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UPS and Active PFC

 
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post #1 of 4 (permalink) Old 11-11-2014, 07:04 PM - Thread Starter
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I'm looking for a UPS (not PSU) to back up my PC (Corsair TX 650 V2), my monitor, speakers, TV and maybe a PS4.

Can someone explain to me what this Active PFC regulation is?

Also, "pure sine wave" is another term I see used, why do these things matter when looking for a UPS?

I've heard some Active PFC electronics can malfunction or even get damaged when connected to a UPS that is not compatible with the regulation.

Just "PC"
(20 items)
CPU
Intel Core i5 3570K @ 4.3GHz - 1.15v
Motherboard
GIGABYTE GA-Z77X-UD3H
GPU
Sapphire Nitro+ RX 580 SE 1430/2100MHz
RAM
Corsair Vengeance 16GB(4x4) @ 1600MHz
Hard Drive
SanDisk Ultra II 480GB
Hard Drive
WD CB 1TB
Hard Drive
Seagate 3TB
Optical Drive
DVD-RW
Power Supply
Corsair TX 650 V2 650W
Cooling
CM Hyper 212 Evo
Case
CM Storm Enforcer
Operating System
Windows 10 Pro x64
Monitor
LG 29UM69G-B
Keyboard
CM Storm QuickFire Pro (Brown switches)
Mouse
Logitech G203 Prodigy
Audio
ASUS Xonar DG
Audio
Samson SR850 Headphones
Audio
Logitech LS11 2.0 Speakers
Audio
FiiO E10K
Other
CyberPower CP1500PFCLCD 1500VA/900W
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post #2 of 4 (permalink) Old 11-11-2014, 08:25 PM
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Power Factor Correction
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Power Factor Correction (PFC)

Power Factor Correction (PFC) allows power distribution to operate at its maximum efficiency.

There are two types of PFC, Active PFC and Passive PFC. All of our power supplies are either Active PFC Power Supplies or Passive PFC Power Supplies.

Most quality power supplies include Active PFC. Currently only lower quality power supplies use Passive PFC. Most people prefer to use Active PFC power supplies since Active PFC is more efficient and does not require manual switching when switching between different voltage (depending on which part of the world you are).

Inside A Power Supply

Active PFC

The preferable type of PFC is Active Power Factor Correction (Active PFC) since it provides more efficient power frequency. Because Active PFC uses a circuit to correct power factor, Active PFC is able to generate a theoretical power factor of over 95%. Active Power Factor Correction also markedly diminishes total harmonics, automatically corrects for AC input voltage, and is capable of a full range of input voltage. Since Active PFC is the more complex method of Power Factor Correction, it is more expensive to produce an Active PFC power supply.

Passive PFC

Passive PFC uses a capacitive filter at the AC input to correct poor power factor. Passive PFC may be affected when environmental vibration occurs. Passive PFC requires that the AC input voltage be set manually. Passive PFC also does not use the full energy potential of the AC line.

Non-PFC

Non-PFC power supplies are no longer recommended. In Europe, power supplies are now required to have either active PFC or passive PFC.


Alternating current outputs sine wave and direct current is pure.



Since UPS has a battery, DC voltage has to be inverted to AC voltage, thus creating artificial sine wave (in cheap UPS's). That's why they created UPS with "pure sine wave" output as if the UPS acts like true a AC wall outlet.

Addressing to the Active PFC and "Pure sine wave" UPS question, here's the answer from Cyberpower.
Quote:
"Your computer uses a power supply that utilizes Active Power Factor Correction (Active PFC) to improve efficiency. Power supplies with active PFC may experience incompatibility problems with a UPS that does not provide pure sine wave power output when the power supply switches from AC power to UPS battery power. As a result, when a computer system using a power supply with active PFC is attached to a non-sine wave UPS, the system may shut down when it switches to battery power. Also, if the power supply continues to operate, it may produce a humming or high pitch noise while running on battery. This humming indicates the power supply is operating beyond specified tolerances and may damage the power supply.
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post #3 of 4 (permalink) Old 11-11-2014, 09:37 PM - Thread Starter
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So it could potentially damage the PSU.

That sucks since where I live there are no PFC UPS, and they are more expensive as well.

Just "PC"
(20 items)
CPU
Intel Core i5 3570K @ 4.3GHz - 1.15v
Motherboard
GIGABYTE GA-Z77X-UD3H
GPU
Sapphire Nitro+ RX 580 SE 1430/2100MHz
RAM
Corsair Vengeance 16GB(4x4) @ 1600MHz
Hard Drive
SanDisk Ultra II 480GB
Hard Drive
WD CB 1TB
Hard Drive
Seagate 3TB
Optical Drive
DVD-RW
Power Supply
Corsair TX 650 V2 650W
Cooling
CM Hyper 212 Evo
Case
CM Storm Enforcer
Operating System
Windows 10 Pro x64
Monitor
LG 29UM69G-B
Keyboard
CM Storm QuickFire Pro (Brown switches)
Mouse
Logitech G203 Prodigy
Audio
ASUS Xonar DG
Audio
Samson SR850 Headphones
Audio
Logitech LS11 2.0 Speakers
Audio
FiiO E10K
Other
CyberPower CP1500PFCLCD 1500VA/900W
▲ hide details ▲
xutnubu is offline  
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post #4 of 4 (permalink) Old 11-14-2014, 01:16 AM
QxY
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I bought a Tripp Lite UPS with simulated sinewave a while back and it works absolutely fine. While the PSU makes a buzzing noise when running on battery, I doubt it's going to do any damage to it. Good quality PSUs can take a lot of abuse before giving out.

Here is a big thread on JonnyGuru discussing the same topic:
http://www.jonnyguru.com/forums/showthread.php?t=3964

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