which is more dangerous for PC on 12V rail : 11.5V or 12.5V ?? - Overclock.net - An Overclocking Community

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which is more dangerous for PC on 12V rail : 11.5V or 12.5V ??

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post #1 of 24 (permalink) Old 12-22-2018, 11:06 AM - Thread Starter
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which is more dangerous for PC on 12V rail : 11.5V or 12.5V ??

first question of its kind so no point googling ^^

question's in the title

so everyone saying that if voltage (especially 12V rail ie. the important rail cause all the precious stuff is fed by this one) is unstable & strays too far from base then it's dangerous

so too much voltage is dangerous (understandable)
but too little voltage is also dangerous (go figure but hey if they say so)


so my question is: for a GIVEN difference - says, 0.5V - which is more dangerous (say, for GPU or CPU): 0.5V less or 0.5V more?
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post #2 of 24 (permalink) Old 12-23-2018, 05:11 PM
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Most dangerous? Neither will cause things to explode and hurt you... so neither?

Droop will cause instability, overvoltage might damage parts.

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post #3 of 24 (permalink) Old 12-23-2018, 05:56 PM
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Version 2.2 of the ATX Specification specs the following about +12VDC:

Code:
Voltage Rail	Tolerance	Minimum Voltage	Maximum Voltage
+12VDC		± 5%		+11.400 VDC	+12.600 VDC
While the ATX spec is an older spec, Intel's Desktop Platform Form Factors Power Supply Design Guide (Rev 002, dated June 2018) agrees with those tolerances (at peak loading times):

Click image for larger version

Name:	2018-12-23_20-53-11v2.jpg
Views:	60
Size:	246.5 KB
ID:	240904

Like The Pook implied though, always best to try to stay as close to a spec'd voltage as possible.



Last edited by iamjanco; 12-23-2018 at 06:03 PM.
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post #4 of 24 (permalink) Old 12-23-2018, 06:37 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote: Originally Posted by The Pook View Post
Most dangerous? Neither will cause things to explode and hurt you... so neither?

Droop will cause instability, overvoltage might damage parts.
I of cos meant dangerous for lifespan of the PC not of the user :|


so 12.5V damages & shortens components lifespan (CPU, GPU) more than 11.5V does?
you sure??

(if the voltage difference ain't that high then I can reformulate the question: 11V vs 13V which is more dangerous? ^^)
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post #5 of 24 (permalink) Old 12-23-2018, 06:45 PM
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They are still the same sort of dangrous.

Lower voltage is going to draw more current (fry traces, plugs, wires) or straight out unstable.
Higher voltage will damage parts. Its going to be closer to 15V before you start having instant frying of stuff since the voltage regulation circuits are going to use 15V capacitors at a minimum on your 12v stuff.


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post #6 of 24 (permalink) Old 12-23-2018, 06:47 PM
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A good PSU will shut down before it hits 11v or 13v, but I've never heard of lack of voltage killing anything. If you run your CPU at 1.0v it'll likely BSOD and be unusable but at 2.0v you'll just kill it. Can't imagine a PSU or any other component being any different.

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post #7 of 24 (permalink) Old 12-23-2018, 06:55 PM
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Quote: Originally Posted by The Pook View Post
If you run your CPU at 1.0v it'll likely BSOD and be unusable but at 2.0v you'll just kill it. Can't imagine a PSU or any other component being any different.
Cant really compare it like that since thats the voltage supplied by the internally regulated circuit inside CPU to the cores, The damage will happen before the regulators inside the component.

Easier way to understand why low voltage will damage is because if something needs 300W say the GPU before it goes though its VRMs to supply that voltage the cores want.

300W with 11V rail thats 27.3amps
300W with 13V thats 23.1 amps.


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post #8 of 24 (permalink) Old 12-23-2018, 06:59 PM
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In my job usually sell computers with VERY cheap ass power supply that in some cases exploded on the first power on lol.
Overvoltage can kill the hardware. I see some cheap ass PSU with 14.0V on the 12V+ killing a motherboard in 1s and in some cases also damage the CPU and RAM. Undervoltage usually after sometime melt connectors because increase the current, but I never see dead hardware for this problem, just the CPU power connector melted, replace the connector and the motherboard work just fine.
Ripple is also very bad for the components, specially capacitors. I see some PSU with severe ripple making pop corn of a motherboard

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post #9 of 24 (permalink) Old 12-23-2018, 08:06 PM
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115V and 125V are both dangerous.

You're fine as long as the 12V rail is within spec as mentioned above.

High voltage can kill capacitors and FETs. Say around 16V, depends largely on parts selection and their rating.

Say your GPU consumes 240W = 20A and 12V. At 11V that is 21.82A, it's not going to melt your connectors At 6V... at which it would not run probably anyway but for theoretical purposes lets say it still does... it would draw, if it could even keep up the full 240W power draw (often power draw goes down with lower voltage), 40A, then sure it can melt things if the card was designed for say 25A max (300W at 12V).

Why are PCs still using 12V and not 24V or higher? Beats me, mostly because of legacy probably.
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post #10 of 24 (permalink) Old 12-23-2018, 08:07 PM
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If you feed something less voltage and it's able to have the same output with said voltage, ohms law says it must be pulling more current to make up the difference. I'm not sure it this applies to the PC or not since the components do not feed directly from the PSU, the power is stepped up and down. I'm not sure what it's called but there are little chips that can regulate output and keep it the same even if the input voltage drops, this will cause it to draw more current. If the VRM is fed by something like this I don't think too little voltage will harm the CPU or VRM as it will be getting the same power either way but I'm not a rocket doctor and I don't know exactly how much bucking/stepping and filtering the 12v power goes through before reaching the VRM.

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