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post #6831 of 7360
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr6686 View Post
 
Quote:
to donate to charities
and
Quote:
to raise money for Waterfox
give me a sense of contradiction.

Is that a percentage is given to charities and the rest to Waterfox?

 

The charities are the ones that select the % of the donation that goes to Waterfox.


Edited by MrAlex - 4/2/15 at 5:24pm
    
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post #6832 of 7360
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrAlex View Post

Haven't managed to test any exotic refresh rates such as those. What exactly happens?

I don't have a video/image of this since I don't have anything to use silverlight at the moment but these video show a similar effect (albeit on Google Chrome, but the behavior is same for firefox)... The entire screen (one playing the video) goes into full screen static. Closing plugin container via task manager closes the full screen static.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ijD3KwuHKGg
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=idY8QswoxGs
post #6833 of 7360
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrAlex View Post

I'll err, have a look into it.


If you can reproduce it in Firefox, maybe it'd be good to submit a bug report to Mozilla directly.
Interesting. I don't suppose you've got app.update.url.override set in your config settings?
Either way issues seem to be sporadic. I'm working hard to make sure aggressive optimisations aren't made on code that needs to be very stable or precise.

search data charities sold too
search data to companies charities sold too
money to waterfox charities give ?

why data sell ? violated feel by this mad.gif

happy not change patience was waterfox not use again change come waterfox security important not waterfox update slow.
post #6834 of 7360
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjpjimmy View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrAlex View Post

Haven't managed to test any exotic refresh rates such as those. What exactly happens?

I don't have a video/image of this since I don't have anything to use silverlight at the moment but these video show a similar effect (albeit on Google Chrome, but the behavior is same for firefox)... The entire screen (one playing the video) goes into full screen static. Closing plugin container via task manager closes the full screen static.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ijD3KwuHKGg
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=idY8QswoxGs

 

Oh right I see, very strange!

Quote:
Originally Posted by malcomX View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrAlex View Post

I'll err, have a look into it.


If you can reproduce it in Firefox, maybe it'd be good to submit a bug report to Mozilla directly.
Interesting. I don't suppose you've got app.update.url.override set in your config settings?
Either way issues seem to be sporadic. I'm working hard to make sure aggressive optimisations aren't made on code that needs to be very stable or precise.

search data charities sold too
search data to companies charities sold too
money to waterfox charities give ?

why data sell ? violated feel by this mad.gif

happy not change patience was waterfox not use again change come waterfox security important not waterfox update slow.

 

I don't understand? No data is collected? At all? It's going to be similar to StartPage or DuckDuckGo, but instead of the money going to them, it'll mostly be going to charity and a bit to Waterfox?

Also you're not even being forced to use it? This is a chance to actually make some good on the web.

 

Also I've been working 3 days straight on the latest update, but Mozilla have changed a lot and I'm working my best to get the build out.

    
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post #6835 of 7360
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrAlex View Post

Oh right I see, very strange!

I don't understand? No data is collected? At all? It's going to be similar to StartPage or DuckDuckGo, but instead of the money going to them, it'll mostly be going to charity and a bit to Waterfox?
Also you're not even being forced to use it? This is a chance to actually make some good on the web.

Also I've been working 3 days straight on the latest update, but Mozilla have changed a lot and I'm working my best to get the build out.

data collected below see


What is a tracking cookie?

Like every type of program out there, there are versions of cookies that present a risk to the safety of information you enter online. These are known as tracking cookies — specialized versions of cookies that record your entries and report them back to wherever the cookies' designer wants your data to go.


How do cookies work?

A regular cookie is essentially a small text file, sometimes only a few kilobytes in size, which contains options the page will load for you upon subsequent visits.

For example, if you turn the SafeSearch option to "high" or "off" in Google, your Web browser would edit the cookie for google.com with a bit of text that tells the Google website to set the SafeSearch option to your setting. However, instead of being held on Google's servers, the cookies are stored on your computer.

That's because servers that host websites already contain massive amounts of data. If the settings for every user who came to each website were stored on Web servers, many site servers would quickly run out of storage space. This is why the load is spread out among individual visitors.

What do tracking cookies do differently?

A tracking cookie takes the regular cookie process one step further and sends a log of your online activities, usually tied to your Internet Protocol (IP) address, to a remote database for analysis. Many tracking cookies are benign and want only to use your information, along with the data of millions of other anonymous users, for marketing analysis.

However, some cookies are designed by programmers to send specific user information, which can include names and addresses, out to the tracker host.

If the host recognizes a cookie on the browser whenever an ad or page is loaded, it can send the record of your visit to the logs and more precisely target you with ads geared to your next visit. Some ads will even address you by name and mention your location.

To many Web users, such practices are an invasion of privacy, and naturally lead to concerns about whom the ad companies are sharing personal data with.

The federal government is moving forward with a "Do Not Track" proposal that would let people control exactly what they divulge online. Most Web browsers have made Do Not Track an optional feature that users can switch on, but most websites don't honor it.
post #6836 of 7360
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by malcomX View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrAlex View Post

Oh right I see, very strange!

I don't understand? No data is collected? At all? It's going to be similar to StartPage or DuckDuckGo, but instead of the money going to them, it'll mostly be going to charity and a bit to Waterfox?
Also you're not even being forced to use it? This is a chance to actually make some good on the web.

Also I've been working 3 days straight on the latest update, but Mozilla have changed a lot and I'm working my best to get the build out.

data collected below see


What is a tracking cookie?

Like every type of program out there, there are versions of cookies that present a risk to the safety of information you enter online. These are known as tracking cookies — specialized versions of cookies that record your entries and report them back to wherever the cookies' designer wants your data to go.


How do cookies work?

A regular cookie is essentially a small text file, sometimes only a few kilobytes in size, which contains options the page will load for you upon subsequent visits.

For example, if you turn the SafeSearch option to "high" or "off" in Google, your Web browser would edit the cookie for google.com with a bit of text that tells the Google website to set the SafeSearch option to your setting. However, instead of being held on Google's servers, the cookies are stored on your computer.

That's because servers that host websites already contain massive amounts of data. If the settings for every user who came to each website were stored on Web servers, many site servers would quickly run out of storage space. This is why the load is spread out among individual visitors.

What do tracking cookies do differently?

A tracking cookie takes the regular cookie process one step further and sends a log of your online activities, usually tied to your Internet Protocol (IP) address, to a remote database for analysis. Many tracking cookies are benign and want only to use your information, along with the data of millions of other anonymous users, for marketing analysis.

However, some cookies are designed by programmers to send specific user information, which can include names and addresses, out to the tracker host.

If the host recognizes a cookie on the browser whenever an ad or page is loaded, it can send the record of your visit to the logs and more precisely target you with ads geared to your next visit. Some ads will even address you by name and mention your location.

To many Web users, such practices are an invasion of privacy, and naturally lead to concerns about whom the ad companies are sharing personal data with.

The federal government is moving forward with a "Do Not Track" proposal that would let people control exactly what they divulge online. Most Web browsers have made Do Not Track an optional feature that users can switch on, but most websites don't honor it.

 

I think you should consider the rest of the article. Nowhere did I state we'd be using tracking cookies. Also don't forget we're in the EU and there are cookie laws we MUST adhere to. Read more here and here. Basically because we'll be a legal entity in the UK, we have to describe exactly how the cookie (just one) is used and the user has to accept before they can use the search engine. It's as simple as that. This was done to prevent things such as the immoral tracking cookies.

    
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post #6837 of 7360
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrAlex View Post

How can we trust the search engine?

None of your personal information is kept (everything is anonymous). In fact, we don’t even ask for any (and none of your searches are stored anywhere)! The only thing that happens is that a cookie will be stored, which will hold the data for the charitable donation to be managed. That’s it!

that cookie tracking
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrAlex View Post

I think you should consider the rest of the article. Nowhere did I state we'd be using tracking cookies. Also don't forget we're in the EU and there are cookie laws we MUST adhere to. Read more here and here. Basically because we'll be a legal entity in the UK, we have to describe exactly how the cookie (just one) is used and the user has to accept before they can use the search engine. It's as simple as that. This was done to prevent things such as the immoral tracking cookies.

ok uk not world policy different still tracking cookie
why not patreon kickstarter
not sell data
post #6838 of 7360
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by malcomX View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrAlex View Post

How can we trust the search engine?

None of your personal information is kept (everything is anonymous). In fact, we don’t even ask for any (and none of your searches are stored anywhere)! The only thing that happens is that a cookie will be stored, which will hold the data for the charitable donation to be managed. That’s it!

that cookie tracking
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrAlex View Post

I think you should consider the rest of the article. Nowhere did I state we'd be using tracking cookies. Also don't forget we're in the EU and there are cookie laws we MUST adhere to. Read more here and here. Basically because we'll be a legal entity in the UK, we have to describe exactly how the cookie (just one) is used and the user has to accept before they can use the search engine. It's as simple as that. This was done to prevent things such as the immoral tracking cookies.

ok uk not world policy different still tracking cookie
why not patreon kickstarter
not sell data

 

The cookie will hold what charity the donation goes to. That's it. And yes that's true except because we're in the UK we'll follow UK law.

I don't get what's hard to understand?

    
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post #6839 of 7360
I'm ok with the Charity concept. It appears to be an elegant solution to help Waterfox out. I'm not to concerned about the Waterfox cookie, It's the cookies that almost every other website that's out there use that I would be focusing on.

Good luck with your new initiative.
post #6840 of 7360
Thread Starter 

Hi everyone so here is a 37.0.1 test build.

 

Sorry for being a few days late with this build, Mozilla disabled support for Visual Studio 2010 and introduced many C++11 features which broke the old build system I was using, so it took me a while to fix all the issues!

This includes all the changes and security features in Firefox 37.0 and 37.0.1 as well as all the general Waterfox improvements :)

If there are any XP and Vista 64-bit users would be great to know how Waterfox runs on your systems.

As always please let me know of any issues you have!

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by chorse View Post

I'm ok with the Charity concept. It appears to be an elegant solution to help Waterfox out. I'm not to concerned about the Waterfox cookie, It's the cookies that almost every other website that's out there use that I would be focusing on.

Good luck with your new initiative.

 

Thanks for your feedback! I appreciate it.

    
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