Source Version Control System - what do you use and why? I need to find a solution for my company - Overclock.net - An Overclocking Community

Forum Jump: 

Source Version Control System - what do you use and why? I need to find a solution for my company

Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 26 (permalink) Old 12-08-2016, 02:49 PM - Thread Starter
Blessed to Serve
 
Bigceeloc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Michigan
Posts: 819
Rep: 15 (Unique: 9)
Hi all,
I have been tasked with researching some code control systems and software. We are open to cloudhosted options like github and the like.

I could use some help and opinions please! What do you use and how did you implement it and why?

The beginning of wisdom is this: Get wisdom. Though it cost all you have, get understanding. - Proverbs 4:7
Bigceeloc is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 26 (permalink) Old 12-08-2016, 09:42 PM
New to Overclock.net
 
Avonosac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: PA
Posts: 2,957
Rep: 158 (Unique: 114)
Git. Only use some form of git.


Avonosac is offline  
post #3 of 26 (permalink) Old 12-09-2016, 05:31 AM - Thread Starter
Blessed to Serve
 
Bigceeloc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Michigan
Posts: 819
Rep: 15 (Unique: 9)
Reasons for it? Like gitlab or githug?

The beginning of wisdom is this: Get wisdom. Though it cost all you have, get understanding. - Proverbs 4:7
Bigceeloc is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 26 (permalink) Old 12-09-2016, 05:58 AM
New to Overclock.net
 
Tk7331's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 317
Rep: 18 (Unique: 18)
We use BitBucket and Jira at my company. Works really well and is pretty easy to setup and start using. Not very expensive for small company's either which is good. You can do a trial and go through their documentation to see if it would work for you.
Tk7331 is offline  
post #5 of 26 (permalink) Old 12-09-2016, 06:30 AM
New to Overclock.net
 
Avonosac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: PA
Posts: 2,957
Rep: 158 (Unique: 114)
Gitlab I've played with, I've heard nothing about githug. But the primary concern is to use git because it's distributed and free, and there are crazy good suites of products which integrate directly into it. The VCS is incredibly powerful, and FAST, and the model is so different from any other VCS, when you embrace the style your context switching, merging, CI/CD all become extremely streamlined.

The reasons to use git are stupendously long depending on the detail level you seek, and there are many many many resources out there that extensively document Git's advantages. The biggest advantage I see though, is going from a small group with a self managed repository, and then expanding to an enterprise offering from someone like Github is just a matter of setting up an additional remote, and a single push later your entire history is migrated.


Avonosac is offline  
post #6 of 26 (permalink) Old 12-09-2016, 12:20 PM
New to Overclock.net
 
Mrzev's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Texas
Posts: 2,258
Rep: 96 (Unique: 76)
If you use visual studio, go with TFS. Git is nice because there is a ton of flexability in there, but that is also why its a pain sometimes. I personally dont like Git because I always run into some issue with it somewhere. I also dont care for the idea checking into my local repo, and then pushing that to the global repo (or whatever its called). I personally like to have a single commit instead of a commit+push. BUT, git is the defacto standard... so if you are not using visual studio, use GIT.



Mrzev is offline  
post #7 of 26 (permalink) Old 12-11-2016, 12:35 PM
New to Overclock.net
 
takoma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 29
Rep: 0
I agree with the above that Git requires you to tame it a bit before you can really use it in a meaningful way. That being said, there is not that much to learn for a beginner besides some vocabulary and basic workflow. And it definitely is a standard.

I would add that if you can afford it, I would suggest to host your own git server instead on relying on Github or Bitbucket or the likes. It's not difficult to do and you have complete control of your repo that way. I think those are good as a backup or a way to share code with the outside world but for a development purpose I'm not convinced.

takoma is offline  
post #8 of 26 (permalink) Old 12-11-2016, 12:37 PM
New to Overclock.net
 
1337LutZ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Rotterdam, The Netherland
Posts: 5,937
Rep: 257 (Unique: 207)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tk7331 View Post

We use BitBucket and Jira at my company. Works really well and is pretty easy to setup and start using. Not very expensive for small company's either which is good. You can do a trial and go through their documentation to see if it would work for you.

 

Same, we use the complete Atlassian package. It also makes CI integration (Bamboo) easier.



gunner2.gif Automated TC Stats! sniper.gif  |   I'm the guy that fixes the TC stats


1337LutZ is offline  
post #9 of 26 (permalink) Old 12-11-2016, 12:52 PM
Software 'Engineer'
 
jakethesnake438's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Noo Zolond
Posts: 876
Rep: 53 (Unique: 48)
Bog standard git on GitHub, cheap(ish) and easy to use.
Depends really on your workflow....

Is this still broken?
Xeon machine
(13 items)
CPU
Xeon E5-2667V2
Motherboard
HP Z620 2012
GPU
Sapphire RX 580 4GB
RAM
32GB 1333MHZ
Hard Drive
2x 256GB SATA SSD
Operating System
Windows 10
Operating System
MacOS Mojave
Monitor
Dell P2418D 1440p
Monitor
Dell U2414H 1080p
Keyboard
Apple Kbd
Mouse
Steelseries QCK
Mouse
Logitech G602
Audio
Senheiser HD449
▲ hide details ▲
jakethesnake438 is offline  
post #10 of 26 (permalink) Old 12-12-2016, 07:17 AM
New to Overclock.net
 
Avonosac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: PA
Posts: 2,957
Rep: 158 (Unique: 114)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrzev View Post

If you use visual studio, go with TFS. Git is nice because there is a ton of flexability in there, but that is also why its a pain sometimes. I personally dont like Git because I always run into some issue with it somewhere. I also dont care for the idea checking into my local repo, and then pushing that to the global repo (or whatever its called). I personally like to have a single commit instead of a commit+push. BUT, git is the defacto standard... so if you are not using visual studio, use GIT.

This is the exact same issue everyone goes through with Git, because distributed and Git are such a fundamentally different approach to version control. The way I read your response is an argument against distributed, not necessarily an argument against Git. Functionally, TFS and git probably appear very similar on the surface if you were to disregard where the changes are being stored. It just seems to me that you are not comfortable with the concept of a distributed VCS, in the same way I was in the beginning.

The thing that finally got me on board to start adopting to the git way of thinking is that if you want it to, git will devolve back into a centralized VCS.
Quote:
Originally Posted by takoma View Post

I agree with the above that Git requires you to tame it a bit before you can really use it in a meaningful way. That being said, there is not that much to learn for a beginner besides some vocabulary and basic workflow. And it definitely is a standard.

I would add that if you can afford it, I would suggest to host your own git server instead on relying on Github or Bitbucket or the likes. It's not difficult to do and you have complete control of your repo that way. I think those are good as a backup or a way to share code with the outside world but for a development purpose I'm not convinced.

I read 'tame it' and just get the impression you are trying to fight against git. It is extremely opinionated even though it is distributed and flexible, you simply need to tailor the rest of your flow to work with git. But even that explanation is weak, because the truth is the real enhancement and benefits you get from git is the improvements to your workflows.


Avonosac is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Overclock.net - An Overclocking Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off