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Wiring Ethernet in New House [Help] - Page 2

post #11 of 16
Draw a diagram of EVERYTHING. Even if its not precise having it can make the difference between being OK'd and having to rip it all out.

Dunno where you live but building inspectors around here are hellish and don't care if you own the place or not. I got cleared for replacing a breaker box and discovered my wiring still had aluminum so I replaced every millimeter of the house and drew it up carefully. Inspector loved it and signed off right then.

Also, be aware of pest control concerns. Just get some "great stuff" from local hardware and fill any gaps you made to pass wires through by running a twist of plastic wrap up the wire then using a cardboard shield to keep the insulation in place while it dries.
post #12 of 16
I wired homes for about 6 years, some of the largest, most expensive homes in all of Colorado, actually.


Some tips:
  • Black Sharpie. Label Each wire pull. That way at your termination panel you know what is what, and it will make life easier if you know which cable to re-terminate if something goes wrong.
  • START at the room the wire is in, and wire directly to the termination point (where your patch panel will be).
  • Stay 3-4 feet away from any electrical wires for any length greater than 12 feet.
  • If you have to cross any electrical wires, make sure it's at 90 degree angles, and make sure to stay as far from it as possible. This will also eliminate any electrical interference.
  • Stay off of plumbing pipes. No matter what, do not lay your wire on them, wrap around them, etc.
  • Do not drill through house support beams. Usually they are made of VERY thick wood. Drilling through it will automatically cause any inspector to flag the house unlivable.
  • Try to get the wire pulled AFTER inspection is done. The reason, you're not licensed or work for an A/V company. and superintendents don't usually like home owners running their own stuff.

I hope that helps. I would also avoid staples and go with nail-ins as you're less likely to pinch a wire. Also, make sure each box on the wall is the same level as the electrical boxes in the room.

Other than that, have fun.
post #13 of 16
In addition to all of the above, get a toner wand. Use this to help label your cables. Get a cable tester, as well.

EDIT: If you don't already have them, get some zip ties. They are invaluable for this kind of work.
Edited by Shadowrunner340 - 4/9/11 at 2:13pm
post #14 of 16
can i also suggest, if you plan to make a project of this, to lay trunking instead of staples, as this comes in useful later if you want to add a phone faceplate or another powerpoint or anything else of that sort later. It also stops wear and tear on the cables and makes the whole setup more aesthetically pleasing. Obviously this would take time but you know, if a jobs worth doing its worth doing right.

Also, at the patch panel (before wiring into it) leave a fair amount of slack on the cable as the worst thing in the world is finding out the wiring on one end of the cable is a no-go... the slack means you can cut and try again
Edited by Noctizzle - 4/9/11 at 2:18pm
post #15 of 16
Already mentioned above, but a few thigns I learned from helping my dad wire our house:

- definitely draw a diagram of how you want everything laid out. It will save time and you can use it as a reference card in the future.
- label all of the wires so you don't spend time later trying to figure out which is which.
- tape a piece of string along each cable to use as a snake for future cables (or use tubing so you can push multiple cables through quickly)

Does the house have tv/cable wired through it? When we installed our networking we taped a Cat5 cable to the end of the coax wire (for pulling back through), pulled the coax wire down to the distributor (where our router went), taped another Cat5 wire to the coax cable, then pulled it all back through so the Cat5 ran alongside the coax. It saved a lot of time over just dropping a cable through the studs and trying to find it, and we found 2-on-1 faceplates with both a TV jack and Cat5 (didn't need to cut drywall and install additional in-wall boxes).

Good luck with the project.
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The Byte Mogul
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post #16 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by spartacus View Post
Does the house have tv/cable wired through it? When we installed our networking we taped a Cat5 cable to the end of the coax wire (for pulling back through), pulled the coax wire down to the distributor (where our router went), taped another Cat5 wire to the coax cable, then pulled it all back through so the Cat5 ran alongside the coax. It saved a lot of time over just dropping a cable through the studs and trying to find it, and we found 2-on-1 faceplates with both a TV jack and Cat5 (didn't need to cut drywall and install additional in-wall boxes).
The house does have phone/tv wired. I'll keep this tip in mind. Thank you!
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