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Does my NVME support Trim - Do i need to use it?

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post #1 of 19 (permalink) Old 10-23-2019, 03:55 AM - Thread Starter
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Does my NVME support Trim - Do i need to use it?

Just got a brand new Adata SX8200 Pro and on crystal disk info it just lists S.M.A.R.T. under features i dont see trim to be reported there. How do i know if it supports it and if its enabled. Also do i need to run it manually and how often do i need to do so

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post #2 of 19 (permalink) Old 10-23-2019, 04:41 AM
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post #3 of 19 (permalink) Old 10-23-2019, 04:47 AM - Thread Starter
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I had already read the article, it isnt saying much.

DisableDeleteNotify checks if trim is supported and enabled in the OS, not the drive necessarily.

As for the windows optimize feature, can we really trust windows to tell if drive is optimised or not? IS there a btter way to tell, or some flag to check via the smart sensors?

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post #4 of 19 (permalink) Old 10-23-2019, 04:48 AM
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The drive supports TRIM. You are way overthinking this and looking for problems that aren't there.

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post #5 of 19 (permalink) Old 10-23-2019, 04:51 AM - Thread Starter
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I just want to educate myself. Too frequent usage of trim means blocks are re-written and drive drops its lifetime, too absent means your speeds get worse overtime

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post #6 of 19 (permalink) Old 10-23-2019, 04:58 AM
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Quote: Originally Posted by therock003 View Post
I just want to educate myself. Too frequent usage of trim means blocks are re-written and drive drops its lifetime, too absent means your speeds get worse overtime

You misunderstood things. It's exactly reversed:

(1) You can't do too much TRIM. Doing TRIM is just sending information to the drive's controller. The more information the controller has about which parts of the drive are free, the better job it can do with its garbage collection work.

(2) The speed getting worse without TRIM is because the drive is rewriting blocks. The rewriting is what's causing the speed to drop.
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post #7 of 19 (permalink) Old 10-23-2019, 05:04 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote: Originally Posted by deepor View Post
You misunderstood things. It's exactly reversed:

(1) You can't do too much TRIM. Doing TRIM is just sending information to the drive's controller. The more information the controller has about which parts of the drive are free, the better job it can do with its garbage collection work.

(2) The speed getting worse without TRIM is because the drive is rewriting blocks. The rewriting is what's causing the speed to drop.
No this is exactly what im saying. But because trim is 0-filling a block, that block it adds a write cycle so its getting closer to its maximum lifetime. Too much trimming means more wear and tear

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post #8 of 19 (permalink) Old 10-23-2019, 05:17 AM
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Quote: Originally Posted by therock003 View Post
No this is exactly what im saying. But because trim is 0-filling a block, that block it adds a write cycle so its getting closer to its maximum lifetime. Too much trimming means more wear and tear
http://www.thessdreview.com/daily-ne...an-ssd-primer/

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post #9 of 19 (permalink) Old 10-23-2019, 05:30 AM
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Quote: Originally Posted by therock003 View Post
No this is exactly what im saying. But because trim is 0-filling a block, that block it adds a write cycle so its getting closer to its maximum lifetime. Too much trimming means more wear and tear
TRIM isn't really zero-filling a block. TRIM only means that information was sent to the SSD controller about what's not in use anymore by the PC. The SSD controller will not immediately wipe the block. It will at first only make a note that the block is not supposed to be in use anymore. The controller will then answer with zeroes when the PC asks about the data in the block. But those zeroes does not mean that the data on the real drive was actually wiped.

The controller can't immediately wipe a block. This is because in the NAND chips of the drive, you can only wipe a very large area at once. You cannot wipe just a single block because the wipe operation of the NAND chips also destroys many neighboring blocks as well. The controller waits with the actual wiping as long as it can. The PC might mark some of the neighboring blocks with TRIM and then the wipe operation has more worth.

To be concrete, the PC sees sectors of 512 bytes size on the drive. Those 512 bytes are the block size that is used in the TRIM command. In the real NAND chips, the "block erasure size" is much larger, it is for example 4MB. In this example, that would be 8192 blocks of 512 bytes size that will be wiped at once.
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post #10 of 19 (permalink) Old 10-23-2019, 08:51 AM - Thread Starter
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Thank you guys, these last couple of answers were actually helpful. So should i just add a weekly task so that windows perform an automatic optimizing? Whats the best method of approach to keep the drive relatively fresh

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