[Case Mod] [COMPLETE] December MOTM 2nd Place! - Relic: A BeigeMod First Case Mod - Page 31 - Overclock.net - An Overclocking Community

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[Case Mod] [COMPLETE] December MOTM 2nd Place! - Relic: A BeigeMod First Case Mod

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post #301 of 512 (permalink) Old 10-24-2014, 06:45 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by MR KROGOTH View Post

Best way to block sand anything is to vary sanding directions every 30 seconds or so, go perpendicular from last direction. It keeps the paper from loading up and creating gouging on your surface. You really shouldn't be applying any pressure at all. Let gravity do the work. And you're supposed to sand through primer, that's completely okay. Just shoot a thin coat over it, lightly block, and done. Also, try just using 320-400 grit for blocking, and change paper every 5-10 minutes to keep paper from loading up, or blow it out with blow gun by air compressor(not canned air). Also, you may want to look into getting a thin foam block, for curves. Immensely helpful. Guide coat will save you a lot of pain in the long run.

Thanks, that's very helpful, especially the suggestion for the foam block. What about wet-sanding (which I was doing with the 320+ grit paper) rather than blowing out with compressor? Isn't the point of wet-sanding to keep the paper from loading up?
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Originally Posted by BruceB View Post

Looking nice, that shot of the fan with the edging drool.gif ...I want that too... biggrin.gif

TBH when it Comes to sanding I always use matte paint, not only because I'm a huge fan of it but also because it hides minor dents and scratches so well. With gloss I very rarely get a finish I'm happy with, I usually lose Motivation before I'm happy with the finish redface.gif

Yeah, I thought a satin, not being quite as glossy as semigloss, wouldn't be toooo bad. Man it's tough getting a clean finish. But the end result is gonna be sweet. Just taking a lot of time and rework on my part due to my noobness. wink.gif

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Originally Posted by demons88 View Post

nice modding work instead of just dissemble and assemble.

subbed~

I thank you, good sir, and welcome to the site. I see you are thinking about doing a mod log yourself. I hope my trial and error is useful to you as you stumble your way through.

My best advice is:

Start with something you don't mind ruining and go from there.biggrin.gif



Quote:
Originally Posted by CSCoder4ever View Post

Just looked at the whole case mod, well done!

subbed as well

And thank you as well.
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post #302 of 512 (permalink) Old 10-24-2014, 07:56 AM
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Thanks man. I've definitely turned into a Linux true-believer. In the last 6 months, I've transitioned from being a Windows user, to a dual-boot user, to a Linux with Windows in a Virtual Machine user. Basically, if I can hack it into working in Linux, I use Linux. If it refuses to, then I install it in a VM.

Yeah i agree. Really the limiting factor for me to not move my main system to Linux is because of the software support. The might be alternatives to my software for Linux, but i'm used to the ones i use on Windows. And ofcourse, games are also a limiting factor for me. tongue.gif

On a different note, where did you get the slotted rubber edging? I might actually implement that in my main system because Cooler Master thought it'd be a great idea to not grommet their cable management holes on the HAF 932. thumbsdownsmileyanim.gif
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post #303 of 512 (permalink) Old 10-24-2014, 09:03 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by vaatibal View Post

On a different note, where did you get the slotted rubber edging? I might actually implement that in my main system because Cooler Master thought it'd be a great idea to not grommet their cable management holes on the HAF 932. thumbsdownsmileyanim.gif

Try using this link here:

http://www.performance-pcs.com/catalogsearch/result/?q=grommet+edging

I've had good experience with Performance PCs so far.
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post #304 of 512 (permalink) Old 10-24-2014, 09:09 AM
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Originally Posted by Jhereg10 View Post

Try using this link here:

http://www.performance-pcs.com/catalogsearch/result/?q=grommet+edging

I've had good experience with Performance PCs so far.

Thanks. smile.gif
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post #305 of 512 (permalink) Old 10-27-2014, 04:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Jhereg10 View Post

My best advice is:

Start with something you don't mind ruining and go from there.biggrin.gif
And thank you as well.
^^Best modding advice ever! biggrin.gif
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post #306 of 512 (permalink) Old 10-27-2014, 09:21 AM
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Originally Posted by Jhereg10 View Post

Thanks, that's very helpful, especially the suggestion for the foam block. What about wet-sanding (which I was doing with the 320+ grit paper) rather than blowing out with compressor? Isn't the point of wet-sanding to keep the paper from loading up?
Yeah, I thought a satin, not being quite as glossy as semigloss, wouldn't be toooo bad. Man it's tough getting a clean finish. But the end result is gonna be sweet. Just taking a lot of time and rework on my part due to my noobness. wink.gif
I thank you, good sir, and welcome to the site. I see you are thinking about doing a mod log yourself. I hope my trial and error is useful to you as you stumble your way through.

When I wet sand I always add a few drops of dishsoap to my water, keeps the paper from loading up (Plus it's fun to have bubbles while you are sanding). Are you using good sandpaper? My favorite is the 3M contractor series stuff, it's purple at all grits, I think it goes up to 600. After that I go to an 800 grit of black paper from 3M. Then it goes 1000, 1500, 2000, all from 3M automotive series I think and they are grey paper. Final step for me is 3000 Trizact from 3m, it's less of a paper and more of a foam strip, but it gives you a glassy finish.

I'm just now learning on how to polish metal, basically I go to to 1000 grit or so because I'm lazy then move or to the polishing wheels. Bobbing>Tripoli>White Diamond>finish it off with a Red Rouge. By the time it's done I go to the sink to clean off the compound and water won't even bead on the surface it's so smooth^^.

The paint job doesn't look too bad from what I can see. The biggest thing when priming is to not worry about sanding it off. Your first coat of primer you'll probably sand 90% or so of it off, then maybe 80% on second coat and so on depending on the need. It's a pretty time consuming process and depending on how much the panel flexes it might be difficult to get a great finish.

Another issue if you are using cheaper sandpaper is that it may be shedding it's grit more then it's actually scratching and removing metal, so that could be the majority of dust and debris you are getting while sanding. Also if I remember right you are painting with rattle cans? If you know someone that has a sprayer you can borrow that will help a lot as well.

Reading over your process it looks like you're using 100, 200, 320,800 grit papers? I've never used a combo like that, but when I'm series about getting a nice finish my process would be: 60, 80,100, 150, 180, 220, 320, 400, 600, 800, 1000, 1500, 2000, 3000 (Yes I keep my sandpaper in my book bag in a file folder). It's kind of a fluid process on where you need to jump back in after a application of putty or primer. It's kind of tough because it's not just the bare metal, you have the Fiberglas on extension. If it was just the metal I wouldn't start with such a low grit since it's a pretty decent surface to begin with.If I were doing it I'd probably start at 220 after applying putty or filling primer. Don't be afraid to sand through your coats of paint either. If you put down a layer of red and sand it and start to see primer through it it's no big deal.It's a super time consuming process, but it is pretty relaxing.



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post #307 of 512 (permalink) Old 10-27-2014, 03:52 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by PurdueBoy View Post


The biggest thing when priming is to not worry about sanding it off. Your first coat of primer you'll probably sand 90% or so of it off, then maybe 80% on second coat and so on depending on the need. It's a pretty time consuming process and depending on how much the panel flexes it might be difficult to get a great finish..

I think this is the fundamental bit of knowledge I was missing, right there. Much appreciated for my next job. ;-)

And to answer your other question, I was using 3M automotive sandpapers I bought at the local car parts supply store. Seemed pretty good stuff.
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post #308 of 512 (permalink) Old 10-28-2014, 07:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Jhereg10 View Post

Thanks, that's very helpful, especially the suggestion for the foam block. What about wet-sanding (which I was doing with the 320+ grit paper) rather than blowing out with compressor? Isn't the point of wet-sanding to keep the paper from loading up?

I'd never wet sand with anything less than 600-800 grit. Wet-sanding is more about getting a smooth, flat surface than anything. Water just acts as a lube to prevent dust from gouging into the layers.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jhereg10 View Post

I think this is the fundamental bit of knowledge I was missing, right there. Much appreciated for my next job. ;-)

And to answer your other question, I was using 3M automotive sandpapers I bought at the local car parts supply store. Seemed pretty good stuff.

Thats the best stuff there is.
Once you move into the Trizact stuff (3000+ Grit), that's when stuff really begins to mirror out and shine. dont waste your time with anything above 1200 Grit on anything that isn't the finish/final coat.
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post #309 of 512 (permalink) Old 11-01-2014, 10:37 AM - Thread Starter
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51. Feeling Frisky - Using Artist's Latex Mask for Effects

*cracks knuckles* So today I decided to embark on the final steps of the exterior paint job. For those who need a bit of refreshing, here is the finished base coat, a merlot red satin finish:

AppleMark


The idea was to use this as the undercoat, and mask it off somehow with some sort of freehand pattern, and overcoat it with a satin black. After spending hours digging around the interwebz, I settled on this stuff for the task:

AppleMark

Pros: It goes on as a moderately thick liquid, similar to white liquid glue. However unlike liquid glue, it dries flexible but does not adhere strongly to the underlying paint (supposedly).

But how to apply it? Well I tested out a medicine syringe, and it seemed to work well for my purposes:

AppleMark

The next two shots are the "applying in progress":
AppleMarkAppleMark

One thing I want to point out, I aligned the panels, top and sides, such that they match up with how they will mount on the case. The intent, if I can manage it, is for the pattern to be continuous from side to top to side. It caused a bit of puddling in a few spots, but you know, I think that's going to work well with the overall effect. Here's the finished result:

AppleMark

Now to wait for it to dry (it dries clear) and then paint on the overcoat. The final effect should be a flat or satin black exterior with the merlot-red peeking through wherever I masked it off.

I hope it turns out as good in reality as the picture I see in my head. wink.gif
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post #310 of 512 (permalink) Old 11-01-2014, 10:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jhereg10 View Post

51. Feeling Frisky - Using Artist's Latex Mask for Effects

*cracks knuckles* So today I decided to embark on the final steps of the exterior paint job. For those who need a bit of refreshing, here is the finished base coat, a merlot red satin finish:

AppleMark

The idea was to use this as the undercoat, and mask it off somehow with some sort of freehand pattern, and overcoat it with a satin black. After spending hours digging around the interwebz, I settled on this stuff for the task:

AppleMark

Pros: It goes on as a moderately thick liquid, similar to white liquid glue. However unlike liquid glue, it dries flexible but does not adhere strongly to the underlying paint (supposedly).

But how to apply it? Well I tested out a medicine syringe, and it seemed to work well for my purposes:

AppleMark

The next two shots are the "applying in progress":
AppleMarkAppleMark

One thing I want to point out, I aligned the panels, top and sides, such that they match up with how they will mount on the case. The intent, if I can manage it, is for the pattern to be continuous from side to top to side. It caused a bit of puddling in a few spots, but you know, I think that's going to work well with the overall effect. Here's the finished result:

AppleMark

Now to wait for it to dry (it dries clear) and then paint on the overcoat. The final effect should be a flat or satin black exterior with the merlot-red peeking through wherever I masked it off.

I hope it turns out as good in reality as the picture I see in my head. wink.gif

This is exactly what I had planned to do with my beige mod.


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