[E-ScrapNews] Right-to-repair advocates make their case in one statehouse - Page 3 - Overclock.net - An Overclocking Community
Forum Jump: 

[E-ScrapNews] Right-to-repair advocates make their case in one statehouse

Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #21 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-03-2020, 05:54 PM
LTSC Consiglieri
 
skupples's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Fort Lauderdale
Posts: 22,407
Rep: 653 (Unique: 349)
Quote: Originally Posted by speed_demon View Post
The best way around it is to avoid General Motors products, John Deere products, and apparently now Cisco. That's tough as Cisco equipment is basically everywhere.

Yeah if you FUBAR something while working on it, it's on you. Not on the company.

My BIL worked for Cisco for at least the last decade - Next time I see him I'll ask his thoughts on the issue. Maybe he knows something we don't.
on the consumer level -

there's always a risk the end user will end up hurting themselves if they LEAVE IT PLUGGED IN WHILE WORKING ON IT.

otherwise, the only risk is damaging the device bad enough to have to go BUY A NEW ONE ANYWAYS.

risk of "local data loss" isn't on the corporation once you crack the case, but I can 100% see little timmy's mom Karen trying to sue FOR ALL THE TEA IN CHINA after timmy gets zapped from sticking a screw driver into a running power supply.

--- more seriously though.

I've been trying to hold onto my relics. I willingly grabbed a 2009 civic when my 06 CTS died in 2017, and I'm still rocking an iPhone 6S+, post bend gate revision now. Pretty sure my warranty is finally out though

R.I.P. Zawarudo, may you OC angels' wings in heaven.
If something appears too good to be true, it probably is.
Best R0ach Quote of all time : TLDR: Haswell might be the last legit gaming platform unless mice get their own non-USB interface on some newer architecture.
skupples is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #22 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-04-2020, 07:46 AM
New to Overclock.net
 
Mrzev's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Texas
Posts: 2,312
Rep: 97 (Unique: 77)
Quote: Originally Posted by Shawnb99 View Post
COMPTIA certs have always been useless and a waste of money.
IMO, all certs and degrees are pretty much useless. It gets you past auto filters, but i have seen people with certs and degrees that know nothing. IMO, any cert you can take a 1 week bootcamp and pass , has no value. My coworker got his CCNA in 1 week. From knowing nothing about networking to having a CCNA. We were also talking about our Sr Projects in college, he was a EE and he basically made a whole crane game. Sensors, controls, motors, the whole 9 yards. The other EE in the conversation said he got to work as a group and get a sensor working, basically 1/5th of the other guys project and he did it as a group. He then proceeded to mention that his school almost lost the accreditation shortly after he graduated. You can make a valuable cert, but people are always going to train to pass a test.



Mrzev is offline  
post #23 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-04-2020, 09:23 AM
New to Overclock.net
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 301
Rep: 13 (Unique: 12)
Quote: Originally Posted by Mrzev View Post
IMO, all certs and degrees are pretty much useless. It gets you past auto filters, but i have seen people with certs and degrees that know nothing. IMO, any cert you can take a 1 week bootcamp and pass , has no value. My coworker got his CCNA in 1 week. From knowing nothing about networking to having a CCNA. We were also talking about our Sr Projects in college, he was a EE and he basically made a whole crane game. Sensors, controls, motors, the whole 9 yards. The other EE in the conversation said he got to work as a group and get a sensor working, basically 1/5th of the other guys project and he did it as a group. He then proceeded to mention that his school almost lost the accreditation shortly after he graduated. You can make a valuable cert, but people are always going to train to pass a test.

Being a non-traditional student (I'm 48) currently in collage (just came in from class) I can tell you they don't teach much that's useful day to day in the real world of work. They give some basics but fall short on encouraging critical thinking skills. And let me tell you the "Professors" don't like it when you know more about the subject they are teaching than they do, or you give them real world examples of why the theory they are pushing isn't applicable in ALL situations or is woefully incorrect or limited to one professional segment.

Open Air Build
(13 items)
CPU
i9
Motherboard
ASUS ROG Strix Z390-H Gaming
GPU
MSI GEFORCE GTX1080 TI GAMING X 11G
RAM
Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 DRAM 3000MHz
Hard Drive
Samsung 970 EVO
Hard Drive
WD Blue
Power Supply
EVGA SuperNOVA
Cooling
All PrimoChill parts (Rad 360, Pumps D5, Fittings, and Acrylic Tubing), Byskey CPU&GPU Blocks
Case
Praxis Wet Bench
Operating System
Windows 10 Pro
Monitor
Asus Predrator
Other
Thermaltake Commander F6 Fan Controller
Other
DIY Sleeved Cables
▲ hide details ▲
smilinjohn is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #24 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-04-2020, 10:52 AM
New to Overclock.net
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Location: OKC
Posts: 18
Rep: 3 (Unique: 3)
Quote: Originally Posted by smilinjohn View Post
Being a non-traditional student (I'm 48) currently in collage (just came in from class) I can tell you they don't teach much that's useful day to day in the real world of work. They give some basics but fall short on encouraging critical thinking skills. And let me tell you the "Professors" don't like it when you know more about the subject they are teaching than they do, or you give them real world examples of why the theory they are pushing isn't applicable in ALL situations or is woefully incorrect or limited to one professional segment.
I have to say teachers in general don't like to have a student who knows more than they do. I learned that very early on. High school had a required "intro to microcomputing" which was basically Microsoft works in DOS. I had been dealing with DOS for a few years and learned by reading the commands in the manual. On top of that I had been using a newer version of works and putting out form letters for over a year along with keeping a fairly large spreadsheet for one of my extracurricular activities. The teacher was going through things in class and got to a part and malformed the formula, I tried to point it out discretely and they just said to follow along. I didn't because I knew the formula by heart but the rest of the class drones didn't have a clue and followed blindly. A few minutes later when everything was supposed to be right the teacher walked around looking it over and complaining that everyone had gotten it wrong and she didn't understand how so many people had done so till she got to my screen. I then publicly informed her that she had screwed it up and I didn't follow her directions, she was NOT happy to say the least. My senior year ended up being college level classes in the morning and then one class in the afternoon at the actual school I graduated from and even though DOS was basically dead that was one of the classes I took just so I had the credits and proof I understood everything. After that year I basically figured out it only mattered on paper.

A couple years later one of the other teachers in that section who worked with her ended up at one of the Microsoft "Big Day" things where they talked about windows 2000 server and active directory and all that stuff. It was kinda odd because I was the only person there who knew what DLL stood for. All the professionals didn't have a clue even though they worked in the field and I was pretty much self taught at that point.
NightShade00013 is offline  
post #25 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-04-2020, 11:31 AM
New to Overclock.net
 
Mrzev's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Texas
Posts: 2,312
Rep: 97 (Unique: 77)
I have had good luck with teachers accepting knowledge from experience. When I went back to school after being a software dev for 2 years, my project management class i was able to talk to the class about my experiences. Its nice to have someone explain the issues that prevent the perfect world examples defined in the book. I also would create more interesting or challenging projects with their approval. Hey, instead of this 5 page dreamweaver website we are having to make, can i write it with ASPX? As long as it has a send email button and field validations on submit, sure.... I made it connect to my gmail account and actually send an email while the stupid dreamweaver was basically EMAIL: hyperlink that would just open outlook or whatever.

I was a bit embarrassed when i got a job and I felt like i couldn't do simple things like adding a library inside visual studio and referencing some functions. No idea no what or how to do P invokes. I emailed on of my old professors about these things, and he said they don't teach anything like that until the masters level courses. They teach a lot, but i feel they don't teach the basics of the position... and that goes with all degrees. Kinda like in highschool they teach you how to take the SAT, but they dont teach you how to do your taxes, how insurance works, how loans and credit works... stuff that as an adult you are expected to know but never taught. Degrees where you are forced to intern like my wife's Teaching degree, she basically had 1 year of teaching, that really does help.



Mrzev is offline  
post #26 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-13-2020, 12:09 PM
New to Overclock.net
 
1Kaz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 303
Rep: 11 (Unique: 11)
There's two sides of this. Apple wants to make more money, and planes need an annual inspection by a certified aircraft mechanic. I am absolutely against anti-consumer behavior that is designed to sell new units. Non-standard screws, along with soldering ram into devices is generally why I'm anti-Apple. I feel they are anti-consumer. But, the reason most aviation laws exist, is because someone died. John Deer probably cares more about their bottom line, but at a certain point, it's a fair question, if something can be dangerous should people be allowed to work on it? At what point do they need special training and who controls that checkpoint? The BAR associations says hi too....

Some things are just a racket, but some things are not...
1Kaz is offline  
post #27 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-13-2020, 01:28 PM
LTSC Consiglieri
 
skupples's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Fort Lauderdale
Posts: 22,407
Rep: 653 (Unique: 349)
Quote: Originally Posted by 1Kaz View Post
There's two sides of this. Apple wants to make more money, and planes need an annual inspection by a certified aircraft mechanic. I am absolutely against anti-consumer behavior that is designed to sell new units. Non-standard screws, along with soldering ram into devices is generally why I'm anti-Apple. I feel they are anti-consumer. But, the reason most aviation laws exist, is because someone died. John Deer probably cares more about their bottom line, but at a certain point, it's a fair question, if something can be dangerous should people be allowed to work on it? At what point do they need special training and who controls that checkpoint? The BAR associations says hi too....

Some things are just a racket, but some things are not...
at the point that its an issue for anyone but self that you're tinkering.

oh i'm sure Mr. Lawyer would then argue risk reduction. john deere isn't worried about anyone getting hurt. they're worried about someone getting hurt, then suing over it.

these corporations flat out could give 2 farks about the security of your data, and your own physical safety.

they care about getting sued, and making money. period. it's no more, no less. reduce sue risk, increase profit, get bentleys.

R.I.P. Zawarudo, may you OC angels' wings in heaven.
If something appears too good to be true, it probably is.
Best R0ach Quote of all time : TLDR: Haswell might be the last legit gaming platform unless mice get their own non-USB interface on some newer architecture.
skupples is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Overclock.net - An Overclocking Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off