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  Topic Review (Newest First)
05-30-2018 08:51 PM
KCDC Only issue I had with my AX corsairs was a faulty Link dongle that would cause a lot of random shutdowns/restarts. I switched to the Comm port version and had no issues since then.
05-27-2018 11:24 AM
shilka
Quote: Originally Posted by Bighouse View Post
I've only owned Corsair PSUs before, and have never had any issues with them. So I went with them again. When I used some online PSU configuration tools, it pointed me to at least a 1000 watt PSU given what I ultimately plan to do with the rig. I thought it would be best to bump it up a bit, just to play it safe and give me maximum adaptability.
Those so called calculators always overstate number by at least 28% and often much more so you went way overkill on wattage due to that misinformation
As long as you are not doing SLI or Crossfire a 650 watt would have been more than enough wattage, add a second video card and you are looking at 750-850 watts

And you are aware that Corsair does not make any of the PSU´s they sell?
You would have been better off with a Seasonic Prime Ultra instead of a HXi

Not that the HXi is bad the Prime Ultra is just much better

Edit: return that HX1200i you dont need that much wattage and while its not bad there are much better and newer options out there
05-27-2018 11:19 AM
Bighouse
Quote: Originally Posted by shilka View Post
The PSU you bought is a standard ATX PSU which means it will fit in every case that has room for an large ATX PSU and will work with all ATX motherboards which is pretty much every motherboard known to man

But with that being said there are better options out there and do you even need 1200 watts?
I've only owned Corsair PSUs before, and have never had any issues with them. So I went with them again. When I used some online PSU configuration tools, it pointed me to at least a 1000 watt PSU given what I ultimately plan to do with the rig. I thought it would be best to bump it up a bit, just to play it safe and give me maximum adaptability.
05-27-2018 09:12 AM
MNMadman
Quote: Originally Posted by shilka View Post
660 watts from the wall is about 600 watts used by the system so there was no need to replace the PSU
Its rated to do 750 watts so 600 watts is not a problem not even 24/7 operations
While that is true, I will save money in the long run due to higher efficiency with the larger power supply.
05-27-2018 09:08 AM
shilka
Quote: Originally Posted by MNMadman View Post
HX series is great. All of the reviews I have seen have given them high marks. My own personal experience with the HX750i and HX1000i agrees with those reviews. I used both of them in Heatripper Threadkiller (see sig for specs and build log). The only reason I switched from the 750W model is that my system pulls 660W from the wall while folding and that was a bit too close to the limit for my comfort.
660 watts from the wall is about 600 watts used by the system so there was no need to replace the PSU
Its rated to do 750 watts so 600 watts is not a problem not even 24/7 operations
05-27-2018 09:06 AM
MNMadman
Quote: Originally Posted by Bighouse View Post
Huh oh...Did I buy the right PSU? I JUST found this forum. I'm in the initial phase of ordering parts for an ATX build. I'll be installing an Asus Prime X399-deluxe mobo into a Thermaltake Core P5 case. All three items are ordered and arrive within a few days. The PSU I ordered was the Corsair HX1200i. In reading this forum (wish I had done so first) I see lots of mentions of the A1200i, but not so much for the HX1200i. Did I buy a PSU that isn't properly designed for the mobo or case?
HX series is great. All of the reviews I have seen have given them high marks. My own personal experience with the HX750i and HX1000i agrees with those reviews. I used both of them in Heatripper Threadkiller (see sig for specs and build log). The only reason I switched from the 750W model is that my system pulls 660W from the wall while folding and that was a bit too close to the limit for my comfort.

And yes, it will fit in the TT Core P5 case, which has an adjustable power supply mount. I used that case for my previous build (TT Green, link in my sig).
05-27-2018 09:06 AM
shilka
Quote: Originally Posted by Bighouse View Post
Huh oh...Did I buy the right PSU? I JUST found this forum. I'm in the initial phase of ordering parts for an ATX build. I'll be installing an Asus Prime X399-deluxe mobo into a Thermaltake Core P5 case. All three items are ordered and arrive within a few days. The PSU I ordered was the Corsair HX1200i. In reading this forum (wish I had done so first) I see lots of mentions of the A1200i, but not so much for the HX1200i. Did I buy a PSU that isn't properly designed for the mobo or case?
The PSU you bought is a standard ATX PSU which means it will fit in every case that has room for an large ATX PSU and will work with all ATX motherboards which is pretty much every motherboard known to man

But with that being said there are better options out there and do you even need 1200 watts?
05-27-2018 08:42 AM
Bighouse Huh oh...Did I buy the right PSU? I JUST found this forum. I'm in the initial phase of ordering parts for an ATX build. I'll be installing an Asus Prime X399-deluxe mobo into a Thermaltake Core P5 case. All three items are ordered and arrive within a few days. The PSU I ordered was the Corsair HX1200i. In reading this forum (wish I had done so first) I see lots of mentions of the A1200i, but not so much for the HX1200i. Did I buy a PSU that isn't properly designed for the mobo or case?
10-22-2017 02:03 AM
shilka http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/power-supply-specifications-atx-reference,review-32338-4.html

As the ATX power supply specification has evolved, there have been some changes in the cooling fan orientation and design. The ATX specification originally called for an 80 mm fan to be mounted along the inner side of the supply, where it could draw air in from the rear of the chassis and blow it inside across the motherboard. This kind of airflow runs in the opposite direction than most standard supplies, which exhaust air out the back of the supply through a hole in the case where the fan protrudes. The idea was that the reverse-flow design could cool the system more efficiently with only a single fan, eliminating the need for a fan (active) heatsink on the CPU.

Another benefit of the reverse-flow cooling is that the system would run cleaner, freer from dust and dirt. The case would be pressurized, so air would be continuously forced out of the cracks in the case—the opposite of what happens with a negative pressure design. For this reason, the reverse-flow cooling design is often referred to as a positive-pressure-ventilation design. On an ATX system with reverse-flow cooling, the air is blown out away from the drive because the only air intake is the single fan vent on the power supply at the rear. For systems that operate in extremely harsh environments, you can add a filter to the fan intake vent to further ensure that all the air entering the system is clean and free of dust.

Although this sounds like a good way to ventilate a system, the positive-pressure design needs to use a more powerful fan to pull the required amount of air through a filter and pressurize the case. Also, if a filter is used, it must be serviced periodically; depending on operating conditions, it could need changing or cleaning as often as every week. In addition, the heat load from the power supply on a fully loaded system heats the air being ingested, blowing warm air over the CPU and reducing the overall cooling capability.

As CPUs evolved to generate more and more heat, the cooling capability of the system became more critical and the positive-pressure design was simply not up to the task. Therefore, subsequent versions of the ATX specification were rewritten to allow both positive- and negative-pressure designs, but they emphasized the standard negative-pressure system with an exhaust fan on the power supply and an additional high-quality cooling fan blowing cool air right on the CPU as the best solution.

Because a standard negative-pressure system offers the greatest cooling capacity for a given fan’s airspeed and flow, virtually all recent ATX-style power supplies use a negative-pressure design, in which air flows out the back of the power supply. Most use an 80 mm fan mounted on the rear of the unit blowing outward, but some use an 80 mm, a 92 mm, or a 120 mm fan mounted on the inside upper or lower surface, with open vents on the rear of the system. In either example, the flow of air is such that air is always exhausted out of the system through the rear of the supply.
10-21-2017 09:18 PM
KedarWolf
Quote:
Originally Posted by shilka View Post

ATX specifications states that all ATX power supplies must have an intake fan to be ATX approved which means you PSU fan is sucking air in not blowing it out

Thank you for that, I never knew.

I now have the fan on top blowing air OUT of the case.

Strange thing though, the logo on my AX1500i on the right side of the case is inverted from the other side so looking from the right side is still upside down. frown.gif
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