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post #11 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-01-2019, 08:12 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote: Originally Posted by azeures View Post
Actually it's simple. Just plug in the power LED connector to the HDD pins on your motherboard.
k thx I didn't think of that

welp...I did that & the case power led still doesn't light up

however when I do the reverse (connect the case HDD led to the mobo's PLED pins) then it works the HDD led lights up like a power led

so at least I know the mobo pins are working


so the problem's with the case either the led itself or the 2 connectors & wires leading to the led - so question is HOW THEF can something that simple stop working? these things are suppose to last longer than us ffs

(and how can I test if it's the led or the wires/connectors - that case ain't easy to disassemble on the front especially since it has a usb3 front panel + triple fan cable going into the case & I don't wanna risk ripping those off)
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post #12 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-01-2019, 11:20 PM
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It would be helpful to have at least the model of the case, or better some photos. I would incline that the led is dead, but checking that would require some soldering skills. On the other hand why do you need so badly to have the pwr LED working? I shut mine down a long time ago, there is the monitor and the case RGB lighting to give me a hint on the power state of the PC.
Best option you have is to search for a replacement assembly of LED+connector and replace it completely.

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post #13 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-01-2019, 11:39 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote: Originally Posted by azeures View Post
It would be helpful to have at least the model of the case, or better some photos. I would incline that the led is dead, but checking that would require some soldering skills. On the other hand why do you need so badly to have the pwr LED working? I shut mine down a long time ago, there is the monitor and the case RGB lighting to give me a hint on the power state of the PC.
Best option you have is to search for a replacement assembly of LED+connector and replace it completely.

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very doubtful the case model would help - got it back when I was in France & it's a purely "local" brand (the case itself got good reviews but of course all available reviews were in french)

anyway model is LDLC QT01


you're right the pwr led ain't important (and much less than the hdd led) so this is a "least priority" thread if you will - but I like to have everything working 100% if only for the sake of it ^^

plus I'm still curious & somewhat bothered as to what the hell could cause something as basic as a case led to go KO - I mean these things don't normally happen do they??


edit> I'm tempted to remove the tiny black plastic sheaths on the case's 2 PLED connectors so I can use a 1.5V AAA battery to try power the led but in case the led is intact I dunno if this could fry it
as I said I've no idea what the mobo voltage is on the PLED (and HDDLED) pins

Last edited by pulverizor; 02-01-2019 at 11:44 PM.
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post #14 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-01-2019, 11:57 PM
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Quote: Originally Posted by pulverizor View Post
very doubtful the case model would help - got it back when I was in France & it's a purely "local" brand (the case itself got good reviews but of course all available reviews were in french)



anyway model is LDLC QT01





you're right the pwr led ain't important (and much less than the hdd led) so this is a "least priority" thread if you will - but I like to have everything working 100% if only for the sake of it ^^



plus I'm still curious & somewhat bothered as to what the hell could cause something as basic as a case led to go KO - I mean these things don't normally happen do they??





edit> I'm tempted to remove the tiny black plastic sheaths on the case's 2 PLED connectors so I can use a 1.5V AAA battery to try power the led but in case the led is intact I dunno if this could fry it

as I said I've no idea what the mobo voltage is on the PLED (and HDDLED) pins
From what I see you should be able to easily pull out the plastic grid with the front panel itself. It is being clipped to the case by 6 or 8 plastic pins (like these http://prntscr.com/mfkopc ). That should give you easy access to the front panel. But before doing that make sure you have nice soldering skills and will be able to replace that burned LED.
And thou the LEDs are indeed pretty resistant, they do break from time to time, and taking into account this is done in Uncle Leao's basement somewhere, it's not something unexpected.

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post #15 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 06:25 AM
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If you have a power supply, then that'll work. But, you can use a straight battery to an LED and be fine most of the time as long as you know how much current the battery is putting through it. For instance, I have a 3v smd led I soldered leads onto to make a simple flea-plate. I used a 3v computer battery which left the light running for close to a week or so if I recall correctly.

The minimum current, before the led shuts off is something like 2v or 1.9v at which point it barely emits anything, but at 2.0 or 2.1 it still works. The led burns out at over 3.5v - I haven't actually reached the voltage to burn it out yet because they usually pop because of the heat, pressure, delamination, etc..

Most batteries have more voltage output than what is on the label... 9v batteries, for instance, typically output 9.6v to 10+v when measured. This drops as the energy levels drop. Also with DC you're fine in a range, however for consumer electronics I'd probably only use a power supply rated for the appropriate voltage, or, for short term, one which is a few percent off.

Some leds have a smaller range than ~1.5v....




Now, for your case led... Get a multimeter and find out what voltage the motherboard is trying to output - all of them should be standardized because they can go in any number of cases - it'll probably be 3v, without looking up anything... But it may not be - I don't know the exact rating of case leds but I could test it.

You could also look up the rating from your motherboard manual - they sometimes have the voltage outputs - use that to test the led ( since single-use batteries output more, you could use rechargeable batteries which puts out less to be more at that limit )... IF you're unsure, make quick connections and wear eye protection although for them to pop it usually requires a little build-up and a lot of them will burn out before they can pop, but not all.

Anyway, then put some batteries together and make a quick connection. Although, if your case led is burned out, you may want to remove it and inspect it visually - if you see a dark spot or it doesn't look normal, and it should be pretty obvious if it is burned out in most cases, then replace it.

Last edited by Acecool; 02-04-2019 at 06:29 AM.
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post #16 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-07-2019, 07:03 AM
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LED's do fail sometimes. I had the power led on my case fail. It was a 3mm blue. I replaced both power and hdd with 3mm reds(I prefer the red leds because they are less distracting/blinding).

A 1.5 volt battery is not likely to kill any led. It will generally not light up blue/white or some of the other led colors based on blue leds.

LED's drop a certain amount of voltage at a given current(a forward voltage is what they call it). If you push too much current though an LED it can be damaged. This is why a resistor(a cheap easy way to deal with this problem) is used to drop the extra voltage at the desired current for the led. If you have 5 volts and want to run a blue led at 10mA(about 3 volts at this current) you would have to drop 2 volts at 10mA. You would need volts/current in amps or 2/0.01 to get the required resistor value. In this case it would be 200ohms.

An example of various leds forward voltage with a fixed current source. They will light at lower voltages, but not all will light at lets say 1.5 volts.


None of this is required for a computer because they already dealt with any current limiting requirements. It may even be a constant current source.

If the other led works on the header for the bad one. chances are the led is bad. They are generally easy enough to replace, but some cases are easier than others.

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