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  Topic Review (Newest First)
08-23-2012 08:18 PM
Puck If you connect the green from the slave psu and the nearest ground to the corresponding pins on the motherboard connector, they will both turn on and off together both with the main switch and for hibernation.

Like stated though, there are few times when dual PSUs are neccesary or even worthwhile.
08-20-2012 11:50 AM
eXXon I have 2 Corsair 600 watts PSU's (one is CX & the other GS) that I would like to use for my sig until I get my original PSU returned from TT.

The guide seems outdated and intended for old PSU's.....would it work for newer psu's? (the pics are all missing)
05-22-2011 06:12 AM
Phaedrus2129
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joey23art View Post
I have an 8 year old 850 watt power supply and a 3 year old 350 watt power supply. I have 2 SATA hdd, and 1 IDE DVD drive. I just purchased a video card that needs 2 6pin PCI Express connectors. (I will use the supplied Molex adapters though)
What would my ideal dual PSU setup be? Which power supply should be the main and what should each power supply power? I only have 2 fans, including the CPU fan.

Thanks.
Neither. Buy a new PSU.

Just because you can do something, doesn't mean it's a good idea. I plan to make some major revisions to this guide to make clear when it's a good idea to dual PSU, and when it will end in tears.
05-22-2011 02:44 AM
Joey23art I have an 8 year old 850 watt power supply and a 3 year old 350 watt power supply. I have 2 SATA hdd, and 1 IDE DVD drive. I just purchased a video card that needs 2 6pin PCI Express connectors. (I will use the supplied Molex adapters though)
What would my ideal dual PSU setup be? Which power supply should be the main and what should each power supply power? I only have 2 fans, including the CPU fan.

Thanks.
04-24-2011 06:06 AM
Snowmen Just wondering... If you jump the second PSU and plug fans or watercooling pumps on it, normally they will stay on permanently unless the PSU itself is turned off right?

Thanks
04-04-2011 01:03 PM
Phaedrus2129 Independent regulated:
Antec HCG-900
DSCF2156.JPG

Group regulated:
SeaSonic S12II 520W
DSCF2264.JPG

DC-DC regulated:
Antec TruePower New 750W
DSCF0572.JPG

Group regulated with linear regulated +3.3V:
Linkworld LPSW 350W
DSCF0332.jpg
04-04-2011 12:55 PM
Phaedrus2129 You can tell if a PSU is group regulated by looking for coils on the secondary. Basically, look at where all the wires connect to the board, next to them will be lots of capacitors and a number of large chokes like this:

2010111914443136420.jpg

Three coils = Independent regulated (safe to crossload)
Two coils = Group regulated (NOT safe to crossload)
One coil + daughterboard = DC-DC (safe to crossload (+12V-heavy crossload only--+5V crossload not recommended))
One coil = Group regulated with 3.3V regulated from +5V (probably a piece of garbage, so don't load it at all)
04-04-2011 11:26 AM
Shub I don't know if it would hurt the internal circuitry, but depending on what effect crossloading is having in the electrical output, it may damage whatever is connected to the PSU.
I don't know if it's possible to tell if a PSU is group-regulated just by looking at the guts. If it is, then I'm not knowledgeable enough to tell. If you can't tell from looking at the guts, then you'd need a load tester.
04-04-2011 11:18 AM
ccrunner863
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shub;12997276 
It depends on the unit. A group-regulated unit would require a minimum load on all rails in order to deliver stable power. A single fan on the +5V rail would not be enough to offset the problems you may encounter in a group-regulated unit when crossloading.

So will neglecting to load the 5v rail actually hurt any of the PSU's internal circuitry? (and is there an easy way to tell if it's group-regulated?)
04-04-2011 10:18 AM
Shub
Quote:
Originally Posted by ccrunner863;12997223 
I've heard a lot of places that if you do this, you need to have a constant load on the psu or you can damage it... any truth to that? I'm using a crappy 280w psu that I had laying around to power a custom slot car track biggrin.gif but i have an 80mm fan hooked up to one of the 5v lines (red) to give it load just in case...

Is my fan necessary? My (very limited) knowledge of electronics tells me that at the very most, all i would really need is a small load for a short time after it is turned on to charge up the caps's


It depends on the unit. A group-regulated unit would require a minimum load on all rails in order to deliver stable power. A single fan on the +5V rail would not be enough to offset the problems you may encounter in a group-regulated unit when crossloading.
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