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post #1 of 80 (permalink) Old 10-19-2008, 03:03 PM - Thread Starter
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OK, so you finally installed Linux ... but now what? Sure you can find your way around, but maybe you need to know what software does what since everything's all different.

This is a quick guide for some of the apps and utilities you'll want to install to get the most out of your new Linux installation. We'll cover the two most popular Linux distributions, Ubuntu 10.04 through 11.10 and Fedora 15 and 16, and if you have something that's based on one of those, then it'll be very similar for you so you can still follow along. (Of note: Linux Mint is getting increasingly popular. Most all of the instructions for Ubuntu also apply to Linux Mint.)

Throughout this post there will be links where you can get more detailed information on a given topic. Click the links if you have questions.

I assume you've already found Firefox and know what it is. I also will skim over or won't cover software that's preinstalled on your Linux computer. I expect you to browse through your menus and click on all the apps and see what they do. You may be pleasantly surprised! I'll only point out preinstalled programs when it's not blatantly obvious what they're for.

Root (Administrator) Access Required

In a few places we'll have to run commands, so open a terminal and then get a root shell on the terminal. The remainder of this guide will assume you have a root shell available, as all commands given require root access and you may wish to run several of them.

Ubuntu

Click Applications > Accessories > Terminal.
 

Code:
sudo -s

Fedora

Click Applications > System Tools > Terminal.



Code:
su -

This allows you to run a series of commands as root without having to put "sudo" in front of each of them. Wherever a command appears below it's assumed you're already root, or the command won't work. When you're done with the root shell, type "exit" in the terminal.

How to Add Software

You can install software on your Linux system using a nice graphical interface or the command line, depending on which you find more comfortable, efficient, or whatever.

Most packages are available through the system's package manager, though you may sometimes download a package directly from the software vendor's web site. On Ubuntu, a .deb is an installable software package. The same for .rpm on Fedora. (These are roughly equivalent to .msi files in Windows.) To install a manually downloaded .deb or .rpm file, just double click on it.

GUI

Use your system's package manager to add software. You can enter a package name (like those given below) into the package manager's search box to find and install it. You can also search package descriptions; in the case you are looking for some piece of software but don't know its exact name you can enter a word or two describing what the software does (like "browser" or "IRC").

Ubuntu

Click System > Administration > Synaptic Package Manager.

Fedora

Click System > Administration > Add/Remove Software.

Command Line

To install software on the command line, which you might sometimes find easier than the GUI, you can use the command line.

Ubuntu
 

Code:
apt-get install <packagename(s)>

Sometimes apt-get will fail to configure a package. You can usually fix this by running apt-get -f install (without any package names) which will pick up where it left off.

Fedora
 

Code:
yum install <packagename(s)>

Getting More Software

You'll need to add some software repositories to get all the software available to you but that can't be shipped by default (e.g. due to licensing restrictions).

Ubuntu

Select all the repositories shown in System > Administration > Software Sources. (You don't need to select the installation CD.) Then click the Other Software tab and check Partner.

Install the medibuntu repository by running these commands (you should install this because several other packages below need it). Afterward, restart Firefox.



Code:
wget http://www.medibuntu.org/sources.list.d/$(lsb_release -cs).list -O /etc/apt/sources.list.d/medibuntu.list
apt-get update && apt-get --force-yes --allow-unauthenticated install medibuntu-keyring apturl app-install-data-medibuntu apport-hooks-medibuntu

Fedora

Download and install the RPM Fusion free and nonfree repository RPM packages.

Updates

Whenever there are software updates available, you'll be notified by a taskbar icon. Be sure to install all updates to ensure your system security, fix problems, etc.

Archives

Your Linux box comes with support for many popular archive formats already, though RAR and 7-zip aren't installed by default. These packages will let the Archive Manager GUI use .rar and .7z files, as well as allow you to manage them from the command line.

Ubuntu

Install the rar, unrar, p7zip, p7zip-full and p7zip-rar packages.

Fedora

Install the unrar, p7zip and p7zip-plugins packages. (Note that rar is not presently available on Fedora; if you need to create .rar files instead of just unpacking them, you can download rar from its official web site.)

Adobe

Let's get you set up to get Adobe Reader and Flash Player all at one pop.

Install Adobe Repository

Ubuntu

Adobe software is provided to Ubuntu through its Partner repository, which you should already have enabled (see Getting More Software above). If you haven't enabled Partner, do it now.

Fedora

Go to the Adobe Flash download site. Select "YUM for Linux". Open the file it downloads and install it. Now you have the Adobe Linux repositories installed and you can get updates for Flash Player and Adobe Reader automatically.

Flash Player

Ubuntu

Install the flashplugin-nonfree package. Restart Firefox and Flash Player should be ready for use.

64-bit Ubuntu note: The 64-bit version of Flash Player is not yet stable enough for general use; notably it has audio sync problems. 32-bit Flash Player is automatically configured for use on 64-bit systems.

Fedora

Install the flash-plugin package.

64-bit Fedora note: The 64-bit version of Flash Player is not yet stable enough for general use; notably it has audio sync problems.

To configure 32-bit Flash to run on 64-bit Fedora:

Install the alsa-plugins-pulseaudio.i686, nspluginwrapper.x86_64 and nspluginwrapper.i686 packages.

Now run:



Code:
mozilla-plugin-config -i -g -v

Restart Firefox and Flash Player should be ready for use. If you have trouble with Flash Player, the Fedora Wiki has an extensive guide you should check first.

Adobe Reader

Ubuntu

Install the acroread package.

Fedora

Install the AdobeReader_enu package.

Drivers

Linux will recognize most of your hardware out of the box, and will even cope with most hardware changes without complaint, though some wireless cards are extremely problematic (and outside the scope of this document) and ATi and NVIDIA cards need to have their drivers installed.

For wireless cards, Intel chipsets have the best support, followed by Atheros chipsets (though on Fedora you need to install the madwifi package and reboot). Broadcom chipsets are now fairly well supported, too. Anything else is a crapshoot or is going to require something almost as painful as a root canal. For now. Driver support is always improving and by the time you read this, your wireless card might just work. Google your wireless card model followed by linux and you should be able to find a clue as to the chipset it uses.

Ubuntu

Go to System > Administration > Hardware Drivers and select the video driver you want to install. If you have problems with this method, try using the envy script to install your video drivers. Restart your computer after installing the drivers.

Fedora

NVIDIA: Install the akmod-nvidia package (for NVIDIA). Then run "yum update" to pick up any necessary updates, then restart your computer. You will receive driver updates automatically, though they may be a week or two behind the manufacturers' release dates.

ATI: Install the akmod-catalyst package (for AMD/ATI). Then run "yum update" to pick up any necessary updates, then restart your computer. You will receive driver updates automatically, though they may be a week or two behind the manufacturers' release dates.

DVD, Movies, MP3

Restricted Formats Support

All of these involve restricted formats which can't be legally distributed with the OS as shipped to you, and the instructions for getting them working would make this article much longer than it should be.

Ubuntu

Follow this guide.

Fedora

Install these packages: libdvdcss libdvdnav ffmpeg gstreamer-plugins-bad gstreamer-plugins-bad-extras gstreamer-plugins-ugly

MP3 Players

To play your extensive MP3 and Ogg collection, or buy music online, try Rhythmbox. Rhythmbox also supports podcasts. Install the rhythmbox package if it is not already installed.

If you want a more minimal MP3 player (resembling Winamp Classic) try Audacious.

Ubuntu

Install the audacious and audacious-plugins packages.

Fedora

Install the audacious, audacious-plugins and audacious-plugins-freeworld packages.

Video Players

Totem is installed by default and will play back most DVDs and video files downloaded from the Internet. If you're missing a codec, you'll be prompted to install it when you try to play a file that uses the missing codec.

Some other video players you may try are MPlayer and VLC. At the moment, only MPlayer has Blu-Ray support.

Ubuntu

Install the gnome-mplayer and/or vlc package.

Fedora

Install the gmplayer and/or vlc package.

IM, Chat, Skype

Instant Messaging

For instant messaging using AIM, Yahoo, MSN and Google Talk (Jabber) protocols use the pidgin package, which should already be installed. For encrypted IMs using the Off The Record protocol, install the pidgin-otr package, restart pidgin, and enable the plugin in your preferences.

Fedora now defaults to using the Empathy (empathy package) for IM. Empathy is also available on Ubuntu. Among other things it supports video chat. But it doesn't have support for encrypted IMs. If you need this, you'll have to install pidgin and pidgin-otr as above.

IRC

For IRC, try X-Chat (install the xchat package).

Skype

Ubuntu

Install the skype package.

Fedora

Download and install Skype from its web site.

Webcam

To use your webcam, install the cheese package. For older webcams, you may also need to install webcam drivers (which unfortunately is beyond the scope, blah blah) though most newer webcams are set up automatically.

CD/DVD Burning

Linux will burn audio and data CDs and data DVDs out of the box. CD/DVD images should be in ISO format with the .iso extension. Then right-click and choose Write to Disc. The nrg2iso utility will convert Nero .nrg images to standard .iso format. To convert many other ISO types, try AcetoneISO.

Ubuntu

Install the nrg2iso and/or acetoneiso packages.

Fedora

Install the nrg2iso and/or AcetoneISO2 packages (this package name is case-sensitive).

Audio CD Ripping

To rip audio CDs, try the Grip program (install the grip package). It can download CD track data and tag your files for you automatically and uses Xiph CDDA Paranoia as its ripping backend, which means you can get your audio off of even heavily scratched CDs with little or no loss in perceived audio quality.

ISO Editing/Mastering

If you want to edit CD/DVD ISO images, e.g. to add files, try the ISO Master program (install the isomaster package). You can also double-click the ISO image to browse its contents and extract files. See also AcetoneISO (above).

Audio and Video Editing

There are several video editors available for Linux, ranging from simple to immensely complicated. Try the Kino or Pitivi video editors (install the kino or pitivi packages) for fairly simple video editing and conversion. For professional grade stuff, you'll have to hunt down cinelerra.

To create Video DVDs or VCDs, try the DeVeDe program (install the devede package).

For audio editing, the Audacity and Ardour programs should meet most of your needs.

Ubuntu

Install the audacity and/or ardour packages.

Fedora

Install the audacity-freeworld and/or ardour packages.

Photos and Graphics

Linux will recognize and import photos from most digital cameras and SD/MMC/memory cards automatically. The software you need should already be installed. If not, install the shotwell package.

For standard raster graphics, The GIMP is king (the gimp package should already be installed). While not quite as powerful as Photoshop it should meet most people's needs.

For vector graphics install Inkscape (install the inkscape package).

And for 3D modeling/raytracing, there's nothing like Blender (install the blender package).

Peer to Peer (P2P)

BitTorrent

The Transmission BitTorrent client should already be installed (if not, install the transmission package). It may feel kind of stripped down compared to other clients like Azureus Vuze but it gets the job done. Speaking of which, you can install that too: just install the azureus package. Another great BitTorrent client is Deluge (on Ubuntu, install deluge-torrent; on Fedora, install deluge). It has all the features you expect but is much lighter than Azureus.

Gnutella (LimeWire)

Install the gtk-gnutella package.

If you want a more LimeWire-like experience, try Frostwire, available from the Frostwire website.

eDonkey/eMule

aMule is a multi-platform ed2k client which you may already be familiar with.

Ubuntu

Install the amule and amule-utils-gui packages.

Fedora

Install the amule package.

Remote Desktop

Serving Your Desktop

To allow access to your desktop (via VNC) from remote computers, go to System > Preferences > Internet & Network > Remote Desktop.

Connecting to Other Desktops

To connect to other computers with VNC, install a VNC viewer such as vinagre (the GNOME VNC client) or vncviewer (the original VNC client, aka RealVNC). One or both of these may already be installed.

To connect to MS Windows computers using RDP, install the rdesktop package.

And to have a nice GUI which integrates all your VNC and Windows remote desktops, install Terminal Server Client (tsclient).

Other Internet Apps

Obviously you should get Thunderbird for your e-mail but it may not be installed by default (install the thunderbird package). You can also try Evolution (preinstalled) or Seamonkey (install seamonkey).

For RSS, I love Liferea (install liferea).

For FTP/SFTP, try FileZilla (install filezilla).

Windows Files and Programs

Wine. You've all heard of it. In case you haven't, it lets you run many Windows programs sort of natively on your Linux computer. Install the wine package to get it. Once installed, you can just double click an .exe or .msi file to install a Windows program, and you'll find a new Wine menu under Applications for all the Windows programs you have installed.

To read your Windows hard drive partitions under Linux, you need to have the ntfs-3g package installed (if your drives don't show up after installing it, restart your computer). Note that reading and writing to NTFS partitions can be quite slow sometimes.

Overclocking

First you need some software to read your motherboard sensors. On Linux, it's called lm_sensors.

Ubuntu

Install the lm-sensors package.

Fedora

The lm_sensors package should already be installed; if not, install it now.

Set Up Sensors

Run "yes | sensors-detect" from the command line to detect your motherboard's sensors. (You only have to do this once per motherboard; you only have to do it again if you replace your motherboard.)

NOTE: lm_sensors does not work with server motherboards or the Skulltrail. You'll know you have such a board if sensors-detect complains about "bmcsensors" being missing. On these boards you will need to install the OpenIPMI and OpenIPMI-tools packages, and use the "ipmitool sdr elist" command to view motherboard sensors; there is no GUI for this type of motherboard sensor since it's rarely found in consumer motherboards.

Once sensors-detect finishes then you can run "sensors" from the command line to view all the sensors, or add the Hardware Sensors applet to your panel (taskbar). Right-click a blank spot on the panel, click Add to Panel... and select Hardware Sensors Applet.

You will likely see some sensors which don't actually exist on your motherboard. This is normal because motherboard manufacturers make several different boards on the same design and some sensors may be present on the high end boards that aren't present on the low end boards. But the hardware still is capable of addressing the absent sensors. You can hide them in the Hardware Sensors applet by right-clicking and choosing Preferences.

If you can't find the applet, you'll need to install it:

Ubuntu

Install the sensors-applet package.

Fedora

Install the gnome-applet-sensors package.

Prime95

Linux 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Prime95 are available from the GIMPS download page. The Windows version of Prime95 also runs in Linux using Wine.

Memtest+

Memtest was preinstalled with your Ubuntu or Fedora system. On Fedora, you need to run the "memtest-setup" command to add it to your boot menu. To run memtest, reboot and select it from the boot menu.

NVIDIA Overclocking

To overclock your NVIDIA GPU, you need to enable Coolbits. Edit your /etc/X11/xorg.conf file by running the command "gedit /etc/X11/xorg.conf". Find the line which says Driver "nvidia" and add a new line below it which reads Option "Coolbits" "1" After you log out and log back in, the NVIDIA control panel will allow you to change your clock frequencies and fan speed.

NOTE: As of this writing (290.10) the NVIDIA driver does not display the overclocking menu or permit command-line overclocking for 4xx and 5xx series cards. If this happens to you, please run nvidia-bug-report.sh as root. It will generate a file called nvidia-bug-report.log.gz. Email this log and a description of the problem to [email protected]. In the meantime about the only thing you can do is to use DOS- or Windows-based utilities to flash the BIOS with your preferred clocks and voltages.

For very old NVIDIA cards which do not support CoolBits, run the "nvclock" command or select the NVCLOCK GUI from the menus.

Ubuntu

Install the nvclock and nvclock-gtk packages.

Fedora

Install the nvclock and nvclock-gui packages.

AMD Overclocking

On AMD/ATI cards that support OverDrive, you can enable OverDrive with the "aticonfig --od-enable" command. The Catalyst Control Center GUI will support OverDrive in a future release, according to AMD. For older ATi cards, you'll need the rovclock command line utility.

If you want a more Afterburner-like experience, try AMDOverdriveCtrl.

Ubuntu

Download and install the 32-bit ot 64-bit .deb file from the AMDOverdriveCtrl web site.

Fedora

AMDOverdriveCtrl has not been packaged for Fedora so it must be compiled manually. (Instructions coming as soon as my ATI card shows up; check back tomorrow.)

Benching

To benchmark your system, try the Phoronix Test Suite.

Conclusion

This is just a small sampling of the Linux software you now have access to. But it'll cover a wide variety of situations and make your life in Linux just a little easier. If I forgot your favorite piece of software then feel free to mention it in the little box below.

If you still have questions about doing something in Linux, the first thing you want to check are the FAQ's for your given distribution.

Ubuntu

Bookmark the Ubuntu Guide.

Mint

Bookmark the Mint Wiki.

Fedora

Bookmark the Fedora FAQ and Fedora Wiki.

Enjoy Linux!


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I did error10's Windows Challenge and I now am an MCSE: Minesweeper Consultant and Solitaire Expert! graduated.gif
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post #2 of 80 (permalink) Old 10-19-2008, 03:41 PM
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nice job +rep!

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post #3 of 80 (permalink) Old 10-19-2008, 04:15 PM - Thread Starter
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Added an Overclocking section to the OP.

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post #4 of 80 (permalink) Old 10-19-2008, 04:56 PM
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+rep.

very useful to the newer Linux users out there, i'm sure

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post #5 of 80 (permalink) Old 10-19-2008, 05:53 PM
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rep+! Fantastic guide. Good to get those Linux legs movin'!

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post #6 of 80 (permalink) Old 10-19-2008, 06:36 PM
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A few things:

- For wlan devices, you forgot Ralink chips. The driver for them works really well, but Ubuntu tends to have better support for them since the package maintainers tend to patch drivers a lot (therefore they tend to be more current and compatible). Very easy to obtain chips as well, compared to Atheros based cards. Broadcom should also be considered since the chips are fairly easy to get working now (requieres a bit of work, but they do work and no need to mess around with ndiswrapper). Another chip that does work "out of the box" is the Zydas chip, usually found on USB devices.

- The latest fglrx driver supports Overdrive for r6xx and r7xx cards. Rovclock only supports a few old cards (r3xx and older I think). If you have a r6xx or newer card you're only choice is to install the latest drivers, which is not that hard.

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post #7 of 80 (permalink) Old 10-19-2008, 09:28 PM - Thread Starter
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I didn't forget Ralink chips. I just haven't heard from anyone who has one that didn't have a complete nightmare trying to get them to work. The same is true of Broadcom chips. Ralink, at least, has a driver that's shaping up quite nicely, even if it takes some work to install. The Broadcom driver still needs a lot of work and is quite the pain to get working.

As for overclocking ATi cards, you'll need to explain that a little better. How does one overclock their card? That was not at all clear from what you wrote. Edit: I just Googled it and updated the OP.

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post #8 of 80 (permalink) Old 10-19-2008, 10:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by error10 View Post
I didn't forget Ralink chips. I just haven't heard from anyone who has one that didn't have a complete nightmare trying to get them to work. The same is true of Broadcom chips. Ralink, at least, has a driver that's shaping up quite nicely, even if it takes some work to install. The Broadcom driver still needs a lot of work and is quite the pain to get working.

As for overclocking ATi cards, you'll need to explain that a little better. How does one overclock their card? That was not at all clear from what you wrote. Edit: I just Googled it and updated the OP.

Hardy already has patched Ralink drivers. They really do work out of the box (all my machines have Ralink cards in them, R61, RT2500, RT2400, RT2561). Broadcom chips are also configured automatically (it still requires a firmware hack that you must accept to do). OpenSuse 10.3 is pretty much in the same boat.

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post #9 of 80 (permalink) Old 10-19-2008, 11:27 PM - Thread Starter
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Oh, and I don't know about the Ralink serialmonkey driver, but the Broadcom driver apparently has no support (yet) for draft-n cards.

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post #10 of 80 (permalink) Old 10-19-2008, 11:53 PM
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Great guide, though for BT Deluge is so much better than any other client its not even funny.

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