[Phys.org]'Poor man's qubit' can solve quantum problems without going quantum - Overclock.net - An Overclocking Community

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[Phys.org]'Poor man's qubit' can solve quantum problems without going quantum

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post #1 of 14 (permalink) Old 09-18-2019, 01:27 PM - Thread Starter
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[Phys.org]'Poor man's qubit' can solve quantum problems without going quantum

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University in Japan have built the first hardware to demonstrate how the fundamental units of what would be a probabilistic computer—called p-bits—are capable of performing a calculation that quantum computers would usually be called upon to perform.

The study, published in Nature on Wednesday (Sept. 18), introduces a device that serves as a basis for building probabilistic computers to more efficiently solve problems in areas such as drug research, encryption and cybersecurity, financial services, data analysis and supply chain logistics.

Today's computers store and use information in the form of zeroes and ones called bits. Quantum computers use qubits that can be both zero and one at the same time. In 2017, a Purdue research group led by Supriyo Datta, the university's Thomas Duncan Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, proposed the idea of a probabilistic computer using p-bits that can be either zero or one at any given time and fluctuate rapidly between the two.
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post #2 of 14 (permalink) Old 09-18-2019, 02:14 PM
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Tohoku University researchers William Borders, Shusuke Fukami and Hideo Ohno altered an MRAM device, making it intentionally unstable to better facilitate the ability of p-bits to fluctuate. Purdue researchers combined this device with a transistor to build a three-terminal unit whose fluctuations could be controlled. Eight such p-bit units were interconnected to build a probabilistic computer.
Neat. Sounds like they are shrinking down computing abilities and reducing the number of components needed for I/O operations. Might be a useful development, we'll see how things play out.

Also my 1337'th post.


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post #3 of 14 (permalink) Old 09-18-2019, 03:43 PM
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It's my understanding that any computer can do quantum calculation, just not as efficiently.

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post #4 of 14 (permalink) Old 09-19-2019, 05:02 PM
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I've made tons of these, undervolting's a Btch.

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post #5 of 14 (permalink) Old 09-19-2019, 06:29 PM
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I got a little concerned when I saw integer factorization in there, and if they can put a 1024 pbits on silicon then I'm going to get a lot more concerned for anything not using ECDSA or newer encryption.

Quote: Originally Posted by speed_demon View Post
Spoiler!
Congrats, but... what?

They took MRAM and destabilized it to make it toggle with high frequency, this really doesn't have anything to do with I/O, and they didn't do any shrinking.

Quote: Originally Posted by UltraMega View Post
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Yea, but Turing complete isn't exactly a high bar, nor all that useful when its solvable only with infinite time.


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post #6 of 14 (permalink) Old 09-19-2019, 06:33 PM
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"On a chip, this circuit would take up the same area as a transistor, but perform a function that would have taken thousands of transistors to perform.
Sounds like a reduction in area to me, performing a function using far fewer components.


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post #7 of 14 (permalink) Old 09-20-2019, 12:56 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote: Originally Posted by Avonosac View Post
I got a little concerned when I saw integer factorization in there, and if they can put a 1024 pbits on silicon then I'm going to get a lot more concerned for anything not using ECDSA or newer encryption.


Congrats, but... what?

They took MRAM and destabilized it to make it toggle with high frequency, this really doesn't have anything to do with I/O, and they didn't do any shrinking.



Yea, but Turing complete isn't exactly a high bar, nor all that useful when its solvable only with infinite time.
I wonder compared to a 64bit binary processor does it still have 2**64 or does it have 3**64?
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post #8 of 14 (permalink) Old 09-22-2019, 09:37 AM
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Quote: Originally Posted by speed_demon View Post
Spoiler!
If that is what they did, they might have reduced something. So far all they have done is taken something else which is MUCH bigger to prove out the concept, and made a relative comparison to the potential size savings of this approach once optimized.

Quote: Originally Posted by PontiacGTX View Post
Spoiler!
Are you talking about address space? This doesn't increase the address space of binary, nor make it ternary. If this truly becomes feasible, what this does is effectively simulate the non-deterministic benefits of superposition allowing the bits to effectively be 0 AND 1 in integer arithmetic calculations. *hand wavey explanation*


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post #9 of 14 (permalink) Old 09-22-2019, 02:15 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote: Originally Posted by Avonosac View Post
If that is what they did, they might have reduced something. So far all they have done is taken something else which is MUCH bigger to prove out the concept, and made a relative comparison to the potential size savings of this approach once optimized.



Are you talking about address space? This doesn't increase the address space of binary, nor make it ternary. If this truly becomes feasible, what this does is effectively simulate the non-deterministic benefits of superposition allowing the bits to effectively be 0 AND 1 in integer arithmetic calculations. *hand wavey explanation*
I was wondering if it made it ternary, but that answers my doubt
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post #10 of 14 (permalink) Old 09-23-2019, 03:17 PM
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Quote: Originally Posted by Avonosac View Post
I got a little concerned when I saw integer factorization in there, and if they can put a 1024 pbits on silicon then I'm going to get a lot more concerned for anything not using ECDSA or newer encryption.


Congrats, but... what?

They took MRAM and destabilized it to make it toggle with high frequency, this really doesn't have anything to do with I/O, and they didn't do any shrinking.



Yea, but Turing complete isn't exactly a high bar, nor all that useful when its solvable only with infinite time.
Quantum will never be a threat to binary computers in the same way that babies can't assemble turbojet engines. Right now all quantum computers have to have their inputs come from highly precise analog signal generators and unless you have terrabit range datasets to run through them they're not worth the time. Each new problem requires a new processor design and you can't make just one because the ONLY error correction you have is to build 3 of them and make sure they all do the problem and give the same answer. You also have to listen to that answer with high speed very precise analog systems.

And the input and output are generated by run-of-the-mill scientific binary systems anyway. Right now the only thing Qputers can do is floating point, they cannot integer faster than someone with two buckets and some pebbles. The chilling requirement for higher loads and all the problems with harmonics and even ambient noise changing the answer (precisely why we DIDN'T make analog computers in the beginning) make their use niche no matter what.

Sure, at some point they may be able to calculate FTL... but they're not gonna be useful to figure out my 7 letter password encryption. Qputers are so-overhyped that both Keller and Koduri will look at you like you said Nicola Tesla was an Alien if you even try to get them to talk about it.
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