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[Xbit] Intel Considers to Bundle Liquid Cooling Solution with Next-Generation... - Page 5

post #41 of 75
H50? Why not H70?
Noctua NH-D14 does better anyways.
post #42 of 75
I somehow sure that this is going to be another rebranded Asetek/CoolIT product with Intel's sticker on it
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post #43 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Epitope View Post
Why not just skip including a heatsink altogether and let the enthusiast get the chip by itself? I imagine the majority of people who buy the extreme processors simply ignore the included heatsink anyways. Not including a heatsink would allow them to slightly lower the price. If the included cooler is anything short of absolutely amazing then including it is pointless and will only drive up the price.

I still think extreme series chips should come with silver heatspreaders instead of copper. I'm sure they could give the chips a silver heatspreader for the same price as a bundled H50. The silver heatspreader would enhance the cooling of whatever cooling solution the user chooses. Silver is about 15% more conductive than copper.
At 68°F, Pure silver is only 5% more thermally conductive than Pure Copper. Source

Pure Silver=235 Btu/(hr*°F*ft) at 68°F
Pure Copper=223 Btu/(hr*°F*ft) at 68°F

235/223=1.05

The added cost of using truly pure silver has been proven to be non-economical for the added gain hence why Intel hasn't used it for an added benefit on all CPUs. I see what you're saying about the extremes only, but they would have to essentially make an additional manufactering step just to switch out copper for silver, offset the additional cost of the silver, and hope that they can get the same level of control with the press that they have with copper.


Even with this said, a 5% theoretical increase in thermal conductivity doesn't yield a 5% drop in temperatures. I would put money on seeing a 1% drop on the low side and a 3% drop on the very high side (and at load. Idle I doubt would see much difference at all). A 3% drop at extreme load would only be 97°C instead of 100°C and even then any cooler that would allow the chip to get up that high is not able to keep up with the thermal load the CPU is putting out. At that point, is it the copper's fault or the inadequete CPU coolers fault?

tl;dr Silver over copper=Added cost with minimal if any gains.
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post #44 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChickenInferno View Post
At 68°F, Pure silver is only 5% more thermally conductive than Pure Copper. Source

Pure Silver=235 Btu/(hr*°F*ft) at 68°F
Pure Copper=223 Btu/(hr*°F*ft) at 68°F

235/223=1.05

The added cost of using truly pure silver has been proven to be non-economical for the added gain hence why Intel hasn't used it for an added benefit on all CPUs. I see what you're saying about the extremes only, but they would have to essentially make an additional manufactering step just to switch out copper for silver, offset the additional cost of the silver, and hope that they can get the same level of control with the press that they have with copper.


Even with this said, a 5% theoretical increase in thermal conductivity doesn't yield a 5% drop in temperatures. I would put money on seeing a 1% drop on the low side and a 3% drop on the very high side (and at load. Idle I doubt would see much difference at all). A 3% drop at extreme load would only be 97°C instead of 100°C and even then any cooler that would allow the chip to get up that high is not able to keep up with the thermal load the CPU is putting out. At that point, is it the copper's fault or the inadequete CPU coolers fault?

tl;dr Silver over copper=Added cost with minimal if any gains.
Even copper prices are skyrocketing. GPU manufacturers are using this excuse for using aluminum in their heatsinks now.
post #45 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4Brand View Post
Why expensive? I don't think an included H50 will make a big difference in price for a $1000 chip.
True but then Intel would have to augment their warranty. Remember, as of right now, your warranty is only valid if you're using the stock Intel heatsink that comes with the CPU. If they include a Liquid Cooling Kit, they'll have to warranty it. The problem, albeit not a big one, is that there's always a potential for leakage. The probability maybe small but it's still there. In those kinds of cases, Intel would have to be liable for all the damage.

Personally, I think they should skip it and stick with the stock air coolers or just get a new OEM stock cooler for better performance.
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post #46 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by KamuiRSX View Post
True but then Intel would have to augment their warranty. Remember, as of right now, your warranty is only valid if you're using the stock Intel heatsink that comes with the CPU. If they include a Liquid Cooling Kit, they'll have to warranty it. The problem, albeit not a big one, is that there's always a potential for leakage. The probability maybe small but it's still there. In those kinds of cases, Intel would have to be liable for all the damage.

Personally, I think they should skip it and stick with the stock air coolers or just get a new OEM stock cooler for better performance.
Excessive leakage is never a good sign. Please consult your doctor for more details.





But OT: Yes, I think this idea of a watercooled stock heatsink is just silly.
post #47 of 75
I gave this some thought, and a lc setup and warranty would be an issue. I deal with the public and I know for sure there would be no stupid test to buy one of these. It could be a nightmare. Send them out like Fermi, hot as hell and get the word out in forums how sweet they run wet.

I also wasn't flaming the h50 or h70 earlier, they do wonders for some. Just not here in the summer.
post #48 of 75
I sense a BTX moment coming...
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post #49 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by HAF_wit View Post
If I'm paying 1,000 dollars for a CPU I would much prefer to spend the extra 75-100 on a nice water block or air cooler that I *know* has been tested and performs the way I want it to.
Implying that Intel wouldn't ever test the waterblocks they provide with the CPUs? You must be kidding me.
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post #50 of 75
Quote:
Intel Corp. is considering to bundle a liquid cooling solution with its next-generation enthusiast-class central processing units (CPUs) code-named Sandy Bridge E (SNB-E). The liquid-based cooler will allow Intel’s Extreme Edition (XE) microprocessors to work at even higher frequencies and thus offer higher performance overall.
wut? lol
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