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  Topic Review (Newest First)
08-19-2019 07:57 AM
doyll
Quote: Originally Posted by UnexplodedCow View Post
Lapping by hand is imprecise, but still better than a convex base. I didn't have time to try machining the base properly, but went with the hand method, using diamond-coated files that I use on guitar repairs/builds (that are flat enough for the purpose), then finished up with sandpaper (I only had up to 400 grit) on a flat metal plate (glass will work, too), and then polishing compound to at least smooth things out some. The idea is go to slowly, stay accurate, and prevent the base from being convex again, or from being tilted.

A good, flat, knife-sharpening block will also work well. With such a large cooler, it's easy to reconvex the base, so inverting it (fins down) will help. I had mine slowly spinning while I used the file, and it made a starburst, or asterisk type of pattern overall (though it was constantly turning). The base did have a small ridge that was more like this symbol: /

Once I wore that down to cover the IHS, as the base is a little larger than, I flipped it over, and used the sandpaper, which was adhesive-backed to prevent it from sliding. I'd continuously turn it while moving it back and forth, and this not only worked faster for me than a back-forth/turn method, but it also kept the base flat. Keep the fingers as close to the base as possible, lock the arms, and use your torso to move. This will help minimize odd movements, and prevent the heatsink from tipping, which will convex the edge.

If you're really unsure, try contacting a machine shop locally and see what they'd charge; the end result would be very flat.
Nice guide.
Anyone looking to remove the convex for cooler base needs to be very sure their IHS on CPU is not concave .. because if it is you will end up with a void between flat base of cooler and concave top of IHS.
08-19-2019 07:18 AM
UnexplodedCow Lapping by hand is imprecise, but still better than a convex base. I didn't have time to try machining the base properly, but went with the hand method, using diamond-coated files that I use on guitar repairs/builds (that are flat enough for the purpose), then finished up with sandpaper (I only had up to 400 grit) on a flat metal plate (glass will work, too), and then polishing compound to at least smooth things out some. The idea is go to slowly, stay accurate, and prevent the base from being convex again, or from being tilted.

A good, flat, knife-sharpening block will also work well. With such a large cooler, it's easy to reconvex the base, so inverting it (fins down) will help. I had mine slowly spinning while I used the file, and it made a starburst, or asterisk type of pattern overall (though it was constantly turning). The base did have a small ridge that was more like this symbol: /

Once I wore that down to cover the IHS, as the base is a little larger than, I flipped it over, and used the sandpaper, which was adhesive-backed to prevent it from sliding. I'd continuously turn it while moving it back and forth, and this not only worked faster for me than a back-forth/turn method, but it also kept the base flat. Keep the fingers as close to the base as possible, lock the arms, and use your torso to move. This will help minimize odd movements, and prevent the heatsink from tipping, which will convex the edge.

If you're really unsure, try contacting a machine shop locally and see what they'd charge; the end result would be very flat.
08-18-2019 03:16 PM
HalongPort Those are amazing results.
In the meantime, I've returned my LGM RT and replaced it with an ARO-M14.
My temperatures dropped from 80-82°C to 74-75°C.

However, I am still thinking about going with the True Spirit 140 Power or with an expensive Eisbaer (or equivalent AiO) just to get the most out of my 3800X.

How did you lap your cooler?
Obviously, there are a lot of tutorials and reports about lapping on the internet and a short summary is just to get a thick glass plate, sandpaper (800,1000,1200) and either make an eight or push the cooler in one direction 5-8 times and rotate it 45° clockwise.
In the end, polish it with a suitable paste.

That's quite scary for someone who never has lapped a cooler or CPU in his life. Buy a new cooler for 45-50€, lap it wrong and you neither have a working cooler or a refund option.


Edit:
In addtion, I am also thinking about replacing the 3800X with a 3700X.
My 3800X scores the same as a 3700X in Cinebench Multi and it won't boost correctly.
A 3700X produces less heat thus the ARO-M14 should be the perfect match for it.
08-18-2019 09:59 AM
doyll True Spirit 140 Power really is the best cooler out there .. and much lower priced as well!
08-17-2019 03:20 PM
UnexplodedCow Finally got the 3900X today, and test results over the 3700X are hilarious. 2C hotter under Prime95, and literally the same temp (70C) using Handbrake, still using the TS140P and lower RPM.
08-16-2019 07:39 AM
Owterspace I didn’t bother milling mine down like I was going to. I did just rotate it and made sure I had enough paste, also when I tested last, 2 out of my 3 exhausts on my R4 were not running. @ stock clocks on my x5690 I am seeing the same temps again as I was seeing with LGMRT. For fifty bucks you really can’t go wrong with this cooler.
08-16-2019 06:11 AM
UnexplodedCow Yes, I know this. My entire point is that the RPM (and noise) was lower, and using single fan, than dual fans at 100% on the D15. Even without stating the RPM, that it has one less fan, and is not 100% points toward a conclusion.
08-16-2019 05:24 AM
doyll
Quote: Originally Posted by UnexplodedCow View Post
Well, I tried a third TS140P, and flattened out the base. It averaged 76C for Prime95, using the same settings in that as before. The main difference is that it's using only one fan (A TY143) and it's on a slower fan curve than the one I used to test the D15, so that's a bit of a handicap for it to achieve the same temps (at a lower noise value) than the D15.

It also takes up less room, and the fan clips are far easier to work with. I'll probably clip on a second fan and see how it does. Good heatsink when it makes good contact.
When comparing coolers it is always good to record temps with fans at same speed, not fan curve. When I compared TY-140/147/147A/143 against Noctua cooelr fans I found Thermalright TY series fans to perform a little better (1-2c lower temps at same speed) all while making less noise and having a nicer sound profile. While 1-2c isn't much of a difference, their sounding nicer when loud enough to be heard makes them the better choice for me.
08-15-2019 08:19 PM
UnexplodedCow Well, I tried a third TS140P, and flattened out the base. It averaged 76C for Prime95, using the same settings in that as before. The main difference is that it's using only one fan (A TY143) and it's on a slower fan curve than the one I used to test the D15, so that's a bit of a handicap for it to achieve the same temps (at a lower noise value) than the D15.

It also takes up less room, and the fan clips are far easier to work with. I'll probably clip on a second fan and see how it does. Good heatsink when it makes good contact.
08-12-2019 11:42 PM
clannagh
Quote: Originally Posted by UnexplodedCow View Post
Indeed, I did, in all but the very corners, to level out the base. True, bare copper does now preclude the use of any gallium based liquid metal, but I'll live, and recently acquired some Kryonaut to try compared to the MX4 or NT-H1.
If your really keen there are nickel plate kits around though they are probably a bit pricey if this is the only job you would ever use it for.

Also note that Noctua has released NT-H2 which has replaced NT-H1.
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