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1000w Overkill? maximum reading 170w. - Page 2

post #11 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phaedrus2129 View Post
He might get close with two 6990s, but that's about all I can think of that wouldn't require motherboard/CPU replacement as well.
Yeah and how much people on normal paychecks have you seen with Crossfired 6990s?
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post #12 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phaedrus2129 View Post
Meter is probably being fooled by the power supply's power factor correction.

You're probably pulling ~400-450W from the wall, maybe 350W from the PSU.
Can you explain that further?

My roommate's system which is fairly close to his pulls between 120 and 250w at the wall.

Mine goes from 180 to uh.. 460w >.> when it's maxed out.
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post #13 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mootsfox View Post
Can you explain that further?

My roommate's system which is fairly close to his pulls between 120 and 250w at the wall.

Mine goes from 180 to uh.. 460w >.> when it's maxed out.
Which, my power estimate or the meter being fooled?
post #14 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phaedrus2129 View Post
He might get close with two 6990s, but that's about all I can think of that wouldn't require motherboard/CPU replacement as well.
Yeah i would say 850-900 in games at the very most if OP had such a quad setup.
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post #15 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mootsfox View Post
Can you explain that further?

My roommate's system which is fairly close to his pulls between 120 and 250w at the wall.

Mine goes from 180 to uh.. 460w >.> when it's maxed out.
Well it's hard to explain exactly what PFC (Power factor correction) exactly is. Wikipedia is your friend.

But essentially, in order for switchmode PSUs to work correctly, the incoming sine waves need to be "corrected" so that the waves are very similar to the AC current. When the sine waves are at their optimal frequency, the power supply can be more efficient and supply more power. It's a hard thing to explain without getting into electrical theory.

But anyway, the way an active PFC circuit works, this alteration in the wave structure can throw the Kill-A-Watt meter off.

It doesn't always happen. It might depend upon the particular design of the PFC circuit. You could also have a bad meter.
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post #16 of 29
Quote:
But essentially, in order for switchmode PSUs to work correctly, the incoming sine waves need to be "corrected" so that the waves are very similar to the AC current. When the sine waves are at their optimal frequency, the power supply can be more efficient and supply more power. It's a hard thing to explain without getting into electrical theory.
Actually PFC does nothing to improve a PSU's efficiency, stability, wattage, or anything like that. It's there to correct the input voltage and current becoming out of sync. Alternating current is like a sine wave, and non-resistive loads (like those presented by capacitors, inductors, and transistors) can cause the voltage and current waveforms to become out of sync. This *basically* means that a higher current is pulled for a given wattage load, without average voltage decreasing. That higher current is called "apparent power". The ratio between apparent power and real power is called the power factor, and power factor correction corrects power factor, by re-syncing the current and voltage waveforms.

Cheap power/voltage/current measuring devices make certain assumptions when measuring those numbers. For instance, they may measure the angle of current waveform, rather than directly measuring it. If so, and if the active PFC used in a PSU causes a slight change in angle at that point (since the PFC isn't perfect--usually .980-.999) then that may cause the meter to be way off in its readings.

In 90% of cases a cheap power meter reading draw from an APFC PSU will read 1-5% low, occasionally up to 10% low. On rare occasions it may read 15-20% low.
post #17 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phaedrus2129 View Post
He couldn't get anywhere close to 1000W without basically replacing every component in his system.
This is true, but the PSU will always be there for future hardware generations
post #18 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by E-Peen View Post
This is true, but the PSU will always be there for future hardware generations
And you or someone with a similar opinion will be there to recommend that he upgrade his PSU so that he's future proof for the next generation.
post #19 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phaedrus2129 View Post
Actually PFC does nothing to improve a PSU's efficiency, stability, wattage, or anything like that. It's there to correct the input voltage and current becoming out of sync. Alternating current is like a sine wave, and non-resistive loads (like those presented by capacitors, inductors, and transistors) can cause the voltage and current waveforms to become out of sync. This *basically* means that a higher current is pulled for a given wattage load, without average voltage decreasing. That higher current is called "apparent power". The ratio between apparent power and real power is called the power factor, and power factor correction corrects power factor, by re-syncing the current and voltage waveforms.

Cheap power/voltage/current measuring devices make certain assumptions when measuring those numbers. For instance, they may measure the angle of current waveform, rather than directly measuring it. If so, and if the active PFC used in a PSU causes a slight change in angle at that point (since the PFC isn't perfect--usually .980-.999) then that may cause the meter to be way off in its readings.

In 90% of cases a cheap power meter reading draw from an APFC PSU will read 1-5% low, occasionally up to 10% low. On rare occasions it may read 15-20% low.
Ehh. I guess I've been misinformed. I've never actually used a switching design in any of my projects...nor have most hobbyists.
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post #20 of 29
Could someone take a look at this:

Checked my absolute max last night with OCCT, PSU test (stress cpu and gpu to 100%. And got a reading of max 941W at the wall. Given a 80% maybe 70% efficiency this would mean 750-650w, could this be right?

Q9650 @ 4.2 | 1.34v
GTX 570 @ 860/2055 | 1.038v
Swiftech MCR 655 pump.
5x Sata hdd's
1x SSD
6x Scythe GT15's
4x Other 1500rpm fans
1x 230mm fan

I would be really amazed if this draws anything near 600W under load.
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