your cards by 3 slots to get them to run at max bandwidth.

Cooking spray eh? That's a new one for me. I'll keep it in mind for next time!

The motherboard slots are a bit frustrating. Originally when I read the manual for the board, it says for crossfire use slots 1 & 3 for x16 speed on both. So I bought the bridge piece that matches that description, but I didn't confirm it physically on the board. The result is that technically, the manual was correct in that the x16 slots are PCIE slot 1 & 3, but physically it's slots 1 & 5.

I wasted $50 bucks on the bridge and links, but I may reuse them in another build. Oh well . . .
post #246 of 313
Just to mention on the silver quick disconnect , I know it must bother you cause it sticks out, but just think of it as the flint that starts the fire! Maybe that will make it more okay smile.gif Cause flint is close to that color haha smile.gif Great build btw, The NAS in the pedastal is brilliant.
Nano Optimus
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 920@ 4 Msi Big Bang Power X MSI 560TI Twin Frozr II 4gb Crucial Ballistix 1600 
Hard DriveOSMonitorPower
124gb Crucial M4 + 500g Black Cavier+ F3 storag Windows 7 Dell u2311h 1080p Xigmateck 650w 
CaseMouse
Antec 902 modded Zowie EC2 
  hide details  
Reply
Nano Optimus
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 920@ 4 Msi Big Bang Power X MSI 560TI Twin Frozr II 4gb Crucial Ballistix 1600 
Hard DriveOSMonitorPower
124gb Crucial M4 + 500g Black Cavier+ F3 storag Windows 7 Dell u2311h 1080p Xigmateck 650w 
CaseMouse
Antec 902 modded Zowie EC2 
  hide details  
Reply
post #247 of 313
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nano5656;15001892 
Just to mention on the silver quick disconnect , I know it must bother you cause it sticks out, but just think of it as the flint that starts the fire! Maybe that will make it more okay smile.gif Cause flint is close to that color haha smile.gif Great build btw, The NAS in the pedastal is brilliant.

Haha! I love it . . . and I'm stealing it the next time I explain it to someone!
post #248 of 313
Nice setup on the pumps since I hear the mcp 35x can get really hot. Though I would turn that fan the other way to blow air to them as opposed to pull the heat from them. Just my take smile.gif
post #249 of 313
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by wermad;15005992 
Nice setup on the pumps since I hear the mcp 35x can get really hot. Though I would turn that fan the other way to blow air to them as opposed to pull the heat from them. Just my take smile.gif

TBH, I'm torn and will test it each way before I settle on the final orientation of that fan. My concern is that there is no intake in the pedestal - both fans are exhaust - so there would be no fresh air coming Up into the pumps. I'm hoping the fresh air from the front side will be enough to cool them, but the first week I'll be keeping a close eye on them.

Now that I think about it, I'm not sure how to tell if one of the pumps has died or not. I imagine I won't be able to tell by the vibration as the pumps are connected to the same top. I haven't liked any of the flow meters or temp sensor readouts I've seen either . . . Guess I'll have to come up with a flow meter / temp sensor solution for the next phase of upgrades. Thoughts?
post #250 of 313
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bear907;15006675 
TBH, I'm torn and will test it each way before I settle on the final orientation of that fan. My concern is that there is no intake in the pedestal - both fans are exhaust - so there would be no fresh air coming Up into the pumps. I'm hoping the fresh air from the front side will be enough to cool them, but the first week I'll be keeping a close eye on them.

Now that I think about it, I'm not sure how to tell if one of the pumps has died or not. I imagine I won't be able to tell by the vibration as the pumps are connected to the same top. I haven't liked any of the flow meters or temp sensor readouts I've seen either . . . Guess I'll have to come up with a flow meter / temp sensor solution for the next phase of upgrades. Thoughts?

Just plumb the the pumps. Disco one from its power and if you hear noise, reconnect that one and unplug the other. They do have a bit of noise coming from the to let you know if either is working.

btw, you don't have to connect the whole loop, just the reservoir and the pumps should be enough.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Case Mod Work Logs
Overclock.net › Forums › Case Mods & Cases › Builds & Case Mods › Case Mods › Case Mod Work Logs › "Fire & Ice" - Case Labs M8 WC'd - Thread revived - final pics to come shortly