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  Topic Review (Newest First)
02-28-2015 06:42 AM
mtcn77 Does it work? I have seen litecoin forum users who undervolted to [email protected] 1GHz. Also, this directly implies your case.Gigabyte Radeon R9 290 Windforce 4gb Overclock - RSI Community Forums
02-27-2015 09:43 PM
Nonamedota
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcn77 View Post

It is quite finicky since everytime it starts, it drops my clocks to 100/150 and voltage to 0.95v(I hate it). Yet, it doesn't come with a voltage monitor to find out whether you set it right. Conversely, MSI Afterburner can correctly check whether its own input voltage modifications passed through.
So, you will need not 1, not 2, but 3 software tools in my method: Asus Gpu Monitor to verify ATT's modifications & MSI Afterburner. MSI Afterburner is sometimes unable to intercept parameters in presence of ATT, therefore if you notice MSI Afterburner not working, you go to the other tool and try and adjust from ATT all the while checking whether things are working through Asus Gpu Monitor.
Just pick your reference clock and reduce voltages & clocks preferrably via MSI AFTERBURNER, not ATT since its voltage steps are more coarse(0.05v steps rather than 0.005v) and fire up "3D renderer > find max gpu". It will start finding single errors and backing off momentarily followed by rechecking that next integer frequency. Note both voltage & frequency (decline 2 mhz for safety) and keep filling the frequency plot along your target voltage range. Once done, you will have your own performance profile. biggrin.gif
You add extra voltage settings by clicking the ellipsis next to the voltage level. Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

ill try that
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcn77 View Post

What temperatures do GPU-Z report for the vrms? Once when I dismantled the stock 5770, I couldn't substitute the single application vrm pads and the card started to crash under load. Lucky for me, I had some thermal rubber lying around.biggrin.gif
You have to apply even pressure for the base to set accordingly before tightening the nuts - I've heard that process of the assembly is precision oriented, afaik.

around 10C below the gpu temp
02-27-2015 04:07 PM
mtcn77 What temperatures do GPU-Z report for the vrms? Once when I dismantled the stock 5770, I couldn't substitute the single application vrm pads and the card started to crash under load. Lucky for me, I had some thermal rubber lying around.biggrin.gif
You have to apply even pressure for the base to set accordingly before tightening the nuts - I've heard that process of the assembly is precision oriented, afaik.
02-27-2015 03:59 PM
mtcn77 It is quite finicky since everytime it starts, it drops my clocks to 100/150 and voltage to 0.95v(I hate it). Yet, it doesn't come with a voltage monitor to find out whether you set it right. Conversely, MSI Afterburner can correctly check whether its own input voltage modifications passed through.
So, you will need not 1, not 2, but 3 software tools in my method: Asus Gpu Monitor to verify ATT's modifications & MSI Afterburner. MSI Afterburner is sometimes unable to intercept parameters in presence of ATT, therefore if you notice MSI Afterburner not working, you go to the other tool and try and adjust from ATT all the while checking whether things are working through Asus Gpu Monitor.
Just pick your reference clock and reduce voltages & clocks preferrably via MSI AFTERBURNER, not ATT since its voltage steps are more coarse(0.05v steps rather than 0.005v) and fire up "3D renderer > find max gpu". It will start finding single errors and backing off momentarily followed by rechecking that next integer frequency. Note both voltage & frequency (decline 2 mhz for safety) and keep filling the frequency plot along your target voltage range. Once done, you will have your own performance profile. biggrin.gif
You add extra voltage settings by clicking the ellipsis next to the voltage level. Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Also, in exceptions Asus Gpu Monitor doesn't notice when ATT's voltage modifications wouldn't apply. At those moments, checking the MSI Afterburner monitor will reveal an absence of voltage change from the point in time chart it should be graphed.
02-27-2015 03:38 PM
Nonamedota
Quote:
Originally Posted by boot318 View Post

That isn't your problem. You have bad TIM/mount applied to your card. It is going to get pretty dangerous if you guys chose to ignore it.

I'm removing the card from the loop now to re apply it
02-27-2015 03:35 PM
boot318
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nonamedota View Post

do you have any tutorial how to use ATT?

That isn't your problem. You have bad TIM/mount applied to your card. It is going to get pretty dangerous if you guys chose to ignore it.
02-27-2015 03:29 PM
Nonamedota
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcn77 View Post

1.5v voltmod @1.3GHz, or not, the voltage transistor delay follows a diminishing return function for which I don't know the right nomenclature(neither if I'm true, lol!).
ATT is fantastic for detection of even the slightest errors and recalibration of overclock frequencies in accordance by swift reduction. As it finds the highest overclock per voltage threshold, the gpu begins operating at "near threshold voltage"; thereby requring the lowest current at the lowest temperature attainable at that frequency by virtue of undervolting, improves the resistance and there's spare electric potential in vrms to drive clocks even higher per vrm configuration limited electric potential on the card, imo.

do you have any tutorial how to use ATT?
02-27-2015 03:03 PM
Blameless
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nonamedota View Post

yes but im sure it was bad applied

Then fix that before doing anything else.

Bad TIM applications on lidless parts aren't just warmer running, they can be outright dangerous to the chip. You may have left parts of the die completely uncooled.
02-27-2015 02:56 PM
mtcn77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nonamedota View Post

for oveclocking we shouldnt overvolt it? O_o
1.5v voltmod @1.3GHz, or not, the voltage transistor delay follows a diminishing return function for which I don't know the right nomenclature(neither if I'm true, lol!).
ATT is fantastic for detection of even the slightest errors and recalibration of overclock frequencies in accordance by swift reduction. As it finds the highest overclock per voltage threshold, the gpu begins operating at "near threshold voltage"; thereby requring the lowest current at the lowest temperature attainable at that frequency by virtue of undervolting, improves the resistance and there's spare electric potential in vrms to drive clocks even higher per vrm configuration limited electric potential on the card, imo.
Quote:
Near room temperature, the resistivity of metals typically increases as temperature is increased, while the resistivity of semiconductors typically decreases as temperature is increased
02-27-2015 02:32 PM
Nonamedota
Quote:
Originally Posted by boot318 View Post

You guys did something terribly wrong with cooling. With an CLC, or "RED MOD", on my 290x I get 55C on core and 72C on VRM (+100mv core 50% Power-Limit).


You used thermal paste for the GPU core.... right?


yes but im sure it was bad applied
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