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Can 'basic' mouse software be adjusted?

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post #1 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-05-2019, 09:56 PM - Thread Starter
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Can 'basic' mouse software be adjusted?

If you stopped by, you're probably somewhat curious. I couldn't really word my question well as it's difficult to explain in less than ten words right now.

I really like mice with multiple side buttons that have a good shape/weight to them. This means that almost all MMO-Mice are a no-go due to their weight, size, and addition of things I find annoying such as thumb/ring finger rests. It also means that mice that are similar to the G502 (G602, G402, Basilisk, etc) are also a no-go. That pretty much sums up the vast majority of mice with 3+ side buttons.

I recently got my hands on a relatively obscure mouse called the Skydigital Mechanic GO90. However, when I installed the software from their website and got to customizing, I realized that the very front side button is greyed out, meaning it can't be customized to use for anything other than DPI Shift. This pretty much kills the mouse for me. The only reason I bought it was due to the third button and using it for binding abilities.

Here's my question: Is it possible to adjust the '6' button so that instead of only functioning as Switch Mode, it can actually be rebound to a key or a function like M4/M5?

I'm thinking there's two possibilities: Either through the software or through the hardware. I've used other obscure mice that use the exact same type of software as it seems to be common for these knockoff companies. Is there a way to access the software and change anything in there?

If it's hardware related, what would be the process? Would it require doing something to do with the switch/PCB? Is it even possible to do that?

Lastly, if I can get ahold of the company to ask them, is it possible that they can release a patch/updated version of the software so that it allows the button to be customizable? Or can the mouse never be changed again? It's a korean company, and as far as I'm concerned, they don't really bother with the U.S. market, but I'd still try.
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post #2 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-05-2019, 10:56 PM
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If the firmware of the mouse can be updated, it's technically possible, but very difficult without the cooperation of the manufacturer. Without their cooperation, you'd have to write your own firmware for the microcontroller, or find a firmware stack that's close to what you need, and modify it so it knows which pins are connected to which switches. Then you might need an external programmer to get the firmware onto the microcontroller.

Alternatively, you could take something like a teensy, and bodge it in to replace the existing microcontroller, at least for that switch, That would be easier on the software side, but more difficult on the hardware side.

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post #3 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-06-2019, 02:20 AM
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Many modern operating systems have software that emulates a button when two are pressed. I think the easiest way to do this is to hack the mouse so that when it presses the button, when forward and back are pressed together. Then you could make a script in autohotkey to trigger a keyboard press. I would use two optoisolators in parallel, one wired to front the other to back button. Then feed the optoisolator trigger dc through a 1 k resistor and hook the other end to the third button.
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post #4 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-06-2019, 02:36 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote: Originally Posted by gipetto View Post
Many modern operating systems have software that emulates a button when two are pressed. I think the easiest way to do this is to hack the mouse so that when it presses the button, when forward and back are pressed together. Then you could make a script in autohotkey to trigger a keyboard press. I would use two optoisolators in parallel, one wired to front the other to back button. Then feed the optoisolator trigger dc through a 1 k resistor and hook the other end to the third button.
I'll have to figure out what that even is, but what is the feasibility of it staying in place inside once set? I'm flinging this mouse around at pretty fast speeds, picking it up, slamming it down (not hard). Would it come loose in that process?
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post #5 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-06-2019, 02:39 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote: Originally Posted by TranquilTempest View Post
If the firmware of the mouse can be updated, it's technically possible, but very difficult without the cooperation of the manufacturer. Without their cooperation, you'd have to write your own firmware for the microcontroller, or find a firmware stack that's close to what you need, and modify it so it knows which pins are connected to which switches. Then you might need an external programmer to get the firmware onto the microcontroller.

Alternatively, you could take something like a teensy, and bodge it in to replace the existing microcontroller, at least for that switch, That would be easier on the software side, but more difficult on the hardware side.
By firmware, do you mean the application that I linked a screenshot of in my original post? Or is the firmware something that's directly on the mouse?

Also, what's a teensy?
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post #6 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-06-2019, 02:53 AM
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No, If you are worried you could secure it with hot glue. btw, the optoisolator might not work as there could be leakage current through the phototransistor fooling the mouse in to thinking it is on. I think it might work though as I played around with one and a mouse pcb before. I used a 4 pin DIP version, cant remember the model but aliexpress has PC817C which could work. maybe there is a dual version you could search for. I got the resister value wrong, here is a circuit you can use, just duplicate it for each button. the transistor is not needed for this purpose, and remember the led side goes to one switch, the switched side goes to the other two switches.

https://zhutarduino.wordpress.com/ar...-optocouplers/
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post #7 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-06-2019, 03:11 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote: Originally Posted by gipetto View Post
No, If you are worried you could secure it with hot glue. btw, the optoisolator might not work as there could be leakage current through the phototransistor fooling the mouse in to thinking it is on. I think it might work though as I played around with one and a mouse pcb before. I used a 4 pin DIP version, cant remember the model but aliexpress has PC817C which could work. maybe there is a dual version you could search for. I got the resister value wrong, here is a circuit you can use, just duplicate it for each button. the transistor is not needed for this purpose, and remember the led side goes to one switch, the switched side goes to the other two switches.

https://zhutarduino.wordpress.com/ar...-optocouplers/
These are all things I have about 0 idea of so it's literally rocket science to me, but your original explanation was very good in getting the idea through. Let's say, using the PC817C (which I assume is a 4 pin DIP) is the octocoupler and one side would have the Fwd/Back buttons on a connector each while the third side button would go to a connector on the opposite side. If it's a 4-pin, would I simply ignore the other pin on the side of the third button?

Looking at the diagram you provided, what would power the octocoupler exactly?
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post #8 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-06-2019, 07:55 AM
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I am not sure how to explain it so I made a diagram in kicad which I dont know how to use lol. you can take power for the optoisolators from the usb cable, as they are isolated from the digital pins there is no danger in backfeeding a 3.3v mcu and frying it. you will need to cut the trace on pin2 and pin3 in this pic(normally open) or the 5v will get shorted straight to ground.
I should mention that an easier mod is to paracord the mouse and run an extra wire up the cable to the switch. the other end of this can go to a teensy or arduino (<15$) that is emulating a keyboard. Then you would have two usb plugs on the same mouse, but the upside is there would be no need for software to run on the pc.
edit pin2 and pin3, really dont want to smoke the mcu.
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Last edited by gipetto; 04-06-2019 at 08:04 AM.
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post #9 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-06-2019, 06:19 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote: Originally Posted by gipetto View Post
I am not sure how to explain it so I made a diagram in kicad which I dont know how to use lol. you can take power for the optoisolators from the usb cable, as they are isolated from the digital pins there is no danger in backfeeding a 3.3v mcu and frying it. you will need to cut the trace on pin2 and pin3 in this pic(normally open) or the 5v will get shorted straight to ground.
I should mention that an easier mod is to paracord the mouse and run an extra wire up the cable to the switch. the other end of this can go to a teensy or arduino (<15$) that is emulating a keyboard. Then you would have two usb plugs on the same mouse, but the upside is there would be no need for software to run on the pc.
edit pin2 and pin3, really dont want to smoke the mcu.
That's convenient because I did paracord this mouse, so I already do have the ability to access the internals at will. That sounds a lot more feasible than messing around with optocontrollers on the inside, so I'll follow that route if their customer service is a dud.
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post #10 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-06-2019, 06:51 PM
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Essentially a Zowie EC clone.

If a button is detectable in OS then you can rebind it with any software such as AHK.
If not then a hardware mod is necessary to either rewire the buttons the way you want them or separate them and have them appear to OS as a different device. Aka the complicated expensive solutions above.
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