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post #1 of 17 (permalink) Old 10-12-2019, 08:33 AM - Thread Starter
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Im going to build custom heatsinks for my ram out of copper and i have a guestion that i hope someone could answer. Could i short circuit and kill the ram by connecting the cooper plate directly on top of the ram chips? Are the ram chips (black squares) electricly conducted/loaded? I dont think so but i want to make sure.

I do this mostly because its fun to build things but also in an attempt to reduce my ram temperatures while gaming (48C)
The ram is a 3200MHz cl14 kit (1.35v) OC to 3600MHz cl15 (1.395v).

Last edited by Tapper; 10-12-2019 at 10:02 AM.
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post #2 of 17 (permalink) Old 10-12-2019, 08:40 AM
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Hi,
Sweat will kill the chips hot surface on cooler surface will create condensation that's why thermal pads are needed 0.05mm i believe.

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post #3 of 17 (permalink) Old 10-12-2019, 08:42 AM
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make sure you are only cooling the chips themselves and nothing else...
use thermal pads.
did your memory come with heatsinks?

Use a fan to help cool if you can..

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post #4 of 17 (permalink) Old 10-12-2019, 09:15 AM
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i"ve used nickel plated copper and aluminum heatsinks on ram with just thermal paste on the ic. I also run 2v on ram with stock heatsinks, during long benching sessions. I don't think it's necessary for your use case, but if you're into making stuff, go for it. Typically there would be a thermal pad or something on the side with no ic and then you could use thermal pads or paste on the other side. Take that into account when calculating measurements.



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post #5 of 17 (permalink) Old 10-12-2019, 09:18 AM
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what 3200 CL14 kit comes with no heatsink?

regardless 48c isn't high, leave them alone. they're fine.

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post #6 of 17 (permalink) Old 10-12-2019, 09:53 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote: Originally Posted by Mikecdm View Post
i"ve used nickel plated copper and aluminum heatsinks on ram with just thermal paste on the ic. I also run 2v on ram with stock heatsinks, during long benching sessions. I don't think it's necessary for your use case, but if you're into making stuff, go for it. Typically there would be a thermal pad or something on the side with no ic and then you could use thermal pads or paste on the other side. Take that into account when calculating measurements.
That sound promising, so as long as the copper plate dont touch anything else then the black chips im ok with just having thermal paste? And there is no electricity in the chips making a short circuit possible?
I have build an entire pc case in a shape of a pyramid out of a raw sheet of aluminum, so yeah i like to build things 🙂.

Last edited by Tapper; 10-12-2019 at 10:02 AM.
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post #7 of 17 (permalink) Old 10-12-2019, 09:57 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote: Originally Posted by The Pook View Post
what 3200 CL14 kit comes with no heatsink?

regardless 48c isn't high, leave them alone. they're fine.
My games tends to crash when i reach 46-48C. Memtest does not heat up the ram to anywhere close to that so i get no errors when testing the ram. Gaming heats up the ram way higher because both cpu and gpu heats up the case. I got plenty of Noctua fans so i dont see how i can improve the airflow any more.

About ram temperatures:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.red...ted_stability/
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post #8 of 17 (permalink) Old 10-12-2019, 12:35 PM
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Quote: Originally Posted by Tapper View Post
My games tends to crash when i reach 46-48C. Memtest does not heat up the ram to anywhere close to that so i get no errors when testing the ram. Gaming heats up the ram way higher because both cpu and gpu heats up the case. I got plenty of Noctua fans so i dont see how i can improve the airflow any more.

About ram temperatures:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.red...ted_stability/
Assuming your memory is still this one (F4-3200C14D-16GFX) that you noted in another thread, the sticks should have some aluminum heatsinks that are more than adequate for the loads you are giving it with appropriate airflow. Trying to dismantle the heatsink may not be easy to do as an Amazon user review noted there was tough to remove thermal tape on the backside of the PCB.

If you do successfully remove the memory heatsinks without ripping off any of the memory chips, you should see something like this (minus the sticker):
Spoiler!

Those big black rectangles are DDR4 memory ICs that have a non-electrically conductive epoxy coating forming a package around the DDR4 silicon to protect it and have little solder balls underneath the IC connecting to the memory PCB for the electricity to pass through. Having bare metal touching this epoxy will not hurt the memory even if it is turned on (although heat transfer will be relatively bad without a thermal paste/pad), but anything electrically conductive touching the solder balls or the solder of any other component on the board will probably end up causing a short circuit. This is unlikely to impact you because the memory chips are usually the tallest thing on a memory PCB and the heatsinks usually have thermal tape or thermal pads preventing the heatsink from flexing and touching any PCB components; but short of using liquid metal for your custom heatsinks thermal interface, the risk for electrical shorts is pretty low.

The main advantage to using thermal paste over pads is the paste can be spread thinner under pressure and increase the effective heat transfer into your heatsink. Thermal pads/tape are a lot less messy though and are far more forgiving of mistakes during the mounting step due to their solid nature that limits their movement. You will also have to find a way to connect the two heatsink pieces together while maintaining even pressure across the memory chips to ensure your thermal interface doesn't have air gaps (much easier to do with thermal pads/tape than paste).

As for your memory temperatures, having a picture of your case and CPU/GPU arrangement would be useful because memory heatsinks tend to be overshadowed by the CPU heatsink and don't recieve a lot of direct airflow. Putting a thermometer probe in the space between your two memory sticks and comparing the reading to the air temperature in front of your CPU cooler (presumably behind an intake fan) can do a lot to tell you how much airflow your memory is actually getting. You can also test the temperature of the air inside and outside your case to determine if your case isn't being ventilated properly and then play around with your fan orientations.

Hope this helps! If you do decide to make custom copper heatsinks for your memory, please consider posting your build log here as I am sure people would love to see your design and results!

Sincerely: shellashock
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post #9 of 17 (permalink) Old 10-12-2019, 01:39 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote: Originally Posted by shellashock View Post
Quote: Originally Posted by Tapper View Post
My games tends to crash when i reach 46-48C. Memtest does not heat up the ram to anywhere close to that so i get no errors when testing the ram. Gaming heats up the ram way higher because both cpu and gpu heats up the case. I got plenty of Noctua fans so i dont see how i can improve the airflow any more.

About ram temperatures:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.red...ted_stability/
Assuming your memory is still this one (F4-3200C14D-16GFX) that you noted in another thread, the sticks should have some aluminum heatsinks that are more than adequate for the loads you are giving it with appropriate airflow. Trying to dismantle the heatsink may not be easy to do as an Amazon user review noted there was tough to remove thermal tape on the backside of the PCB.

If you do successfully remove the memory heatsinks without ripping off any of the memory chips, you should see something like this (minus the sticker):
Spoiler!

Those big black rectangles are DDR4 memory ICs that have a non-electrically conductive epoxy coating forming a package around the DDR4 silicon to protect it and have little solder balls underneath the IC connecting to the memory PCB for the electricity to pass through. Having bare metal touching this epoxy will not hurt the memory even if it is turned on (although heat transfer will be relatively bad without a thermal paste/pad), but anything electrically conductive touching the solder balls or the solder of any other component on the board will probably end up causing a short circuit. This is unlikely to impact you because the memory chips are usually the tallest thing on a memory PCB and the heatsinks usually have thermal tape or thermal pads preventing the heatsink from flexing and touching any PCB components; but short of using liquid metal for your custom heatsinks thermal interface, the risk for electrical shorts is pretty low.

The main advantage to using thermal paste over pads is the paste can be spread thinner under pressure and increase the effective heat transfer into your heatsink. Thermal pads/tape are a lot less messy though and are far more forgiving of mistakes during the mounting step due to their solid nature that limits their movement. You will also have to find a way to connect the two heatsink pieces together while maintaining even pressure across the memory chips to ensure your thermal interface doesn't have air gaps (much easier to do with thermal pads/tape than paste).

As for your memory temperatures, having a picture of your case and CPU/GPU arrangement would be useful because memory heatsinks tend to be overshadowed by the CPU heatsink and don't recieve a lot of direct airflow. Putting a thermometer probe in the space between your two memory sticks and comparing the reading to the air temperature in front of your CPU cooler (presumably behind an intake fan) can do a lot to tell you how much airflow your memory is actually getting. You can also test the temperature of the air inside and outside your case to determine if your case isn't being ventilated properly and then play around with your fan orientations.

Hope this helps! If you do decide to make custom copper heatsinks for your memory, please consider posting your build log here as I am sure people would love to see your design and results!

Sincerely: shellashock
Thank you for that elaboratet answer. I am going to use thermal paste on the IC (kryonat). And i have already removed the heatsinks, it was quite difficult and took me about 2 hours 😁. I already took some measurements and like you said the ic is the tallest thing on the ram.
I have 2 140mm Noctua as intake and 2 Noctua as exhaust, one in the bak and one on the bak top of the case, the cpu is not over my ramsticks ( Noctua u12 in a push pull config), it's about 2 cm away from the first stick.
Now i feel confident in doing this build and you answered all the questions i had.

Thank you again and i will tune back with the results.

Last edited by Tapper; 10-12-2019 at 04:21 PM.
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post #10 of 17 (permalink) Old 10-12-2019, 09:06 PM
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Quote: Originally Posted by Tapper View Post
Thank you for that elaboratet answer. I am going to use thermal paste on the IC (kryonat). And i have already removed the heatsinks, it was quite difficult and took me about 2 hours 😁. I already took some measurements and like you said the ic is the tallest thing on the ram.
I have 2 140mm Noctua as intake and 2 Noctua as exhaust, one in the bak and one on the bak top of the case, the cpu is not over my ramsticks ( Noctua u12 in a push pull config), it's about 2 cm away from the first stick.
Now i feel confident in doing this build and you answered all the questions i had.

Thank you again and i will tune back with the results.
Fair enough and I wish you good luck. I do recommend that you try propping a fan directly over top of your memory sticks as the close proximity to the CPU cooler fan can lead to the CPU cooler sucking up all the fresh air coming from the case intake fans and not enough air getting blown directly on the memory stick heatsinks; but it sounds like you have no plans of using the memory sticks until you make new copper heatsinks.

For the record, DDR4 memory does not pull much power and can easily be run with no heatsinks if you aren't using stressful freq/timing combinations or have a fan propped over them to give forced airflow. This means you can test the memory before you finish your heatsinks to make sure everything is working A-OK and you didn't damage anything during the heatsink removal process.
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