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Socket 1155 CPU insertion guide

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
I decided to repost this, from another thread I replied in, because after a few CPU swaps on this socket, I'm realizing just how tricky it is to make sure the CPU is in properly, compared to sockets with bigger pins (Like previous generation 775).

First, obviously inspect the board before first (or any future) CPU installs. You want to get any possible potential for non straight pins diagnosed right away, as it's possible to get a board that was made on a monday or a friday. Then, when you insert the CPU, very lightly insert it and make sure sure the tabs go into place in the notches to the side (otherwise known as the keyed notch).

Now comes the critical part. And on boards that do not have obvious bent pins (some come bent before you have even done anything), this will prevent any pins from bending.

Make sure that the CPU is actually "recessed" fully in, and not partially sticking out in a weird way. It's sometimes hard to tell if it's in correctly, especially if this is one of your first builds !! You can safely find out how it should be, by removing the CPU and reinserting it, and watching to make sure the CPU actually goes into the slot properly, instead of looking like it is sitting "halfway" above it. Once it seems like it is "fully" notched into the recess, then check the four corners and give the cpu a VERY light, slight "nudge". The cpu SHOULD NOT move. if you've built a system before, you will know exactly what to expect here. Basically, the CPU should feel almost as if it "Dropped" a few millimeters down, evenly at all sides, at once (sort of like a miniature snap in, but without any real presure applied. Once you see that the CPU is recessed in the socket, THEN you can lower the lever and retaining bracket down to the screw area to firmly push it down and secure it mechanically.

Taking the time to do this very final step, and to be OCD about it, will save you a lot of grief. I can not stress how EASY it is to think the CPU is in properly and NOT have it in properly!!

This MIGHT ALSO give you a small chance to prevent you from bending a pin that isn't 100% fully straight (one of those Monday or Friday boards).

On my second CPU install, I was very meticulous and I noticed when I put the CPU into the socket, that it wasn't "fully" in like it was supposed to be, despite the notches lining up. A simple removal and a "flat, direct reinsertion" and very tiny nudging, made the CPU "drop" into place, then I knew fully it was good to go.

It will take some elbow grease to force the retaining mechanism in, but if you're sure the CPU is PROPERLY inserted, do NOT be afraid of the creaking noise you will hear. That's normal and something new to these sockets (This did NOT happen on socket 775).

As cpu socket pins get narrower and narrower, the process is going to start feeling like you're playing an old 1970's game of "Operation"...

Hope this saves someone the horror of having boot loops and a dead board due to a bent pin !
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SB Rig
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post #2 of 5
Or you could look on the CPU for the golden corner

Intel-Core-i7-2600K-Up-for-Grabs-on-eBay-Listed-at-699-2.jpg

Look in the bottom left.
post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 
It's not the magic corner that's the problem smile.gif In fact, unlike the 775 cpu's, where the corner is the key part, the 1155 two sided key makes that easy. It's making sure all four sides are completely and evenly inserted. The easy part is aligning the CPU. The notches only go one way.
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SB Rig
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7-2600k Gigabyte P67A-UD5 B3 R9 290X 16GB 
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WD 2 TB, WD 1 TB, 250gb Liteon ihbs212 blu-ray burner/reader XP+W7 Benq XL2720Z 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Ducky Shine 69/Year of the Goat/Shine 5 Seasonic Platinum X1000 Corsair 760T Logitech G502 with r0ach approved ™ sensor 
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post #4 of 5
I didn't have any problems at all with inserting my 1155 CPU, it was pretty much the same as any other socket I've ever had (775, AM2/3, 939). Just match up the markings, carefully insert and pull back the locking pin. It's not rocket science and I got it first time.

Still, it's easy to see you put a fair bit of effort into the write-up, so I can only hope somebody benefits from it. Inserting a CPU isn't something that needs to be complicated though, it's easy as pie.
post #5 of 5
I did mine after having my eyes removed.....
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