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ACHI Advantages? - Page 2

post #11 of 17
i dont know about ACHI but i know AHCI has quite a few
     
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CPUCPUMotherboardGraphics
Xeon x5650 Xeon X5650 EVGA Classified SR2 EVGA GTX 680 FTW 
GraphicsRAMHard DriveHard Drive
EVGA GTX 680 FTW 24 GB DDR3 1600Mhz C9 1 TB WD Black 1 TB WD Black 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
1 TB WD Black 1 TB WD Black Kington Hyper X 3k 120GB OCZ Vertex 3 120GB 
OSPower
Windows 8 Cooler Master Silent Pro Hybrid 1050w 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
3930k Intel ES ASrock X79 Extreme4-m GTX 680 16GB 1600Mhz DDR3 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveCooling
240GB Samsung EVO SSD 2TB WD Green DVDrw Cooler Master Nepton 240m 
OSPowerCase
Windows 7 Ultmate Cooler Master VS550 Cooler Master Silencio 352 
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post #12 of 17
NCQ is a big advantage of AHCI.
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by XSCounter View Post
What about single drive in RAID mode? Is it better than AHCI?
Sorry XSCounter but RAID stands for Redundant Array of Independent Disks. Notice that its plural lol. So you can't really raid with one disk RAID 0 will be faster than AHCI but you need two identical disks. RAID 5 is good but you need three disks, and you loose the storage of one because its used for parity bits (helps stop data corruption) Or you could do RAID 0+1 were you have two identical drives in RAID 0 and then one drive equal to the total size of the array. Like two 500GB drives in raid 0 and a 1tb for the +1 so you get backups and speed!
post #14 of 17
From what I understand, and I may be mistaken, the main advantages to AHCI are that

1. It makes drives hot swappable
2. If the disk needed to read/write at points A, B, and C, if C is closer to A than B is it will read/write in the order "A C B" instead of writing in order "A B C" to decrease the time it takes to read/write things.

Sorry if my explanation sucks but I hope I helped.
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by timma100 View Post
Sorry XSCounter but RAID stands for Redundant Array of Independent Disks. Notice that its plural lol. So you can't really raid with one disk RAID 0 will be faster than AHCI but you need two identical disks. RAID 5 is good but you need three disks, and you loose the storage of one because its used for parity bits (helps stop data corruption) Or you could do RAID 0+1 were you have two identical drives in RAID 0 and then one drive equal to the total size of the array. Like two 500GB drives in raid 0 and a 1tb for the +1 so you get backups and speed!
Sorry timma, but you can run single drive RAID0 arrays without issue.

Doing so is effectively the same as runninh in AHCI though, with the important disadvantage that you may be unable to move your disk to another controller and read it properly - RAID mode will write additional metadata to the drive that defines the RAID properties, and this may not be compatibile with any other controller you may want to move the drive to in the future (although the vast majority of controllers will read each other's RAID0 arrays, things get less transportable with RAID5 etc though. It's also worth noting ALL the recent (last 8 years or so) of Intel's controllers will read each others RAID metadata too).

Also for RAID0+1 (and the better RAID10), you need 4 drives, you can't do it with 3 as you propose.

And RAID5 does not really have parity for corruption - it has it to protect against drive failure. The parity data can actually cause corruption issues due to the way RAID5 deals with small writes. Running parity checks can help identify and mitigate issues due to bad sectors etc, but it's not something to rely on.
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by the_beast View Post
Sorry timma, but you can run single drive RAID0 arrays without issue.

Doing so is effectively the same as runninh in AHCI though, with the important disadvantage that you may be unable to move your disk to another controller and read it properly - RAID mode will write additional metadata to the drive that defines the RAID properties, and this may not be compatibile with any other controller you may want to move the drive to in the future (although the vast majority of controllers will read each other's RAID0 arrays, things get less transportable with RAID5 etc though. It's also worth noting ALL the recent (last 8 years or so) of Intel's controllers will read each others RAID metadata too).

Also for RAID0+1 (and the better RAID10), you need 4 drives, you can't do it with 3 as you propose.

And RAID5 does not really have parity for corruption - it has it to protect against drive failure. The parity data can actually cause corruption issues due to the way RAID5 deals with small writes. Running parity checks can help identify and mitigate issues due to bad sectors etc, but it's not something to rely on.
You are completely right, my mistake. Sorry for the misinformation OP.
post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by the_beast View Post
Doing so is effectively the same as runninh in AHCI though, with the important disadvantage that you may be unable to move your disk to another controller and read it properly - RAID mode will write additional metadata to the drive that defines the RAID properties, and this may not be compatibile with any other controller you may want to move the drive to in the future
Very interesting point. Coz I couldn't find any disadvantage on any forum of running single (non-member) drive in RAID mode rather than AHCI. I could only find one advantage of RAID over AHCI is that in case I want to add another drive to RAID array, it would be easier if I am already in RAID mode.

In terms of productivity, I ran a few benchmarks and I got identical speeds for my HDD and SDD in both AHCI and RAID mode. So I think I will stick with RAID for now.
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