Few Pump\Tubing questions, should I cancel this pump? - Overclock.net - An Overclocking Community

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Few Pump\Tubing questions, should I cancel this pump?

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post #1 of 35 (permalink) Old 09-02-2019, 12:35 AM - Thread Starter
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Few Pump\Tubing questions, should I cancel this pump?

1. The most important question I would like answered. What do you think of this pump? I ordered it a second ago, is the type of pump just weak, no pressure? I thought you take the max head with the GPM to see how much PSI the pump could achieve. But it says it's non self priming, so what the heck? I did a lot of research about 4 months ago and lost my notes about pumps\tubing.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1


2. So the barbs on my water block take 1/4'' ID tubing. Is that normal? Should I get 3/8 barbs and ID tubing instead? Does it even matter? If I remember correctly the answer is no it doesn't matter. I know tubing at some point makes no difference in size because the holes on a cpu water block are the limiting factor.


3. The push pump I have only gets to maybe .5 gpm, takes over 4 minutes to fill 2 gallons running through my waterblock. My cpu water block is a foot lower then the pump. The pump by itself without any tubing dumps water out like a champ. I'll test it but I wouldn't doubt 2-3 GPM. With this PSI calculator it doesn't seem to make sense. Images below.



Current Pump

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Current Waterblock\Barb

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1


4. Mixing metals is bad but, when you use say alum\copper\nickel what about brass\copper or steel\copper? steel\copper\brass?


5. Why would 3/8 ID affect PSI and not 1/2?


Tubing: 0.5 PSI per 10 feet for 3/8" ID, negligible for 1/2" ID.



6. The ID of a barb on a waterblock is 1/4'', is my 1/4 id tubing killing my psi? Would adding this pump as a pull pump help my PSI?







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Last edited by treetops422; 09-02-2019 at 12:52 AM.
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post #2 of 35 (permalink) Old 09-02-2019, 12:54 AM
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Hey mate, are you using these as an experiment or are you going to use those in your daily rig? if you are trying to go as cheap as possible, don't go that route, there are easier way to do it.

first thing, never, like never ever cheap out on the pump, if it fails you are pretty much in big trouble. You can buy used, or use chinese vendors like barrow or bykski, they have a lowara pump which is made by the same company "Xylem" that makes Laing pumps.

For your questions regarding copper and steel, yes there will be galvanic corrosion. pretty much you can google the galvanic corrosion between two metals and you will get the full explanation of why those two specific corrode each other or which metal is donating to the other.

There is a difference between head pressure and flow rate. the better head pressure the more your fluid will be able to push through your restrictive components, while the more flow rate will move more fluids in a nonrestrictive environment.

Diameter doesn't affect pressure, given the flow rate is the same, Q= VA so the that will affect the speed of your water not its ability to move further.

Hope that made any sense to you. have a look at formula mod, they have got some decent products.

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post #3 of 35 (permalink) Old 09-02-2019, 01:04 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote: Originally Posted by Ramzinho View Post
Hey mate, are you using these as an experiment or are you going to use those in your daily rig? if you are trying to go as cheap as possible, don't go that route, there are easier way to do it.

first thing, never, like never ever cheap out on the pump, if it fails you are pretty much in big trouble. You can buy used, or use chinese vendors like barrow or bykski, they have a lowara pump which is made by the same company "Xylem" that makes Laing pumps.

For your questions regarding copper and steel, yes there will be galvanic corrosion. pretty much you can google the galvanic corrosion between two metals and you will get the full explanation of why those two specific corrode each other or which metal is donating to the other.

There is a difference between head pressure and flow rate. the better head pressure the more your fluid will be able to push through your restrictive components, while the more flow rate will move more fluids in a nonrestrictive environment.

Diameter doesn't affect pressure, given the flow rate is the same, Q= VA so the that will affect the speed of your water not its ability to move further.

Hope that made any sense to you. have a look at formula mod, they have got some decent products.
Yeah I'm experimenting atm. But I wanted to have at least 1 gpm. I think I was just expecting to much out of this pump and I'm overthinking the rest. Do you think that pump I just bought would give me 1gpm with the push Pump I already have?



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post #4 of 35 (permalink) Old 09-02-2019, 10:45 PM
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3/8 or 10mm tube should be the smallest tube you use for several reasons. The best are in my opinion:

It closely matches the internal diameter of G1/4 fittings, which are of course the standard. Larger tube diameter does in theory allow lower restriction but because we use G1/4 fittings the loop will always have a bunch of 10mm taps setting the restriction.

Restriction caused by tube diameter increases by factors instead of linearly. Once under 10mm the restriction ramps up extremely quickly as diameter falls.
6mm (1/4") barbs you have are way more restrictive than 10mm barbs

Also: all centrifugal pumps like we use for water-cooling are non self priming. Self priming pumps are capable of moving air until water arrives from the res. A piston pump is an example of a self priming pump. They suck for flow efficiency though compared to centrifugal.

Last edited by Ashcroft; 09-02-2019 at 10:51 PM.
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post #5 of 35 (permalink) Old 09-03-2019, 04:40 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote: Originally Posted by Ashcroft View Post
3/8 or 10mm tube should be the smallest tube you use for several reasons. The best are in my opinion:

It closely matches the internal diameter of G1/4 fittings, which are of course the standard. Larger tube diameter does in theory allow lower restriction but because we use G1/4 fittings the loop will always have a bunch of 10mm taps setting the restriction.

Restriction caused by tube diameter increases by factors instead of linearly. Once under 10mm the restriction ramps up extremely quickly as diameter falls.
6mm (1/4") barbs you have are way more restrictive than 10mm barbs

Also: all centrifugal pumps like we use for water-cooling are non self priming. Self priming pumps are capable of moving air until water arrives from the res. A piston pump is an example of a self priming pump. They suck for flow efficiency though compared to centrifugal.
Makes sense. Short story: The 1/4 inch cpu block barbs that came with my block threw me off. I went with a somewhat better submersible pump. I'm going to get new tubing/fittings and do a quick comparison.



My fittings are 1/4'', which caused me to go to home depot and get some 1/4'' tubing ($7) 20 feet. I still have 10 feet of very poor 3/8'' tubing that kinks, real junk tubing I got off Amazon, $8 it's way to thin, it's not worth the hassle of sending back despite not being the item in the pic. I can still use that stuff for some testing later on. I'll end up grabbing some 3/8'' tubing and fittings via home depot, from what I've seen they really shine price and quality wise in this area, along with any adapters. So that's good to know.



If mixing steel and copper is a bad idea then why is every barb made of steel. (I'm guessing) I don't think this is an issue. Brass and copper idk. While this is not currently for a permanent system, I don't want to mix corrosive metals if I don't have too. I'm on a budget for a few reasons, money and I want to make something practical as a hobby. I could just buy some cheap radiators and call it a day, but that's not fun . And eventually implement a new fanless case design I thought up around 5 months ago, again as a hobby but practical as a challenge. (No not my current 50 gallon fun) It's going to be a while, tight lipped on it atm, I'll have to make the parts myself or get someone who can weld it.


It looks like copper and brass are fine, I was asking about this because brass barbs are cheap at Home Depot.
https://www.overclockers.com/forums/...pper-and-brass








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Last edited by treetops422; 09-03-2019 at 04:54 AM.
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post #6 of 35 (permalink) Old 09-03-2019, 06:08 AM
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Quote: Originally Posted by treetops422 View Post

4. Mixing metals is bad but, when you use say alum\copper\nickel what about brass\copper or steel\copper? steel\copper\brass?
Quote: Originally Posted by treetops422 View Post
If mixing steel and copper is a bad idea then why is every barb made of steel. (I'm guessing) I don't think this is an issue.
While you may not think it's an issue, science tends to disagree.


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post #7 of 35 (permalink) Old 09-03-2019, 07:36 AM
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cheap barbs are made of steel... not all barbs... as you even highlighted.

brass n copper is fine.

one think you really shouldn't cheap out on is coolant, in this instance i'd HIGHLY RECOMMEND Mayhem's Corrosion, and inhibitor droppers. It's incredibly effective, and incredibly cost efficient. I went through 3 gallons of coolant this weekend, n my droppers are still basically full. Best $30 i've ever spent on coolant.

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post #8 of 35 (permalink) Old 09-03-2019, 07:49 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote: Originally Posted by ciarlatano View Post
While you may not think it's an issue, science tends to disagree.

Correct me if I'm looking at the chart wrong, but it says it's ok to mix Alum and Copper....



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post #9 of 35 (permalink) Old 09-03-2019, 08:02 AM
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Quote: Originally Posted by treetops422 View Post
Correct me if I'm looking at the chart wrong, but it says it's ok to mix Alum and Copper....

look again - the copper corrodes alum but alum doesn't corrode copper.
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post #10 of 35 (permalink) Old 09-03-2019, 08:05 AM
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its best to stick to copper and brass.

Aluminum can be used (as seen in cheap radiators) but I'd avoid aluminum blocks. They aren't doing so well.

I'm going to say it again. Your experiment here is a prime candidate for Mayhem's biocide and inhibitor drops. They'll keep your mixed metal system for corroding.

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