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post #24861 of 40650 (permalink) Old 07-29-2017, 05:36 PM
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I appreciate your time smile.gif .

The above run lasted ~73min, I then manually stopped.



Then I did a rerun.



Y-Cruncher v0.7.2.9469 and v0.7.2.9468 give me more consistent results.

For now I will stick with using v0.7.2.9469.
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post #24862 of 40650 (permalink) Old 07-29-2017, 05:46 PM
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Did any of you conected an AIO through BIOS/Board management?
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post #24863 of 40650 (permalink) Old 07-29-2017, 05:50 PM
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@Mysticial

I appreciate your time smile.gif .

The above run lasted ~73min, I then manually stopped.



Then I did a rerun.



Y-Cruncher v0.7.2.9469 and v0.7.2.9468 give me more consistent results.

For now I will stick with using v0.7.2.9469.

I went ahead an added these changes to the next patch:
  1. If a thread fails to bind to a core, it prints a warning.
  2. If a stress-test thread hits an error, it prints it out immediately. So you'll know something happened.

No ETA yet on when the v0.7.3.9473 patch will be released. I'm still working on the problems that y-cruncher currently has on Threadripper and Epyc*. And I plan to push out all the fixes together.

*There's some BS with having multiple NUMA nodes per socket that's wrecking absolute havoc on the Linux binaries.
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post #24864 of 40650 (permalink) Old 07-29-2017, 05:52 PM
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post #24865 of 40650 (permalink) Old 07-29-2017, 06:05 PM
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Just to close this hanging question: In Unigine Superposition, towards the end of the benchmark, there is a scene of a desk with a burning cigarette. Left of the cigarette is a blue-gray box bottom containing a black meter assembly, with a set of leads that look like they culminate in a probe. Edit: This could be a thermocouple meter. I haven't figured out how to get close enough in game mode to read the meter markings. Close inspection reveals it is a volt-amp meter of ancient design. There is a second one on a desk to the right. I have pretty well trashed the entire lab in game mode looking, but haven't found a thermocouple meter. I was looking for something like this:


That's because he was using RTD's... biggrin.gif
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post #24866 of 40650 (permalink) Old 07-29-2017, 06:19 PM
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Just to close this hanging question: In Unigine Superposition, towards the end of the benchmark, there is a scene of a desk with a burning cigarette. Left of the cigarette is a blue-gray box bottom containing a black meter assembly, with a set of leads that look like they culminate in a probe. Edit: This could be a thermocouple meter. I haven't figured out how to get close enough in game mode to read the meter markings. Close inspection reveals it is a volt-amp meter of ancient design. There is a second one on a desk to the right. I have pretty well trashed the entire lab in game mode looking, but haven't found a thermocouple meter. I was looking for something like this:


That's because he was using RTD's... biggrin.gif

Heh. Thanks for the insight. There were several historical devices in that lab so I had hope. Note the Tektronix 'scope clone without any name.

Rig running Ryzen [email protected] GHz, [email protected] MT/s, Linux Mint 18.1 on Asus C6H
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post #24867 of 40650 (permalink) Old 07-29-2017, 06:30 PM
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Heh. Thanks for the insight. There were several historical devices in that lab so I had hope. Note the Tektronix 'scope clone without any name.

Not only that, he had removed the blue or green filter in front of the CRT phosphor (which heightens contrast when mounted) and which was done usually for one of two reasons: either the CRT is getting dim, or for photography since it made the trace a little brighter and with the hood on there was no light on the tube face anyway, lol.

Most of the stuff in that lab screams 1970's to me -- I was actually working in electronics in the 1970's and that looks like it might have been the time shown. The scope actually looks a little small for the time and maybe places it later? I guess it was like late 70's the Tektronix 465's were around and I had one. I just gave my last one away to a guy last year and I don't have any analog scopes any more at home, just an inexpensive Rigol digital.

But in most labs, you'd find an assortment of stuff. We had an old tube-type differential voltmeter that still worked well (if you let it warm up for a loooongggg time) and so you could find anachronisms very easily I think in any lab, even today. Whoever did the design for that lab did a great job though in my opinion, it feels like another time with very little wrong. I wonder about the Wimshurst static generator on the desk though. Either a favorite curio of the engineer there, or I don't know what it would have been used for. In some ways, seeing things like that on the desk makes me think of high school or college labs, lol. Maybe that's what this was.

Did you notice in the final "floating" what doesn't take off like the coat and coat rack and some other things? I don't know if that's an oversight or there's a puzzle there to be figured out, like what could have been in the pockets, lol.

Mostly I work in software (automation) these days and don't need the facilities I once did. Kind of miss the old iron though.
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post #24868 of 40650 (permalink) Old 07-29-2017, 07:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kaseki View Post

Heh. Thanks for the insight. There were several historical devices in that lab so I had hope. Note the Tektronix 'scope clone without any name.

Not only that, he had removed the blue or green filter in front of the CRT phosphor (which heightens contrast when mounted) and which was done usually for one of two reasons: either the CRT is getting dim, or for photography since it made the trace a little brighter and with the hood on there was no light on the tube face anyway, lol.

Most of the stuff in that lab screams 1970's to me -- I was actually working in electronics in the 1970's and that looks like it might have been the time shown. The scope actually looks a little small for the time and maybe places it later? I guess it was like late 70's the Tektronix 465's were around and I had one. I just gave my last one away to a guy last year and I don't have any analog scopes any more at home, just an inexpensive Rigol digital.

But in most labs, you'd find an assortment of stuff. We had an old tube-type differential voltmeter that still worked well (if you let it warm up for a loooongggg time) and so you could find anachronisms very easily I think in any lab, even today. Whoever did the design for that lab did a great job though in my opinion, it feels like another time with very little wrong. I wonder about the Wimshurst static generator on the desk though. Either a favorite curio of the engineer there, or I don't know what it would have been used for. In some ways, seeing things like that on the desk makes me think of high school or college labs, lol. Maybe that's what this was.

Did you notice in the final "floating" what doesn't take off like the coat and coat rack and some other things? I don't know if that's an oversight or there's a puzzle there to be figured out, like what could have been in the pockets, lol.

Mostly I work in software (automation) these days and don't need the facilities I once did. Kind of miss the old iron though.

Yes, besides the coat, coat rack, and hat, I think, none of the desks move, even the school desks. Pretty selective anti-grav if you ask me. If you tour the lab in game mode, there are some gas tanks in one corner, with stuff in front of them covered in blankets. I couldn't find a way to uncover them. I'm not sure what the game actually is, or whether it is merely a demonstration of how potential gaming can be managed. It is easy to pick up some of the stuff on desks, but when released it goes flying. Some of it hits the floor and can't be further moved. Some things grabbed by the mouse and lifted can be transported through other objects as if they are textured but otherwise insubstantial wire frames (which of course, they are), but usually there are limits on physical objects intersecting each other. A mystery in an enigma.

P.S. I still have an HP audio meter that uses vacuum tubes and batteries (no hum). Now that I think of it, I'd better check it for battery auto destruction.

Rig running Ryzen [email protected] GHz, [email protected] MT/s, Linux Mint 18.1 on Asus C6H
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post #24869 of 40650 (permalink) Old 07-29-2017, 08:13 PM
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Yes, besides the coat, coat rack, and hat, I think, none of the desks move, even the school desks. Pretty selective anti-grav if you ask me. If you tour the lab in game mode, there are some gas tanks in one corner, with stuff in front of them covered in blankets. I couldn't find a way to uncover them. I'm not sure what the game actually is, or whether it is merely a demonstration of how potential gaming can be managed. It is easy to pick up some of the stuff on desks, but when released it goes flying. Some of it hits the floor and can't be further moved. Some things grabbed by the mouse and lifted can be transported through other objects as if they are textured but otherwise insubstantial wire frames (which of course, they are), but usually there are limits on physical objects intersecting each other. A mystery in an enigma.

P.S. I still have an HP audio meter that uses vacuum tubes and batteries (no hum). Now that I think of it, I'd better check it for battery auto destruction.

Hopefully no leakage!

That's an interesting design and I don't recall ever seeing one. We used to power the filaments with DC to prevent that filament-cathode kind of "bleedover" hum. Lots of old linear supply tricks using "Pi" filters with inductors between caps and so forth to get rid of ripple. Man some of that crap was big, lol. We're so spoiled these days and nostalgia aside I'm okay with that..

I still keep an old tube manual around in case I need to work on some vintage gear -- it's well worn and pretty much the binding is mostly tape now. What have I had it for? Over 40 years, wow. I'm old, lol.

Anyway nice chatting with you about "the old stuff".

I did mess around with the "game" a little and observed some of that stuff, but I searched in vain for any significant "Easter Eggs" or what not. Mostly it seems to be an exercise in destruction.

I guess that's about as much off-topic as I should go here -- probably too much already!
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post #24870 of 40650 (permalink) Old 07-29-2017, 09:25 PM
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It seems that during the past eight hours several AV scanners started reporting RTC version 1.01 as a malware. It is expected that a software like this is flagged as a malware by some of the lesser AV scanners, but in this case also Kaspersky (which I use personally) has started to block it within the last couple hours. The original release was compressed using the most recent UPX version, which most likely is the issue. This version is otherwise obviously identical, but lacks the UPX compression. No issues with Kaspersky with this version, at least for the time being.

Unless you use AV on your systems, there is no need to re-download the file as obviously neither of them contain any actual malware in the first place.

Ryzen Timing Checker 1.01

PW: "RyzenDRAM"
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