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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-07-2011, 12:41 PM - Thread Starter
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I decided to start my build log for my Antec 1200 case mod. Im gonna be doing a portal theme with this so there is going to be a lot of case painting so its going to take awhile. Ill update everytime i get something done, and today the first lay of primer painting and sanding.

Here's the before picture:

IMAG0018.jpg

im starting on the flat side. After sanding and cleaning (i didnt take pictures of the prep work frown.gif ) i put the first layer of primer down. Its what primer, as the only other color im going to be using is white gloss.

Here is it currently, just painted. I know there are 'waves' in the paint. The stupid tip of the can broke and sprayed randomly. Ill be sanding those parts down and putting atleast 2-3 more layers of primer.

IMAG0035.jpg

more to come as i figure out the design and stencil stuff im kicking around. Hopefully it comes out awesome smile.gif

Stay tuned

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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-07-2011, 12:59 PM
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Are you going to re-LED the 200mm fan?

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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-07-2011, 01:18 PM - Thread Starter
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yes that will be after the painting. Im planning on trying to make the front fans look sort of like portals. Also im gonna try and redo the inside with some LED's as well. I was thinking liquid cooling, but thats gonna take awhile....as i havent been keeping up with water cooling as of late and i would have to research it more

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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-07-2011, 05:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ilhe4e12345;14855765 
Ill be sanding those parts down and putting atleast 2-3 more layers of primer.

Not sure why people put so much paint on stuff...?

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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-07-2011, 06:38 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Furball Zen;14858895 
Not sure why people put so much paint on stuff...?

only reason im putting another layer of primer on is to seal it well so it will have a good even layer that's all. That and i waved the paint a little on the first layer so i have to sand and repaint at least once :/

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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-07-2011, 09:18 PM
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Its painted metal right? Whats to seal? Just curious where your mind is going.

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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-08-2011, 10:21 AM - Thread Starter
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yes it is metal, but i have had issues in the past where the paint didnt stick well with the primer was all. I just want to be safe with it is all, as this is my first real case mod that i want to do the right way. Nothing wrong with being a little extra right? 2 layers of primer, 2 of high gloss white and she will look amazing smile.gif

That and like i said before i messed up the first layer by putting the waves in it so i want to correct that ASAP.

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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-08-2011, 12:14 PM
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Adding many layers of paint or primer is perfectly fine, as long as you properly prepare the original surface, use light coats and follow recommended drying times/conditions for the material, and properly prepare fresh surfaces between coats as necessary for appearance or proper adhesion (as specified by the manufacturer of your product).

There is nothing wrong with doing a few coats of primer, sanding each smooth between coats and removing the sanding dust/oils with alcohol. This if preferable if you going for a smooth look and high gloss or buffed finish. Your paint will only be as flat and smooth as whatever is under it.

My process for painting anything "perfectly" is/would be as follows:
Fill all dents, dings, voids, etc as necessary and sand smooth using a reasonably hard block. You may need multiple coats as your filler dries and you sand it. Sand the whole case well with 220-320 paper using a block wherever possible. Wipe case down well with naptha or alcohol on a rag.

Prime the case, spray edges of a part then spray the whole part immediately. Sand primer smooth with 320-600 grit paper. Repeat process until the parts are completely primered after sanding (no burned through edges) and the primer has filled any pin-hole blemishes, pits, etc. If you have an area that needs thicker primer, such as deeper scratches, pitting, etc, feel free to spray several coats on that area without sanding, but, make sure the primer is dry between coats. Thicker takes much longer to dry. If you rush it, it will not sand well adn will take longer to dry than if you simply waited longer between coats. Again, repeat this and earlier priming+sanding steps as necessary.

Wipe down case with alcohol on a soft rag (unless you used a water-based product then follow manufactures diferctions). Regardless of any companies directions, do not ever use a tack cloth, any commercial tack cloth, to remove dust. They often casue more harm than good.

You final primer sanding should use 400-600 grit paper and be doen with a block everywhere possible. No matter how careful you are, you fingers will leave different pressure and sanded areas and will eventually lead to subtle striping in the paint layers.

Paint with several coats, following manufactures directions for environmental conditions and time between coats. Usually, you can do 2-3 light coats of paint without sanding in between if you observe the correct timing. This is because paint will marginally dissolve the layer below if it is not too cured, thus forming a chemically structured thicker layer.

Depending on the appearance, dust in the environemnt, your skills with a spray gun or can, the brand of paint used, spitting from dirty nozzels, intention to polish and buff, etc, you may be happy or you may need to sand with 600-1000 grit, preferably wet sanding it, always using a hard rubber block, and then spray again.

With paint, as with primer, remember to spray the edges well then immediately spray the part.

Remember, you most recently applied coat of paint will only look as good as all previous coats/surface quality below. You can never spray paint to cover a run, sag, dent, or any other blemish. All you can do is apply enough paint to that area to allow you to sand it out without burning through, without applying so much paint that it dries improperly and produces a weaker, more chip or blush prone final product.

Its not that hard though, you just have to be patient and realize the preparation is critical for a truly excellent finish.
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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-08-2011, 12:25 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ddietz;14868013 
Adding many layers of paint or primer is perfectly fine, as long as you properly prepare the original surface, use light coats and follow recommended drying times/conditions for the material, and properly prepare fresh surfaces between coats as necessary for appearance or proper adhesion (as specified by the manufacturer of your product).

There is nothing wrong with doing a few coats of primer, sanding each smooth between coats and removing the sanding dust/oils with alcohol. This if preferable if you going for a smooth look and high gloss or buffed finish. Your paint will only be as flat and smooth as whatever is under it.

My process for painting anything "perfectly" is/would be as follows:
Fill all dents, dings, voids, etc as necessary and sand smooth using a reasonably hard block. You may need multiple coats as your filler dries and you sand it. Sand the whole case well with 220-320 paper using a block wherever possible. Wipe case down well with naptha or alcohol on a rag.

Prime the case, spray edges of a part then spray the whole part immediately. Sand primer smooth with 320-600 grit paper. Repeat process until the parts are completely primered after sanding (no burned through edges) and the primer has filled any pin-hole blemishes, pits, etc. If you have an area that needs thicker primer, such as deeper scratches, pitting, etc, feel free to spray several coats on that area without sanding, but, make sure the primer is dry between coats. Thicker takes much longer to dry. If you rush it, it will not sand well adn will take longer to dry than if you simply waited longer between coats. Again, repeat this and earlier priming+sanding steps as necessary.

Wipe down case with alcohol on a soft rag (unless you used a water-based product then follow manufactures diferctions). Regardless of any companies directions, do not ever use a tack cloth, any commercial tack cloth, to remove dust. They often casue more harm than good.

You final primer sanding should use 400-600 grit paper and be doen with a block everywhere possible. No matter how careful you are, you fingers will leave different pressure and sanded areas and will eventually lead to subtle striping in the paint layers.

Paint with several coats, following manufactures directions for environmental conditions and time between coats. Usually, you can do 2-3 light coats of paint without sanding in between if you observe the correct timing. This is because paint will marginally dissolve the layer below if it is not too cured, thus forming a chemically structured thicker layer.

Depending on the appearance, dust in the environemnt, your skills with a spray gun or can, the brand of paint used, spitting from dirty nozzels, intention to polish and buff, etc, you may be happy or you may need to sand with 600-1000 grit, preferably wet sanding it, always using a hard rubber block, and then spray again.

With paint, as with primer, remember to spray the edges well then immediately spray the part.

Remember, you most recently applied coat of paint will only look as good as all previous coats/surface quality below. You can never spray paint to cover a run, sag, dent, or any other blemish. All you can do is apply enough paint to that area to allow you to sand it out without burning through, without applying so much paint that it dries improperly and produces a weaker, more chip or blush prone final product.

Its not that hard though, you just have to be patient and realize the preparation is critical for a truly excellent finish.


This is what i am doing, very similar painting process. I have done a lot of research into painting before i under took this project. Thank you smile.gif

I def need to get the higher sand paper for the final layers though, as i think the highest i have is 180-200 grit. Tonight ill be sanding and putting down another layer of primer, so ill have more pictures up when i get home as well as possibly taking the front of the case off and prepping that but im not sure if it comes off in one piece on the 1200 or not...havent really looked at it. If it doesnt, ill have to wait awhile to do that as its currently my only case for my main rig and i still game on a nightly basis. Might take an entire weekend one of these days and just do it but not sure.

Update tonight smile.gif

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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-08-2011, 12:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ilhe4e12345;14868127 
This is what i am doing, very similar painting process. I have done a lot of research into painting before i under took this project. Thank you smile.gif

Sorry, didn't really mean to lecture to you:) I started out intending to simply say multiple layers are OK providing they are applied at a proper thickness and time frame and it turned into a set of guidelines intended for everyone.

Looking forward to the updates and yes, you absolutely need finer sandpaper. You'll spend more time going in circles trying to hide the deep scratches from 220 grit that you'll never finish. Plus, you almost certainly burn through the primer at the edges, which will likely lead to some adhesion problems.

Sounds like a cool build, I look forward to seeing more.
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