[Build Log] The Big Red "Devastator" CaseLabs THW10 - Custom Powder Coating - Page 44 - Overclock.net - An Overclocking Community

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[Build Log] The Big Red "Devastator" CaseLabs THW10 - Custom Powder Coating

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post #431 of 523 (permalink) Old 12-16-2018, 10:08 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote: Originally Posted by ruffhi View Post
Looks excellent.

I know that you will catch this ... but ... just in case ... the radiator on the left has an open port .

Hey ruffhi thanks for looking out! You are always so observant!

Just out of the view of that picture the lower rad has a stop plug removed too. In fact every radiator has at least one open port right now. I was leak testing the chassis awhile back, then shortly after that I decided to change from using all fittings to bending tube. Since there was some residual water left in the radiators I just opened them up to air it out some. I have been putting the stop plugs back in whenever I have been taking any pictures, but I forgot to put them in for that set of pictures


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post #432 of 523 (permalink) Old 12-16-2018, 12:47 PM - Thread Starter
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Making the Video Card Power Cables – Sleeving Tools

In this post I’m going cover making the video card cables, and I’m going to show you all of the tools I use as well. I’m won’t be doing a full on “sleeving guide”, if you aren’t familiar with sleeving cables I suggest watching some of the sleeving videos on youtube. I will however show you a few tips that may be helpful.

First let’s take a look at some of the tools I use. Starting with the top left, if you don’t have good lighting these headband lights work great! To the right are tweezers, MDPC-X pinremover, Molex pinremover, X-acto knife, small screw driver, MDPC-X CTX3 Crimp Tool , wire strippers, lighter, ratcheting screw driver with interchangeable tips, two wire cutters, small needle nose pliers, scissors, PA-09 Engineer Micro Crimpers, and Knipex wire strippers.




These are probably the two most important tools. There are several versions of the Knipex wire strippers, this one will work on wire as small as 32 gauge, which is nice when you are working with thin wires like fan wiring. The cheaper versions are not rated for the smaller sizes of wire.

I have the older style of the original MDPC-X Crimp Tool which worked great. This new style CTX version of the tool is even better. The smallest crimp jaws I use for fan pins, the middle one for ATX pins, and the largest size for Molex pins.




The PA-09 Engineer Micro Crimpers is the one to use for small pins like the Dupont pins in USB cables. The bottom wire stripper/crimper tool I only use when I want to cut out a piece of insulation in the middle of the wire like when soldering another wire on for making a “double wire”.




MDPC-X Molex and ATX pin removing tools.




This Dremel Butane torch is what I use for melting the sleeving to the connector pins. It works much better than a ligher!




One tip that really helps to make your cables easy to “train” or bend to stay in the shape you want is to remember that the “the curve is your friend”!

When you crimp your first pin on your wire make sure you clock the pin correctly so when it goes into the connector body with the natural curve of the wire is already going the way you want it to.

I originally purchased 100 feet of the Titanium Grey sleeving. Good thing I ordered more recently as the piece of sleeve you see here is literally for the last grey wire I needed. I would have been less that one foot short of that sleeving. I also would have been short exactly two ATX pins!




Ready for some cable combs and the first connector body.




In most builds the video card power cables are routed from a pass through hole in the top back of the case straight down and curving into the video cards, or the cables are routed from a pass through hole in the back of the case at the bottom, and straight up into the video cards.

The top pass through hole in this case has a thick USB 3.0 cable running through it, as well as the power/rest cables, and a five pin USB cable, so there really isn’t enough room there for four eight pin power cables. The bottom pass through hole has the eight and four pin motherboard power cables, so not enough room there either.

I do have enough room in the pass through in the center of the case right above were the SATA cables go through, and below the other two power cables one of which goes to the HDDs. Plus the power supply is located right behind this top most center pass through.




On the back side the video card cables will route behind the 24 pin cable.




I was originally planning to make four separate eight pin power cables. After I made the first eight pin cable, I came up with the idea to make the two eight pin cables for each video card like one big 16 pin cable by using 16 pin cable combs. This way I could keep all the wires together very nicely, and make the cables sweep in from the side.

I didn’t have any 16 pin combs, so I had to order some. Good thing I also ordered more Titanium Grey sleeving, and ATX pins while I was at it! So I removed the eight pin combs from the first cable I made and put the new 16 pin combs on. Here I’m ready to cut the ends off the second set of eight wires.




I put this towel down to keeps any small wire or sleeving pieces from getting into anything below it.




Then a piece of masking tape across the wire ends on the backplate, and I cut the wires off evenly against the edge of the video card.




The tape got most of the little end pieces.




It was really easy to decide what color pattern to use here! Like all of the power cables I’ll stick with the theme of mostly red with some black and grey. I’m going to basically match the pattern of the 24 pin cable, except one red wire on the outside instead of two, and two red wires down the center instead of four.

Here’s the first video card cable set finished and installed. Take a look at the bottom grey wire on the 24 pin cable. It’s a little short, and a little tight so I’ll be swapping that out for a longer wire here shortly.




These cables make a tight flat 180° bend at the video card, then slightly crunch together while making a 90° counter clockwise twist while going through the center divider of the case, and then another 90° bend going into the power supply on the back side.

The second cable set is ready to get cut to length, get the pins crimped on, and the last two connectors installed.




I really like how these cable combs easily slide up and down the length of the cable! It makes it so you can adjust them just right. The second cable is all done here.




Before I install these cables I must test them! I have a spare power supply here on the bench which is much easier than using the power supply already installed. This is the read out of the 24 pin cable.




This is the read out of the video cable. All four check out good




You can call it being paranoid… but I’d call it being “extra careful”… as I check all the powers and grounds on the cables with my digital volt meter too!




I did pull the 24 pin cable out to swap out the lower grey wire. I have messed around trying to adjust it numerous times while it’s been installed, but that one wire is just a little too short. Although it’s really minor, and really didn’t look that bad, it bugs me. So now’s the time to fix it!




All the power cables are now completed.






Now the 24 pin cable is as good as I can get it.




Here’s the first shot of the power supply with all the cables complete. You can see the video card cables sweep in nicely behind the 24 pin cable, and below the eight and four pin motherboard cables. The two cables below that are used to power all of the Splitty9 fan hubs.

All five Aux/Perf ports are being used:
  • Both pumps
  • SSD hot swap bays
  • Aquaeros and Farbwerk
  • Hard disk drives
  • Motherboard molex power



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Last edited by Barefooter; 12-16-2018 at 12:52 PM.
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post #433 of 523 (permalink) Old 12-16-2018, 01:45 PM
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@Barefooter Excellent post!!! Reminds me of the days before the migration to VerticalScope.

Btw, that Dremel 2000-01 torch is currently on sale, just in case anyone wants to pick up that kit. Thanks for the link, BF


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post #434 of 523 (permalink) Old 12-16-2018, 04:00 PM
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Nice to see this build is still going, and that sleeving is looking pretty awesome

CHILLER DESTRUCTION
Build Log - White Voodoo
Z390 Station
(10 items)
White Voodoo
(14 items)
CPU
9900K @ 5.5 1.46v
Motherboard
EVGA Z390 Dark
GPU
Titan RTX 2085/8500
RAM
Trident Z 3200c14 @ 4133c16 1.5v
Hard Drive
Samsung 970 Evo Plus 250gb
Power Supply
EVGA 1300 G2
Cooling
Dehumidifier
Case
Dimastech Test Bench
Monitor
AOC Agon AG251FZ 240Hz
Audio
Built-in Monitor Speakers (3 watt)
CPU
Intel Core i9-7980XE @ 4.3 GHz 1.10v
Motherboard
Asus Rampage VI Apex
GPU
Gigabyte Aorus Waterforce WB 1080 Ti SLI 2037/6318 1.09V
RAM
Trident Z 32GB (4x8GB) 3200C14 @ 3800C16 1.50V
Hard Drive
Samsung 960 Evo 1TB
Power Supply
EVGA 1600 T2
Cooling
HWLabs Nemesis GTR 420+280 Rads
Cooling
(7) Noctua NF-A14 iPPC-3000 PWM Fans
Cooling
EK-XRES 140 Revo D5 RGB PWM
Case
LD Cooling PC-V7 280/420
Operating System
Windows 10 LTSB
Operating System
Linux Mint 19.1
Monitor
NEC PA271W 2560x1440
Keyboard
Razer Blackwidow Chroma V2
CPU
Dual Intel Xeon L5520 2.26 GHz
RAM
48 GB Samsung DDR3-1066
Hard Drive
120 GB Samsung 750 Evo SSD
Hard Drive
2 TB Western Digital Green
Hard Drive
2 TB Hitachi 7200 RPM
Power Supply
650W Delta PSU
Case
1U Rackmount
Operating System
Ubuntu Server 16.04
▲ hide details ▲
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post #435 of 523 (permalink) Old 12-17-2018, 02:10 PM
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In the 5 or 6 years, I've been on OCN, this has to be in the top 5 most planned and thoroughly documented build logs on the site. I'm sorry, but OCN no longer deserves to be the go-to for these kinds of builds. It's sad that on a 150 Mbps connection, I have to wait 2-3 minutes sometimes for a full page of photos to load.

Anyway, I am amazed at the attention to detail and quality of each and every bolt and wire on this build. So here I sit and go through every post in order to come somewhere within the ballpark with the work on my re-build. I'll skip photos for sake of rude hijacking. But you should know your work is inspiring.
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post #436 of 523 (permalink) Old 12-17-2018, 05:18 PM
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Thank you and a thought for your consideration.

Dear Barefooter.

Three things" best wishes to you and yours for a happy and healthy holiday; try borosilicate glass vs. PETG tubing; and a heart felt thank you!
As a long-term lurker here I eagerly await my weekly OCN up-dates to your build log.

This week's updates is why I am compiled to inflict myself. You not only shared the what but the how; thank you sir. It is rather hard to provide specifics after following for so long.

What you have shared and shared this week, is a pearl beyond price. A pearl I shall emulate as best I am able.

Borosilicate glass bending is really not that hard. If I can, anybody else can. For such a magnificent build glass vs. PETG is such a small step.

And before I return to my cage and my lurking, Thank you for all you are sharing. I am and have learned a lot from you and just wanted you to know it is valued.

Just remember that hot glass looks exactly like cool glass. If I can share some thoughts about working with glass please PM me. Please also know if it were hard I could not do it.

Respectfully yours,

MM
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post #437 of 523 (permalink) Old 12-17-2018, 06:15 PM
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Fantastic cable management. I could only dream to get mine to such perfection. Well done sir.

I too had to wait a while for the photos to load... thought my network was down for a minute there.

Join [email protected] and save lives!


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post #438 of 523 (permalink) Old 12-21-2018, 01:40 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote: Originally Posted by iamjanco View Post
@Barefooter Excellent post!!! Reminds me of the days before the migration to VerticalScope.

Btw, that Dremel 2000-01 torch is currently on sale, just in case anyone wants to pick up that kit. Thanks for the link, BF
Thank you, and yes… “the good old days” when there were far more contributing members!



Quote: Originally Posted by Hydroplane View Post
Nice to see this build is still going, and that sleeving is looking pretty awesome
Yes it’s still going and going and going

Getting close to the end now though.



Quote: Originally Posted by B3L13V3R View Post
In the 5 or 6 years, I've been on OCN, this has to be in the top 5 most planned and thoroughly documented build logs on the site. I'm sorry, but OCN no longer deserves to be the go-to for these kinds of builds. It's sad that on a 150 Mbps connection, I have to wait 2-3 minutes sometimes for a full page of photos to load.

Anyway, I am amazed at the attention to detail and quality of each and every bolt and wire on this build. So here I sit and go through every post in order to come somewhere within the ballpark with the work on my re-build. I'll skip photos for sake of rude hijacking. But you should know your work is inspiring.
The fact that I upload large file size pictures isn’t helping the page download speeds.

Thanks so much for the kind words, and glad you find it inspiring!



Quote: Originally Posted by Mad Monk View Post
Dear Barefooter.

Three things" best wishes to you and yours for a happy and healthy holiday; try borosilicate glass vs. PETG tubing; and a heart felt thank you!
As a long-term lurker here I eagerly await my weekly OCN up-dates to your build log.

This week's updates is why I am compiled to inflict myself. You not only shared the what but the how; thank you sir. It is rather hard to provide specifics after following for so long.

What you have shared and shared this week, is a pearl beyond price. A pearl I shall emulate as best I am able.

Borosilicate glass bending is really not that hard. If I can, anybody else can. For such a magnificent build glass vs. PETG is such a small step.

And before I return to my cage and my lurking, Thank you for all you are sharing. I am and have learned a lot from you and just wanted you to know it is valued.

Just remember that hot glass looks exactly like cool glass. If I can share some thoughts about working with glass please PM me. Please also know if it were hard I could not do it.

Respectfully yours,

MM
Happy holidays to you as well Mad Monk. I remember you were one of the first subscribers here.

Thanks for the suggestion of the Borosilicate tubing. I did actually consider using Borosilicate tubing, but only very briefly. I will admit that the glass tube looks spectacular! But it’s not leaps and bounds better looking than acrylic or PETG tubing in my opinion.

Plus it is much more difficult to work with, and the glass powder can be a serious health hazard without proper care. Take a look at this build log.

lever2stacks the builder on that log does glass work, and tube bending for a living. After reading through that build log I decided for sure against using Borosilicate tubing.

So the Borosilicate tubing looks slightly better, but is significantly more difficult to work with and from what I’ve seen it is much more likely to break and/or leak than PETG tubing.

Additionally having all the tubing perfectly level horizontally and vertically is very important to me. I’ve taken pieces of tubing out to literally shave one mm off the end to make it fit better. You can’t do that with glass tubing.

Some of the tubing runs in this build like the one going from the reservoirs to the pump top would be nearly impossible to do with glass even with all the proper equipment. So there is my long winded reasoning for not using Borosilicate glass tubing

I may give the Borosilicate tubing a try in the future with a much smaller build with minimal tubing runs.



Quote: Originally Posted by maestro0428 View Post
Fantastic cable management. I could only dream to get mine to such perfection. Well done sir.

I too had to wait a while for the photos to load... thought my network was down for a minute there.
Thank you and glad to have you following along!



I'm hoping to get one more update posted here before Christmas next week.


.


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post #439 of 523 (permalink) Old 12-30-2018, 10:00 AM - Thread Starter
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Final Air Pressure Test - Water Leak Testing - Fire it up!

I was originally planning to install the waterblocks on the video cards, and then just put them into the system without even testing them. I have never received a video card that died early on, however with all of the chatter of these 2080 Ti cards dying after only a few weeks of use, I thought I should go ahead and test them out first.

Plus I am still waiting for the video card waterblocks, and I’m not sure when I will receive them. Most likely it will be at least a few weeks away, so I decided to just put a piece of soft tube from the out port of the CPU block up to the SSD waterblock, bypassing the video cards.

I made the piece of soft tubing large, so that I can easily remove the video cards and test one video card at a time if I want to.




I am going to air pressure test the system one more time before putting water in. This is a large system and it would take a long time to pump it up with a bike pump, so I’ll be using my air compressor to put air in.

WARNING: Do not attempt this unless your air compressor has a pressure regulator that will allow you to turn the pressure down to less than 10 psi, and you verify that with your air pressure gauge, not just the one on the air compressor itself.

If you apply more than 10 psi, you would be lucky if you only popped off a tube some place. More seriously you could also severely damage your radiators, or other parts of your water cooling system.




I put in exactly 7.5 psi, and it appears to be holding




I let this sit overnight for about 30 hours in all, and it lost less than .25 psi. That is within the amount that can fluctuate due to the temperature change overnight in my work shop. If there was a leak, it would have gone down much further.




I plan to run Blitz Part 2 through the system one more time before putting the actual coolant in the system after the video card blocks get added. Since I have some red dyes, I’m mixing up some blood red dye into some distilled water, so we can better see what it will actually look like with coolant in the system.

The last time I put water in the system I did the initial fill from the top radiator ports. Today I’ll use this fill bottle, and fill it through the reservoir on the back side this time.




I’ve got an extra power supply on the shelf of the cart with my custom “pump power cable” connected to the connector for the pumps. This way I can leave all the rest of the cabling in place.
I put about 1 ½ quarts of my red dye water into the system.








I then cracked open the vents on the top two radiators, and was able to get another quart of fluid in. Now there is about 2 ½ quarts of fluid in the system before I even turn the pumps on.






I run the pumps briefly to until the fluid is getting low in the reservoirs, then add almost another 1 ½ quarts, now there is almost 4 quarts of fluid added.




After running the pumps the second time, I added one more quart for a total of five quarts, and now I can just let the system run. The fluid looks pretty good here.






I added a sixth quart which got me close to the top of the reservoirs, then let the system run with just the pumps for two days straight. After carefully examining for leaks… there is none to be found!

What is strange is that after just two days the red dye has severely faded! It’s a little darker in the reservoirs, but in the tubing the coloring is very faint.






I’ve had this hardware running on the test bench, but have not yet fired it up inside the case, or with water cooling in place.

Ok here we go… the first push of the start button




There’s always a little uneasy anticipation the first time starting a new rig. All is ok though it fires right up






I finally received my coolant order from Mod My Mods. Apparently they had to order it, because they do not stock it even though they list it on their web site.




Next up is one of my favorite things to do… overclocking the CPU! I’ll spend at least a few weeks dialing in the CPU overclock, and then I’ll put the video cards through the paces as well.

Signing out for 2018! I hope you all have a safe and Happy New Year!

See you in 2019


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post #440 of 523 (permalink) Old 01-02-2019, 09:31 AM
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Quote: Originally Posted by Barefooter View Post
What is strange is that after just two days the red dye has severely faded! It’s a little darker in the reservoirs, but in the tubing the coloring is very faint.
Can't be happy about that .

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