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post #21 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by fl0w3n;12805216 
Hmm, that is saying a lot considering your name tongue.gif

Ok, you busted me! LOL:wave2:biggrin.gif:typer:
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post #22 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by fl0w3n;12805269 
I suppose so, but I don't think they cover damage to stuff in just a thunderstorm?
First, brownouts (low voltage) must never damage any electronics. Low voltage can be harmful to motorized appliances (ie refrigerator) which is why utilities keep voltages so controlled. Or disconnect power when voltage cannot be maintained. Meanwhile, ideal voltage for all electronics is even when incandescent bulbs dim to 50% intensity. That voltage might be harmful to the refrigerator. But is never harmful to any electronics.

Second, surges (high voltage) are destructive because nobody knows it will happen. Protectors are installed for all surges including direct lightning strikes. Effective protection means using all appliances without fear during every thunderstorm.

But most homes do not have effective protection. Critical is to have one protector, located at the service entrance, and connected short (ie 'less than 10 feet') to single point earth ground. Most do not have this least expensive and superior solution because it is not required by code. And because a majority are educated by advertising; not by science. Most do not know how surge protection even from direct lightning strikes has been done for over 100 years.

Protection means no energy is inside a house. Once that energy is inside, then nothing (no protector) will stop at hunt for earth, destructivley, via appliances. Sometimes, a protector gives energy even more paths to find earth destructively. What kind of protection is that? Ineffective.

Protection means no energy inside. One 'whole house' protector connects to earth before energy can enter a building. Hundreds of thousands of joules dissipate harmlessly outside. Then massive energy is not seeking earth destructively inside. Protection even from direct lightning strikes has been that routine for over 100 years.

Same solution also makes other surges irrelevant. Including surges created by stray cars, falling wires, and utility switching. Nobody can disconnect fast enough. Effective surge protection means all surges at every minute are made irrelevant.

Your telco's computer is connected to overhead wires all over town. It suffers about 100 surges with each storm. How often is your town without phone service for four days while they replace their switching computer? Defined is a solution that telcos use all over the world to have direct lightning strikes without damage. You phone line already has that solution. But what most often connects direct lightning strikes destructively to household appliances? AC electric.

Effective protectors provided by more responsible companies include ABB, Siemens, Leviton, Intermatic, Keison, Square D, and General Electric - to name but only a few. A Cutler-Hammer solution sells for less than $50 in Lowes and Home Depot. An effective solution always has a dedicated wire for that short connection to single point ground. Either you have earthed a 'whole house' protector. Or you have virtually no protection (other than robust protection inside each appliance).

No protector does protection. Either each incoming wire connects directly to earth (ie cable TV, satellite dish). Or it connects short (ie 'less than 10 feet') via a 'whole house' protector. Protection is always the single point earth ground.

For over 100 years, protection from all surges including direct lightning strikes has never been about a protector. Has always been about earthing. A protector is only as effective as its earth ground. Science so well proven (even in every telco CO) that lightning damage is considered a human mistake. Protection is defined only by the quality of and short connection (ie 'less than 10 feet') to single point earth ground. Not about some box that will make hundreds of thousands of joules magically disappear.
Edited by westom - 3/21/11 at 3:34am
post #23 of 26
Yes some most I think covers personal property during a lightning strike. My father got a brand new TV couple years back cuz a lightning storm did some electrical damage. However, I find it funny that those surge protectors or even UPS say they protect against xxxx amount of joules and they offer money back guarantee up to an absurd amount of money. Joules is a measure of energy, not electrical current. And a lightning strike provides about 10,000,000,000 joules of energy on average. But I wouldn't worry to much about it. Like everyone suggested either wait it out or if you hear thunder and see lightning shut er down. You can usually tell when they are getting pretty close.
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post #24 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfizz84;12810749 
However, I find it funny that those surge protectors or even UPS say they protect against xxxx amount of joules and they offer money back guarantee up to an absurd amount of money.
They claim to absorb hundreds of joules. A destructive surge is typically hundreds of thousands of joules. Another problem with power strip protector is house fires. Where is that protector located? On a desktop with papers? On a rug? Behind furniture?

The internet is full of stories of surge damage because the surge happened long before anyone knew a surge was coming. Listed were some examples. Blue sky lightning is an other example.

Your furnace, dimmer switches, clock radio, and dishwasher also need that protection. How do you disconnect them? Responsible consumers do not. Informed consumers earth one 'whole house' protector. Then need not disconnect anything.

What most needs protection during a surge? Smoke detectors. What protects them? Disconnecting?

Best solution is also the least expensive. About $1 per protected appliance. Then hundreds of thousands of joules dissipate harmlessly outside a house. Then nobody even knew a surge existed.

Nobody can know every approaching storm. Effective means one must know. In two of every three hours, a homeowner is also away or asleep. More reasons why disconnecting is ineffective protection. Effective protection means every surge is made irrelevant. That means earthing one 'whole house' protector. A solution so effective that surge damage is considered a human failure.
post #25 of 26
I like to keep it simple (and not lengthy): use a top-quality surge suppressor, and unplug it when a thunderstorm rolls through. I also unplug the coaxial cable from the cable modem because that's another link to a grid that is outside.

I think that it doesn't need to be any more complex than that. No surge suppressor can block the surge a direct lightning strike creates, nor can any surge suppressor block the surge that a nearby strike creates. However, good surge suppressors can (and do) a great job of suppressing and blocking almost all other surges at all times.
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post #26 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoCables;12810860 
I like to keep it simple (and not lengthy): use a top-quality surge suppressor, and unplug it when a thunderstorm rolls through.
Correct. No surge protector can block a surge. And "top-quality" plug-in protectors claim to do that blocking. Soundbyte reasoning (posts that ignore facts and numbers) demonstrate why scams are so profitable. And why Monster also sells an equivalent product.

Either energy connects to earth harmlessly outside. Or energy hunts for earth destructively via appliances - no matter what plug-in protector or disconnecting is done. Once that energy is inside, then nothing averts a destructive hunt.

Early 20th century Ham radio operators would disconnect their equipment. Even put antenna leads inside a mason jar. And still suffered damage. Damage stopped when incoming wires were earthed. No way around science. Either that energy is earthed harmlessly outside. Or no effective protection exists.

View your coax cable. If properly installed, then it is already earthed before entering the building. That is protection superior to any top-quality protector. And for free.

Define a top-quality protector. Take a $3 power strip. Add some ten cent protector parts. Sell it for $7 in the supermarket. Or sell a similar circuit for $25 or $60 by hyping 'top-quality' in advertising. Read its spec numbers. Why is the $60 one called top-quality? Many are easily manipulated by advertising and paint. Many do not read numeric specs. A $7 protector is top-quality when it sells for $70.

Monster has a long history of identifying scams. Then selling equivalent products for even higher prices. Monster sold $7 speaker wire for $70 by simply claiming their speaker wire had polarity. Then so many *knew* they could hear better sound. A similar protector also sells under the Monster name for $80 or $150. If Monster is selling it, then suspect all those products are best called a scam. Top-quality? Show me their spec numbers. Only 'quality' number is its price. Similar protector circuit sells for $7 in the supermarket.

Either a protector has that always required short (ie ‘less than 10 foot’) connection to earth. Or it does not even claim protection. A protector without that short and dedicated wire to earth energy is a profit center. So many will disconnect appliances rather than spend less money for a well proven solution. The always damning question. Where do hundreds of thousands of joules dissipate? "Top-quality" protectors avoid that question.

Soundbyte reasoning is for those who all but want to be scammed. No way around reality. A 'quality' protector makes that short (ie 'less than 10 foot') connection to single point earth ground. And costs about $1 per protected appliance. The effective protector makes even direct lightning strike irrelevant. Only the scam 'top-quality' protector claims to block any surge. If the surge can be blocked, it was already blocked better inside every appliance. Just another fact that profit center protectors hope you never learn.
Edited by westom - 3/21/11 at 4:34am
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