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post #41 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by RonindeBeatrice View Post
Why does everyone bring up long road trips when discussions about electric cars are brought up?

I agree that the mileage of an electric should be ~100 miles to satisfy most anyone's daily commutes, beyond that, if you're traveling out of town, just get a rental and don't put the mileage on your car.

That said, induction charging is stupid. The loss is unreal in something you're trying to make as efficient as possible (I thought that was the point of electrics anyway).

Just plug the damn thing in. It's not terribly hard to do.
Screw that, I did 3300 km this winter each way, and plan to do it again next winter. Electric just doesn't work, and I need my car at the end to use and I'm too young to rent a car anyways.

I think a better way to get around all this BS is just make the batteries in cars easily removable and able to be changed out with fresh ones in a couple minutes with an automated system. Then there's like 5 different configurations of batteries, for different applications (ie a sports car has a dense, small, battery array that can be discharged quickly for the POWERRRRR, a minivan has a large one with less fancy, cheaper batteries, etc). Stop at the "gas station", a guy comes out, uses some apparatus to change out the batteries, and then drive. The initial cost of the batteries will be built into the cost of the vehicle, the cost of maintaining healthy batteries is built into what you pay the "gas station".
    
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post #42 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by angrysasquatch View Post
Screw that, I did 3300 km this winter each way, and plan to do it again next winter. Electric just doesn't work, and I need my car at the end to use and I'm too young to rent a car anyways.

I think a better way to get around all this BS is just make the batteries in cars easily removable and able to be changed out with fresh ones in a couple minutes with an automated system. Then there's like 5 different configurations of batteries, for different applications (ie a sports car has a dense, small, battery array that can be discharged quickly for the POWERRRRR, a minivan has a large one with less fancy, cheaper batteries, etc). Stop at the "gas station", a guy comes out, uses some apparatus to change out the batteries, and then drive. The initial cost of the batteries will be built into the cost of the vehicle, the cost of maintaining healthy batteries is built into what you pay the "gas station".
It's not the worst idea, but TBH, it would require that auto manufacturers adopted standards, and simultaneously designed the batteries to be accessible.

You're not going to get manufacturers to use just a handful of battery types, even if there were a few smaller types which would work like legos in a lot of different configurations there's the problem of...

Making them accessible. One of the many auxiliary benefits of batteries is that they can be positioned low in the vehicle and lower the cars center of gravity. They can also be configured dispersed throughout the vehicle to improve the rear/forward balance. Neither of these lend well to making a battery easy to access, such that you could just pull over and get a new set in a few minutes.

If we lived in a different world, where everyone drove one of three cars and didn't mind rolling over because the batteries were perched atop.
    
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post #43 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by guyladouche View Post

If hydrogen fuel cell research were given as much attention and money that lobbyists threw at biofuel research (specifically corn and soybean), it would advance so much faster, and break out of the "fringe" tech that people laugh at. But the problem is that once you "solve" the efficient splitting of water with just light and simple catalysts (that already work on the lab-scale), there's nothing to sustain a huge industry like farming/cultivation, 'cause all you'll need is water (and whatever sort of catalysts that are needed). The biggest plus for hydrogen fuel cell tech. is that there's no reason for expensive and inefficient reactions to break down plant matter, store the fuel, transport it, etc. It all comes down to money and how special interests will benefit from it financially, and nothing to do with the best decision for more efficient transportation mechanisms.
You can't split water with simple catalysts. It goes against thermodynamics. Catalysts, by definition, simply lower the activation energy of a reaction. They cannot change the energy difference between the reactants and products. H2 and O2 are higher energy molecules than H20.

That's like saying you can get water to flow uphill if you have the right kind of catalyst... Hydrogen is the gimmick. The energy in hydrogen is from some other source. Hydrogen isn't the fuel.

You completely glossed over where the clean renewable electricity that makes the hydrogen will come from as if that is the easy part and just talked about the hydrogen...

Also, about the alternative biofuels I talked about. Did I mention that they work in current vehicle designs with little to no modification. Biodiesel works in diesels and ethanol works in gasoline cars. The entire population doesn't have to switch to some sort of new vehicle.

How much energy is involved in changing 100% of the transportation infrastructure? Another factoid glossed over by your idea...
Edited by Epitope - 4/15/11 at 2:32pm
    
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