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best place for temp probe on psu

 
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post #1 of 5 (permalink) Old 01-06-2019, 07:58 PM - Thread Starter
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best place for temp probe on psu

running the new asus thor 1200w psu. its built off the seasonic platform with beefed up cooling and heatsinks. its strangely designed with an upward facing fan if you want to use the wattage screen and leds. since im using this psu in a case with a basement it doesnt have quality airflow so i want to know the best place to temp prob it to get an idea of its temps. is exhaust air adequate enough and if so any guesses what i would need to add to know internal component temps? it has never otp tripped on me even after a few hours of gaming but damn does it get toasty. thanks
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post #2 of 5 (permalink) Old 01-07-2019, 01:57 AM
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If you want to open it up, on one of the heatsinks next to a mosfet. But all modern PSUs should have over temperature protection, amongst many other protections.

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post #3 of 5 (permalink) Old 01-07-2019, 07:03 PM
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Is that your case in the picture? A basement in a computer tower, I like that. But your's doesn't have air holes for the PSU ? Or enough?, why not cut some holes in it if u have the tools

What do cases like that weigh ?

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post #4 of 5 (permalink) Old 01-07-2019, 07:46 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote: Originally Posted by Kaltenbrunner View Post
Is that your case in the picture? A basement in a computer tower, I like that. But your's doesn't have air holes for the PSU ? Or enough?, why not cut some holes in it if u have the tools

What do cases like that weigh ?
i do own that case but its in the evolv x. did a new smaller build.
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post #5 of 5 (permalink) Old 01-16-2019, 02:42 PM
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If u know electronics, and have a few bucks to spend, u could put a NTC or PTC on all the MOSFETs, main diodes, or any where useful, and set up circuits or programs to act on that info. There are many many things observed and compared in electronic circuits. So they all have numbers with them.

Normally the big ATX SMPS makers, put a negative-temperature-coefficient sensor on the secondary side heatsink. The secondary-side rectifier diodes are on that heatsink. That NTC hooks into op-amp circuits, like LM393 comparators or LM358 op-amps. And they use RLC circuits to get certain things happen, at certain frequencies.

U can roughly get the internal temp of most parts if u know the surface temp, I should really learn some equations for this.


Last edited by Kaltenbrunner; 01-16-2019 at 02:51 PM.
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