[vice] Scientists Are 99% Sure They Just Detected a Black Hole Eating a Neutron Star - Overclock.net - An Overclocking Community

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[vice] Scientists Are 99% Sure They Just Detected a Black Hole Eating a Neutron Star

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post #1 of 42 (permalink) Old 08-19-2019, 08:43 PM - Thread Starter
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[vice] Scientists Are 99% Sure They Just Detected a Black Hole Eating a Neutron Star

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Concept art of a gravitational wave. Image: songsnoire

Black holes, neutron stars, and gravitational waves are deeply weird phenomena. Now, scientists are hyped about a new discovery that may involve all three.
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On Wednesday, a gravitational wave called S190814bv was detected by the US-based Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and its Italian counterpart Virgo. Based on its known properties, scientists think there is a 99% probability that the source of the wave is a black hole that ate a neutron star.
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If the team were to pick up light from the event within the coming weeks, they would be witnessing the fallout of a black hole spilling a neutron star’s guts while devouring it. This would provide a rare glimpse of the exotic properties of these extreme astronomical objects and could shed light on everything from subatomic physics to the expansion rate of the universe.

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Remember the golden rule of statistics: A personal sample size of one is a sufficient basis upon which to draw universal conclusions.
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post #2 of 42 (permalink) Old 08-20-2019, 03:55 AM
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Stuffs scary, or interesting. Depending on how you look at it.

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post #3 of 42 (permalink) Old 08-20-2019, 04:34 AM
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Super interesting. Definitely curious to see what new insight can be gained from this.

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post #4 of 42 (permalink) Old 08-20-2019, 04:38 AM
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is it dangerus
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post #5 of 42 (permalink) Old 08-20-2019, 04:48 AM
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Quote: Originally Posted by catsmoke View Post
is it dangerus
No, it's thousands of light years away at the center of our galaxy. Nothing that happens that far away will ever effect us. Something would have to be pretty local in astronomical terms to ever affect earth.

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post #6 of 42 (permalink) Old 08-20-2019, 04:57 AM
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Quote: Originally Posted by UltraMega View Post
Nothing that happens that far away will ever effect us.
depends when happen dont it

im am kiding

thx you very much
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post #7 of 42 (permalink) Old 08-20-2019, 05:13 AM
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Quote: Originally Posted by catsmoke View Post
depends when happen dont it

im am kiding

thx you very much
I'll respond even though you are kidding. If it was X amount of light years away, it also happened X amount of years ago.

and for those who don't follow this like a hobby as I do.. here is the TL,DR:

Neutron stars are essentially very dense dying stars that are just too dense to die. Normally a star dies because it runs out of the energy it need for its mass to not implode in on itself. Usually when it implodes, there is a lot of material ejected and something that remains as a dense core or smaller star. Think of a star almost like a dense burning cloud that, when it runs out of fuel, that cloud implodes on itself and get very dense. Depending on how much mass the star has a few things will happen;

(Keep in mind that the more massive a star, the more energy it has and therefore larger stars burn out and die much faster than smaller stars.)

it will become a white dwarf - this is most common and happens to stars like our sun, which are the most common type of star. White dwarfs are small and take a very long time to burn out completely. Per the age of the universe as we know it, no white dwarfs could have possibly burned out yet.

it will become a nova/supernova - larger stars have enough mass to explode and form gas clouds that smaller stars like ours can form in. These are usually know as nebulas. A smaller star of varying size will be left as the core remains of the super nova. The "crab shell nebula" is a good example of this as you can clearly see the smaller star/star core that still exists in the center of the nebula.

It will become a neutron star - these are star that are so dense that even when they run out of fuel, they have enough mass to compress the atoms in its core so much that protons and neutrons are compressed into the same space and physics get pretty weird. Neuron stars are in a place where we know a bit about how the physics start to break down before it becomes a black hole and we can't know anything about it beyond it's gravitational effects on other stars, so they are pretty interesting to astrophysicists.

It will become a black hole - this happens when a star is so massive that, without the energy needed to keep it in a active and less dense form, it collapses in on itself so much that it forms a gravity well that curves space infinitely, meaning light curves into it so no information from within can ever escape.

Neutron stars are very dense and they emit bright light at their poles. They also rotate very fast so we tend to find neutron stars when their poles point at us because we can see the pulsing light as a repeating flicker and we call these pulsars. Essentially, pulsars are neutron stars that we can see because they happen to point in the right direction.

Seeing one of these torn apart in a black hole could allow astrophysicists to gain insight into the makings of a neutron star, where physics gets very weird, if they can observe the light spectrum from it. From there they can determine what elements are present among other thing.

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post #8 of 42 (permalink) Old 08-20-2019, 07:07 AM
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Quote: Originally Posted by UltraMega View Post
Seeing one of these torn apart in a black hole could allow astrophysicists to gain insight into the makings of a neutron star, where physics gets very weird, if they can observe the light spectrum from it. From there they can determine what elements are present among other thing.
A few things to add. Firstly, there's no compositional information that can be gained from gravitational waves. Only mass and the dynamics of the event: orbital periods, timing, that sort of thing.

Second, there aren't any elements in a neutron star anymore. That's the point: there are no longer distinct protons and electrons, they have been forced to merge together by gravity and are now just neutrons, an object a few miles across with the density of an atomic nucleus.
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post #9 of 42 (permalink) Old 08-20-2019, 07:29 AM
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Quote: Originally Posted by UltraMega View Post
I'll respond even though you are kidding. If it was X amount of light years away, it also happened X amount of years ago.

and for those who don't follow this like a hobby as I do.. here is the TL,DR:

Neutron stars are essentially very dense dying stars that are just too dense to die. Normally a star dies because it runs out of the energy it need for its mass to not implode in on itself. Usually when it implodes, there is a lot of material ejected and something that remains as a dense core or smaller star. Think of a star almost like a dense burning cloud that, when it runs out of fuel, that cloud implodes on itself and get very dense. Depending on how much mass the star has a few things will happen;

(Keep in mind that the more massive a star, the more energy it has and therefore larger stars burn out and die much faster than smaller stars.)

it will become a white dwarf - this is most common and happens to stars like our sun, which are the most common type of star. White dwarfs are small and take a very long time to burn out completely. Per the age of the universe as we know it, no white dwarfs could have possibly burned out yet.

it will become a nova/supernova - larger stars have enough mass to explode and form gas clouds that smaller stars like ours can form in. These are usually know as nebulas. A smaller star of varying size will be left as the core remains of the super nova. The "crab shell nebula" is a good example of this as you can clearly see the smaller star/star core that still exists in the center of the nebula.

It will become a neutron star - these are star that are so dense that even when they run out of fuel, they have enough mass to compress the atoms in its core so much that protons and neutrons are compressed into the same space and physics get pretty weird. Neuron stars are in a place where we know a bit about how the physics start to break down before it becomes a black hole and we can't know anything about it beyond it's gravitational effects on other stars, so they are pretty interesting to astrophysicists.

It will become a black hole - this happens when a star is so massive that, without the energy needed to keep it in a active and less dense form, it collapses in on itself so much that it forms a gravity well that curves space infinitely, meaning light curves into it so no information from within can ever escape.

Neutron stars are very dense and they emit bright light at their poles. They also rotate very fast so we tend to find neutron stars when their poles point at us because we can see the pulsing light as a repeating flicker and we call these pulsars. Essentially, pulsars are neutron stars that we can see because they happen to point in the right direction.

Seeing one of these torn apart in a black hole could allow astrophysicists to gain insight into the makings of a neutron star, where physics gets very weird, if they can observe the light spectrum from it. From there they can determine what elements are present among other thing.

Are you sure you know what TL;DR stands for?


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post #10 of 42 (permalink) Old 08-20-2019, 09:27 AM
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Quote: Originally Posted by DNMock View Post
Are you sure you know what TL;DR stands for?
I'm pretty sure he knows what "too little; detail resourcefully" means.

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