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post #171 of 185 (permalink) Old 02-15-2011, 10:15 PM
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Originally Posted by veritas-truth View Post
I have a question and a little info this thread may find interesting.

First my question: if a mobo uses an 8 pin connection for the CPU, but the PSU has 2 4 pin connectors, can the two 4 pins be used to fill the 8 pin? I have read that they can usually run on a single 4 pin connector

Now the interesting info: Car amplifiers (for speaker and subs) use 12V DC power, so you can use a PSU to power a car amp and speakers. All you have to do is make a jumper like this guide states; take any 12V output from the PSU and attach one to the 12V power and one to the Remote line (what tells the amp to power on, so you can put a switch in the path to control the amps power) then hook up your speakers and you're good to go.
this is provided it puts out enough amperage/watts or not to much for your little car stereo setup. 12v is pretty common in daily life, most cars are 12, some older 6. mine was converted to 12 so were good


also, thread bump.



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post #172 of 185 (permalink) Old 02-15-2011, 10:19 PM
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Car batteries actually output around 13.6V.

And 9V batteries are 9.6V.

And AA batteries actually have a slightly higher voltage than D cells, but less mAh.

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post #173 of 185 (permalink) Old 02-15-2011, 11:58 PM
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Car batteries actually output around 13.6V.
In my experience, resting voltage typically measures 11.5-11.8. A typical charging source would roughly be 13.5-14.5

There is no exact answer due to many variables. I admit most of my experience comes from sailboat systems with adjustable multi-stage smart chargers.
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post #174 of 185 (permalink) Old 03-04-2011, 10:20 PM
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You're not going to really power a giant car amp with it, but the old 200W PSU from an old win 98 machine I had powered my 100W sony amp just fine and i had that pushing 2 8ohm bookshelf speakers rated at 30W each and an older 12" 8ohm home sub at 20W; it was a decent little system. I think I had the bookshelves wired in series together and then the sub bridged in parallel with the bookshelves so it was a 5.33ohm load since the amp was stable to 4 ohms
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post #175 of 185 (permalink) Old 04-04-2011, 10:12 AM
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I've heard a lot of places that if you do this, you need to have a constant load on the psu or you can damage it... any truth to that? I'm using a crappy 280w psu that I had laying around to power a custom slot car track biggrin.gif but i have an 80mm fan hooked up to one of the 5v lines (red) to give it load just in case...

Is my fan necessary? My (very limited) knowledge of electronics tells me that at the very most, all i would really need is a small load for a short time after it is turned on to charge up the caps's
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post #176 of 185 (permalink) Old 04-04-2011, 10:18 AM
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Originally Posted by ccrunner863;12997223 
I've heard a lot of places that if you do this, you need to have a constant load on the psu or you can damage it... any truth to that? I'm using a crappy 280w psu that I had laying around to power a custom slot car track biggrin.gif but i have an 80mm fan hooked up to one of the 5v lines (red) to give it load just in case...

Is my fan necessary? My (very limited) knowledge of electronics tells me that at the very most, all i would really need is a small load for a short time after it is turned on to charge up the caps's


It depends on the unit. A group-regulated unit would require a minimum load on all rails in order to deliver stable power. A single fan on the +5V rail would not be enough to offset the problems you may encounter in a group-regulated unit when crossloading.



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post #177 of 185 (permalink) Old 04-04-2011, 11:18 AM
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Originally Posted by Shub;12997276 
It depends on the unit. A group-regulated unit would require a minimum load on all rails in order to deliver stable power. A single fan on the +5V rail would not be enough to offset the problems you may encounter in a group-regulated unit when crossloading.

So will neglecting to load the 5v rail actually hurt any of the PSU's internal circuitry? (and is there an easy way to tell if it's group-regulated?)
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post #178 of 185 (permalink) Old 04-04-2011, 11:26 AM
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I don't know if it would hurt the internal circuitry, but depending on what effect crossloading is having in the electrical output, it may damage whatever is connected to the PSU.
I don't know if it's possible to tell if a PSU is group-regulated just by looking at the guts. If it is, then I'm not knowledgeable enough to tell. If you can't tell from looking at the guts, then you'd need a load tester.



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post #179 of 185 (permalink) Old 04-04-2011, 12:55 PM
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You can tell if a PSU is group regulated by looking for coils on the secondary. Basically, look at where all the wires connect to the board, next to them will be lots of capacitors and a number of large chokes like this:

2010111914443136420.jpg

Three coils = Independent regulated (safe to crossload)
Two coils = Group regulated (NOT safe to crossload)
One coil + daughterboard = DC-DC (safe to crossload (+12V-heavy crossload only--+5V crossload not recommended))
One coil = Group regulated with 3.3V regulated from +5V (probably a piece of garbage, so don't load it at all)

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post #180 of 185 (permalink) Old 04-04-2011, 01:03 PM
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Independent regulated:
Antec HCG-900
DSCF2156.JPG

Group regulated:
SeaSonic S12II 520W
DSCF2264.JPG

DC-DC regulated:
Antec TruePower New 750W
DSCF0572.JPG

Group regulated with linear regulated +3.3V:
Linkworld LPSW 350W
DSCF0332.jpg

Burning books is like burning bras; after the adrenaline rush of the symbolic moment wears off all you're left with is a pile of ashes and unsupported boobs.
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