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P67 vs. Z68 - Page 8

Poll Results: Which setup is better and future proof?

 
  • 45% (128)
    P67 - You don't need anything else
  • 54% (151)
    Z68 - Newer technology is better
279 Total Votes  
post #71 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by leichtwork;13532901 
zsolmanz, I think you really took what I was saying all wrong. I did not say you can not use it. But if you are going to be building a gaming rig and you want the best for your money. That would include the ability to over clock, you can not do this with any great success other then being able over clock a little, and that is even if the feature is available because many on them don't let you do that. Because you can't change the mulitiplier even if it is a K series chip. So this moves it back into the class as your run of the mill home computer. Now encoding movies and being a gamer are two different things. There are more people that use there computer to copy movies and all that jazz then people that just game alone.

Me I don't encode movies but I have 10 friends that do and they don't touch games. Now I game a lot and that is all I use my computer for (well besides work, I'm a graphic designer). But if I was to build a computer to surf the net, check email, use word processing, and stuff to that nature, I would see no need to buy anything but the H67.

Now for the SSD caching, please enjoy that. Go spend the money on a small ssd and have your caching and then buy your 2 other drives that you want to raid. I'm going to stick with my larger SSD for not that much more money and have greater over all performance. I would much rather not pay to piggy back a ssd on my hdd. Thats just my 2 cents.

Thank you for explaining ssd caching. I wasnt quite sure what it was all about. It would seem the only real benefit is for smaller ssd drives.
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post #72 of 91
I just have a regular HDD, but do gaming and editing especially with music. Thats one reason my stuff took so long to do because the encoding and decoding took so long.
Hows this board?
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813157252
Not looking for crazy OC'n but something that will hold a nice 500mhz increase with an i5 2500k.
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post #73 of 91
Yeah, its really what is suited to your needs. What do you do more of, what are you going to really be doing with your computer. Not so much what it can do but what you need it to do. Now building a really good gaming rig can double as many other things. But if you want to build a great rig to encode video then its not going to be the best gaming rig. Unless you just spend a crap load of money and your going to take a hit in some part of your computer.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not talking crap about any of the different Sandy Bridge boards. They all have there place and use. Now the Z series boards has features from both the P series and H series boards.
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post #74 of 91
I'll take your advice Leichtwork...
I think a gaming rig will be better suited for me besides that i5 should really make up ground for decoding then encoding work. That MSI p67 entry board has a video adapter on it, I'm also planning on connecting a security camera to it.
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post #75 of 91
Maybe I'm just a little bit slow, but if there is little to no difference in the price point for P67 and Z68, and you can achieve the same overclocking results on both platforms....where is the logic in being so strongly against Z68? Word on the street is that P67/Z68 will be Ivy Bridge compatible with a BIOS update, and if you take the new Z68 features out of the equation it's like comparing oranges to oranges. Or maybe it's a little of the "well I have chipset X so that makes it better" syndrome that is always present with some people on this forum (and plenty of other forums as well.)

The decision tree hasn't really changed with the release of the Z68, and when you're talking about chipset vs. chipset for overclockers it really comes down to 1155 (P67/Z68) vs. 1366, quad core vs. hex core, 1 x16 PCI-E lane vs. 2-3 x16 PCI-E lanes, dual-channel vs. triple-channel memory, lower cost vs. higher cost, and to be honest, which chipset do you think Intel is going to screw you on 6-12 months from now. I'm not even bringing 1156 into the mix because that was dead from the start, but there were arguments from both the 1366 and 1156 camps similar to this one. My 860@4.1Ghz does everything I need it to do for gaming, video encoding, and extreme multi-tasking, but there will be no future upgrades without moving to either 1366 or 1155. I've debated switching to 1366 for the past year, but now I have to choose between 1366 and 1155. Both overclock extremely well, and are feature-rich platforms, and there are numerous arguments for and against each of them. Personally, I want to squeeze everything I can out of any system I build and OC, even if I won't push it to the max on a daily basis.

At the moment we're only seeing the 1st generation of Z68 boards, but I'm sure these will evolve/improve as the tech behind the Z68 is refined in the Rev2/3 boards. Or it may not. I think Z68 is heading in the right direction, and for certain types of people it will be better in Rev1 than the P67, but having the extra features isn't going to hurt you if it doesn't take more $$$ out of your pocket for no good reason, AND you can get the same OC performance as the P67. (This is Overclock.net, correct???)

I'm curious to see a serious folders' review of the Z68, and how it compares to the P67.

Oh yeah, and anyone who uses the phrase "future proof" in the context of system building / microarchitecture should be fed to wild dogs.
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post #76 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by combat_jack;13535355 
Maybe I'm just a little bit slow, but if there is little to no difference in the price point for P67 and Z68, and you can achieve the same overclocking results on both platforms....where is the logic in being so strongly against Z68? Word on the street is that P67/Z68 will be Ivy Bridge compatible with a BIOS update, and if you take the new Z68 features out of the equation it's like comparing oranges to oranges.

Excellently put! I agree entirely smile.gif I'd have to disagree with your statement about the phrase "future-proofing" though. I had to replace my first motherboard because I didn't realise I'd want RAID or Overclocking in the future.
Since I don't know how my usage will change when (if :S) I go off to uni, I'd rather have a board with all the available options enabled. Even if it does cost me £10 or £20 more...
Quote:
Originally Posted by leichtwork;13533066 
If you want to build a great rig to encode video then its not going to be the best gaming rig. Unless you just spend a crap load of money, you're going to take a hit in some part of your computer.

You mean buying an i7 2600K and copious amounts of RAM with which to encode means you'll have to cut, for example, graphics? Fair point.


I don't know - I voted for Z68, since that would be my recommendation. But if, OP, you're certain you won't need the extra features of Z68 (before your next upgrade) then go for the P67 with no regrets. It's a slightly more mature platform too, which is always nice...


@Leichtwork:
Quote:
Originally Posted by leichtwork;13532901 
if you are going to be building a gaming rig and you want the best for your money. That would include the ability to over clock

Forgive me if I'm mistaken, only I was under the impression that most (if not all) games are currently very GPU-limited, and so overclocking (even the stunning OC of SB processors) is going to offer a somewhat limited benefit. Just as you know gamers like yourself who don't need the conversion facilities, I know gamers who don't OC. That being the case, it might be preferential to buy H67 + better graphics card (only, obviously, if you're on a seriously tight budget).
For this debate though, the point is moot since Z68 has (or should have) the same CPU OC as P67.
Quote:
Originally Posted by leichtwork;13532901 
Now for the SSD caching, please enjoy that. Go spend the money on a small ssd and have your caching and then buy your 2 other drives that you want to raid. I'm going to stick with my larger SSD for not that much more money and have greater over all performance. I would much rather not pay to piggy back a ssd on my hdd. That's just my 2 cents.

Who said I'd have to pay? My statement reflected the nature of my personal upgrade path, which includes the 60Gb Corsair Force 100 in my current spec. In my experience, 60Gb is not enough to use as a boot drive without being a massive, massive pain too. Hence, I would find a use for caching.
I'm definitely not trying to suggest that caching is a good idea. Frankly, it's a ridiculous concept for most home users. But for someone in my position? Perfect smile.gif
Edited by zsolmanz - 5/17/11 at 11:02am
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post #77 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by zsolmanz;13537792 
Excellently put! I agree entirely smile.gif I'd have to disagree with your statement about the phrase "future-proofing" though.
My point was that nothing is "future proof" in the realm of technology, and by definition that phrase implies that the current tech will never be rendered obsolete. Anyone thinking that they're building a system that will be "future proof" is delusional. A platform may be relevant and usable at a high level for 2-4 years, but it will have been surpassed by newer/better tech within 6-12 months. The correct way to look at it is which platform will have the greatest longevity.

You can plan for possible future needs and buy tech with features you might want to use in the future, but the tech itself will NEVER be future proof. Intel and AMD make sure of that, and those of us who can't help ourselves from buying the newest, shiniest toy on the market only add fuel to that fire.
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post #78 of 91
It does not matter which one you get, both will be equally good at OCing your CPU. What matters is how much you spend on your motherboard. The more you spend, the better it will OC, but even on a budget OCing board with either chipset, you can expect to hit at least 4.7 with a 2500K no matter what. The chipset will make no difference. The things that matter most for OCing are VRMs and stuff like that ...


The range of OCs for a 2500K is about 4.7 to 5.5. Dont expect to get anything above or under that amount no matter what mobo you get. The more you pay for your mobo. the closer you will be to the 5.5 end of the spectrum. Use that mentality to decide which to get.


Either way, it comes down to how much you want to spend. I suggest finding a mobo that has all the features you want and the best price you are willing to pay and get that one, regardless of the chipset.
Edited by Kirby1 - 5/17/11 at 11:08pm
    
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post #79 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by combat_jack;13546473 
You can plan for possible future needs and buy tech with features you might want to use in the future, but the tech itself will NEVER be future proof.

So we're just debating a technicality? Fair enough. In future I will try to use the word longevity.
I like to buy motherboards with longevity?
I like to buy motherboards which serve my potential future requirements...

Urgh. So wordy. Anyway, back on topic: The above answer is THE answer. I agree totally smile.gif
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post #80 of 91
I'd say the Z68 smile.gif
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