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What CPU VID should be

 
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post #1 of 3 (permalink) Old 02-20-2019, 04:20 AM - Thread Starter
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What CPU VID should be

Hello,
I overclocked to 4.9Ghz seems stable, but im not sure if im doing right. Put LLC at turbo above is(extreme and ultra extreme), set cpu voltage at 1.265V and this working 1.272 at idle and 1.260 at load, but what makes me nevervous is vid, because its reaches sometimes 1.35V as i understand about vid its how much voltages cpu asking from motherboard and for milesecond cpu received. Can someone tell me should i care about vid or i have to go llc on high and put cpu voltage alot more? btw im not using full cpu potential all the time i let cpu decide how many ghz he need.

Spec.
i5 9600k 3.7Ghz @ 4.9Ghz
z390 Gigabyte gaming x
Kingston DDR4 3000Mhz 2x8Gb
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Last edited by gedas646; 02-20-2019 at 01:03 PM. Reason: bad title
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post #2 of 3 (permalink) Old 02-20-2019, 04:45 PM
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VID is what the CPU is requesting from the motherboard for voltage. It is not something you set or control. It is mildly interesting to some people as an indicator of whether your CPU requests lower voltages than others, but other than that, it's not something you do anything about.

VRVout or VCore (if your motherboard doesn't have VRVout - use HWiNFO64 to see VRVout if your motherboard has it) is the voltage to look at for what is being given to your CPU and that is related to the voltage you set in the BIOS (though generally not identical).

It's hard to tell exactly what question you're asking. At a given CPU frequency, you want your CPU voltage as low as you can and still have stability, both at idle and under stress test. If your CPU voltage is set at 1.265V and goes between 1.260 and 1.272 and your system is stable under stress test, then you're perfectly fine. If your stress test temps are fine, then you don't really need to do anything else. If you wanted to reduce the core temps under stress load (such as Prime95), then you could see how much you could reduce your CPU voltage while still maintaining stability under stress load.

I'd really suggest using HWiNFO64 to see your temperatures and voltages in more detail.

FYI, a temporary 1.35V is no big deal for a modern Intel CPU and again VID is not what the CPU is getting - that's what it might be requesting. Some people run their CPUs at 1.40V though that typically requires a lot of cooling to maintain decent temps.

[email protected] (-1 AVX offset) on ASRock Z390 Taichi with Noctua NH-D15 air cooler
CPU offset voltage of -25mv, runs VRVout 1.240-1.313V on full AVX load, 1.225-1.275V on non-AVX load
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post #3 of 3 (permalink) Old 02-21-2019, 09:26 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote: Originally Posted by jfriend00 View Post
VID is what the CPU is requesting from the motherboard for voltage. It is not something you set or control. It is mildly interesting to some people as an indicator of whether your CPU requests lower voltages than others, but other than that, it's not something you do anything about.

VRVout or VCore (if your motherboard doesn't have VRVout - use HWiNFO64 to see VRVout if your motherboard has it) is the voltage to look at for what is being given to your CPU and that is related to the voltage you set in the BIOS (though generally not identical).

It's hard to tell exactly what question you're asking. At a given CPU frequency, you want your CPU voltage as low as you can and still have stability, both at idle and under stress test. If your CPU voltage is set at 1.265V and goes between 1.260 and 1.272 and your system is stable under stress test, then you're perfectly fine. If your stress test temps are fine, then you don't really need to do anything else. If you wanted to reduce the core temps under stress load (such as Prime95), then you could see how much you could reduce your CPU voltage while still maintaining stability under stress load.

I'd really suggest using HWiNFO64 to see your temperatures and voltages in more detail.

FYI, a temporary 1.35V is no big deal for a modern Intel CPU and again VID is not what the CPU is getting - that's what it might be requesting. Some people run their CPUs at 1.40V though that typically requires a lot of cooling to maintain decent temps.
Im asking is my clock "okey" im not sure about vid, because as i understand cpu voltage use it for a milesecond or im wrong?
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