post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rokabud View Post
Yes I think I understand watts/ current. Amps and volts is where things get fuzzy.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I understand it like this (I think I read this analogy on wikipedia,)

If electricity were water flowing through plumbing pipes, the amps would be the rate the water was moving and the volts would be the water pressure. I was confused when I read that analogy because I figured that electricity would travel at the speed of light. I'm hoping that's not an incredibly naive assumption =S

Also in the analogy, the wattage/current is analogized to the diameter of the pipe carrying it. But this doesn't make since, dice I've also heard that wattage is a product of the amps and volts (amps * volts= watts, correct?)

Also, it seems to me that in the case of amps and volts in that analogy, the voltage (water pressure) would have a direct result on the amps (rate of flow). But nothing like that is mentioned, so im assuming they're totally independent.

And, in the context of computers/ overclocking, I haven't heard amps mentioned at all. Just voltage and wattage. Why is this?
Voltage is the potential for the electricity to be powerful. It is indeed hard to understand. At 3.3V, it is much harder to carry a lot of current than it is at 12V.

(Current = Amps, by the way).

Volts and Amps are related directly. One way they are related is in the calculation of watts. Watts = Volts x Amps. (12V @ 2A = 24W). They are also related in Ohms Law

You don't overvolt because the potential for too much power is too great. Amps might not be used because the voltage usually remains constant, ie 12V. So if everything is 12V, then it is all relative.

RE: The Amperage analogy.

Current (Amps) is physically the amount of electricity being transported. (Imagine the water was not moving at all.) It is a measurement of the amount of water.

Voltage is the force that is pushing this water through the pipe. Voltage cannot be measured in an "amount" or a "mass" though. It is just a force and a measurement of the circuits potential.

But keep this in mind. Lower voltage does not mean lower current (amps). You can have a circuit that uses 3V @ 10A, and you can have a circuit that uses 12V @ 1A.

Hard to explain. Sorry.
Edited by TheLaw - 4/17/11 at 8:29pm
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Unlawful
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD Athlon II X4 620 ASUS M4A785G-M EVO XFX ATI HD4650 4GB G.Skill Ripjaws DDR3 1333 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOS
Samsung 830 Seagate Barracude 7200.12 Samsung F3 1TB Windows 7 Home x64 
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Seasonic M12-II 430W Modular Cooler Master Elite 332 
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