Overclock.net - An Overclocking Community - Reply to Topic

Thread: [Build Log] The Big Red "Devastator" CaseLabs THW10 - Custom Powder Coating Reply to Thread
Title:
Message:

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Overclock.net - An Overclocking Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in


  Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

  Topic Review (Newest First)
12-09-2019 05:01 AM
ruffhi
Quote: Originally Posted by Barefooter View Post
Hey ruffhi, I did do some flow testing of the loop after it was completely finished, and I of course took notes, but after your question I realized that that information never made it into any of the build log posts.

I could run the pumps at a lower speed just fine, but since they are no louder running at 100% and the loop temperatures really did not vary too much with the pumps set to lower speeds, I would prefer to have a higher flow rate so I just leave the pumps set at 100% all the time.
Those are excellent results. I have noticed the pump noise change with different RPMs too ... and you can dial it up / down to you find a sweet spot re noise.

Re your flow rates, that is radically different from what I am seeing on my PC. My cooling loop ...

  • 2 x radiators (Hardware Labs Black Ice SR2 120.3 Multiport Satin White Radiator - white with white fins)
  • 2 x pumps (Aquacomputer D5 Pump Core | PWM Equipped)
  • 1 x pump header (EK-XTOP Revo Dual D5 Serial)
  • 1 x GPU block (Watercool HEATKILLER® IV for GTX 1080 - ACETAL Ni)
  • 1 x CPU block (Watercool HEATKILLER® IV Pro (Copper AN))

I have gone back and forth with my loop. I started with quite a few hard 90º turns but swapped them out for the triple rotary snakes.

I had one run that I have been thinking about ... I just swapped it from soft plastic to a complete run of fittings.

Flow has always been pretty horrible. At 100%, (pre fitting run), I could get 1.2 GPM. I was running it at about 75% and getting a flow rate of 0.95 GPM. After swapping to the full fitting run, flow has dropped to 0.9 GPM at 100%. I am currently getting 0.65 GPM at 80%.

I thought that one of my pumps might be bad so I installed a on/off switch on each pump. I can either run it with both pumps or turn the left or right pump off. Turning off one pump (either one), cuts the flow rate to under 0.4 GPM. Conclusion - each pump is as good as the other one.

My flow meter (Aquacomputer flow rate sensor "high flow USB" G1/4) could be off? I have ordered a different flow, Barrowch that is in the mail.

I am going to swap back to air and test each component re flow restriction.
12-08-2019 01:39 PM
Barefooter
Quote: Originally Posted by ruffhi View Post
Barefoot ... how many pumps do you have driving your loop, how many radiators and coolers in that loop? What is your flow rate?

Hey ruffhi, I did do some flow testing of the loop after it was completely finished, and I of course took notes, but after your question I realized that that information never made it into any of the build log posts. So here it is now:

Devastator Flow Rate Testing

The system is one big loop with two Aquacomputer D5 PWM pumps in series. There are six radiators in total, four Hardware Labs Black Ice SR2 560mm in the top and bottom, and two Hardware Labs Black Ice SR2 280mm in front. Even though there are six radiators, these are low restriction radiators.

There are also seven water blocks, but they are all low restriction waterblocks, with the two video card waterblocks in parallel and the two hard disk drive waterblocks also in parallel.

I tested the pumps with various speeds between 40% and 100% to test the flow rates and what it did to loop temperatures. There were two specific speeds where the pumps would make a slight hum noise. At 70% pump speed there was a slight hum, and an even louder hum at 50% power. The rest of the speeds you really could not hear the pumps, and certainly would never hear them over the fan noise.

In this testing I was loading the system with the Real Bench stress test. This really puts just about the max load on the system that you can. This was done with an ambient temperature of 73° F, with the fans all set to 700 RPM and my 4.8 GHz daily overclock profile on the CPU with a 1.25 vcore.

Starting at 40% and going up 10% at a time all the way to 100% and then one final test back at 40% again. It is interesting how the air/water deltas are slightly better with 40% power and less flow rate.




This testing was done April 14, 2019 and shortly after this the maximum flow rate at 100% pump speed settled in at 1.1 GPM which is the same flow rate I’m getting as I write this, and I just now rechecked the flow rate at 40% power and it is .8 GPM.

I could run the pumps at a lower speed just fine, but since they are no louder running at 100% and the loop temperatures really did not vary too much with the pumps set to lower speeds, I would prefer to have a higher flow rate so I just leave the pumps set at 100% all the time.

As to the air/water deltas, the temperatures you see in the chart above are the hottest I’ve ever seen. I did get slightly better air/water deltas when the build was still in my work shop due to better air flow all around the case.

Now that it is in my office under the desk the air/water delta once the system is fully warmed up is usually around 3°C. It will go up a little bit more when gaming, but even this last summer when my office was almost 90°F the highest I ever saw the air/water delta get to was 4.5°C



.
12-08-2019 01:26 PM
Barefooter
Quote: Originally Posted by OCDesign View Post
What is the quality of construction like on those SteelSeries headphones? Good materials? Well made? I may finally have to replace my prehistoric Razer set, the oldest and most dependable piece of tech I still use (for long hours pretty much every day). I love them, particularly for using common (i.e. easily replaceable) rechargeable batteries and the simple drop onto the top of the base station to charge, but mostly because they’re the only pair of headphones I’ve ever owned that haven’t broken, either physically or electronically, in very short order. Unfortunately the low battery warning has recently become dodgy and the occasional random beep is now a lot less than occasional. So unless my entire stock of AAA batteries is rubbish - and they may be - then it’s misreading the charge.

Glad the monitor setup gets the seal of approval! When you do your upgrade I wholly endorse getting a 21:9 widescreen - became an instant fan the second mine arrived - but absolutely right that you’d need a different one. This configuration was highly tailored to a purpose; it being less suited to whatever gaming I also do is a trade-off that just has to be accepted. However I’m not remotely surprised that you wouldn't have room for my monitor setup – I don’t have room for my monitor setup! A new extension piece for my desk, plus the existing one originally for the Ironbeast test bench, had to be hastily improvised from scrap so that it all just about fits. I’ve been working on a new desk design on and off for years now, still haven’t got around to building it...

My test bench rig is definitely a hopeless mess, albeit a pretty cool hopeless mess, but it works; crosslinked loop configuration like Ironbeast. I was going to start a new build log for it all back in April – Precursor – but ran into some…um…“issues”…with ASUS which put a fairly hefty dent in my enthusiasm (to put it mildly). Sad that I had to retire the Beast, I’m still hopelessly fond of it. Overall its 2014 hardware didn’t quite make the five-years working lifespan; it held on valiantly but it was definitely becoming “eccentric” in its behaviour, as its predecessor did before the end, and there was just no way it could be upgraded short of a full (and likely problematic) rebuild. Given the complexity and precision of your work I suspect Devastator may meet the same fate in the end. For the moment I’m thinking of rewiring IB’s internals to power the pumps and lighting without the motherboard and keeping it as a room decoration.

I’m finally getting back to answering your question here, with more experience using the headset. I have now been using this headset for four months. I finished playing through the last half of Far Cry New Dawn, and I’m almost all of the way through the Shadow of the Tomb Raider game.

As to the construction of the headset it seems quit sturdy and well made. I saw in one review the guy was twisting the headset around like he was trying to break them (they did not break), but I’m not quite that brave to do that with my headset unnecessarily

Arctis Pro Wireless Headset Four Month Review

Now that I have had four months of use with this headset I can say that they are very comfortable even for a long gaming sessions. But the absolute best feature of this headset is the batteries!

I love not having to pull out and use a charging cable. It’s super quick and easy to swap out the batteries. The batteries last a long time and if you don’t want to take the chance on having to change batteries in the middle of a long gaming session you can swap the batteries before you start.

Obviously how they sound is a pretty important feature as well, so I should also mention that yes this headset sounds fantastic too!

DTS Sound Unbound

One thing I did not realize at first is that you have to download the “DTS Sound Unbound” app from the windows store to fully utilize the “DTS Headphone:X” surround feature that this headset has.

Just install the app and right click the sound icon in the system tray to turn it on. There is some demo mp4 tracks in the DTS Sound Unbound app, and there are also some good demo videos on youtube. Turning on the DTS Headphone:X feature certainly made a noticeable difference in the surround sound for me!

Using the Optical Input

This turned out to be a bonus feature that I did not even think about when I bought the headset. I hooked up a short optical cable from my Directv Genie Mini receiver sitting on my desk into the back of the headset transmitter box and now I can listen to the TV that is sitting on my desk over the headset as well if I want to.

Range

Another thing that I never tested or mentioned on my previous write up of this Arctis Pro Wireless headset is the range it has with good reception. My last headset was the Turtle Beach Earforce PX51wireless which is all I have to compare it with.

My office is upstairs in the back of the house and the Turtle Beach headset would start breaking up after walking about ½ of the way to the front of the upstairs floor, and would completely cut out if I walked any further. If I walked downstairs the Turtle Beach headset would not play at all.

With the Arctis Pro Wireless headset I can literally walk around anyplace in the house or garage with great reception and no cutting out at all. So there is really nothing bad I can say about this headset. I am very happy with my purchase and I would highly recommend this headset if you are looking for a wireless headset

I also bought a headset holder that you can flip up if you want when not in use. This is a great place for me to store the headset where it is easy to reach, and it’s not taking up any desktop space like my last headset did.






.
11-19-2019 04:02 AM
ruffhi Barefoot ... how many pumps do you have driving your loop, how many radiators and coolers in that loop? What is your flow rate?
09-13-2019 02:39 PM
OCDesign What is the quality of construction like on those SteelSeries headphones? Good materials? Well made? I may finally have to replace my prehistoric Razer set, the oldest and most dependable piece of tech I still use (for long hours pretty much every day). I love them, particularly for using common (i.e. easily replaceable) rechargeable batteries and the simple drop onto the top of the base station to charge, but mostly because they’re the only pair of headphones I’ve ever owned that haven’t broken, either physically or electronically, in very short order. Unfortunately the low battery warning has recently become dodgy and the occasional random beep is now a lot less than occasional. So unless my entire stock of AAA batteries is rubbish - and they may be - then it’s misreading the charge.

Glad the monitor setup gets the seal of approval! When you do your upgrade I wholly endorse getting a 21:9 widescreen - became an instant fan the second mine arrived - but absolutely right that you’d need a different one. This configuration was highly tailored to a purpose; it being less suited to whatever gaming I also do is a trade-off that just has to be accepted. However I’m not remotely surprised that you wouldn't have room for my monitor setup – I don’t have room for my monitor setup! A new extension piece for my desk, plus the existing one originally for the Ironbeast test bench, had to be hastily improvised from scrap so that it all just about fits. I’ve been working on a new desk design on and off for years now, still haven’t got around to building it...

My test bench rig is definitely a hopeless mess, albeit a pretty cool hopeless mess, but it works; crosslinked loop configuration like Ironbeast. I was going to start a new build log for it all back in April – Precursor – but ran into some…um…“issues”…with ASUS which put a fairly hefty dent in my enthusiasm (to put it mildly). Sad that I had to retire the Beast, I’m still hopelessly fond of it. Overall its 2014 hardware didn’t quite make the five-years working lifespan; it held on valiantly but it was definitely becoming “eccentric” in its behaviour, as its predecessor did before the end, and there was just no way it could be upgraded short of a full (and likely problematic) rebuild. Given the complexity and precision of your work I suspect Devastator may meet the same fate in the end. For the moment I’m thinking of rewiring IB’s internals to power the pumps and lighting without the motherboard and keeping it as a room decoration.
09-04-2019 07:25 PM
Barefooter SteelSeries Arctis Pro Wireless Gaming Headset

Today I’m going to discuss the SteelSeries Arctis Pro Wireless Gaming Headset. It is not going to be a full on review, but rather my decision making process for purchasing them over other wireless headsets, and to share my experience with them along with a few pictures.

I’ve been using a Turtle Beach Earforce PX51 wireless headset for about five years now. They are quite comfortable and sound great. I would probably just keep using these because I have been happy with them except for one extremely annoying fault.

They automatically shut off while watching a video, but not while gaming. I mostly just use them for gaming so I’ve been living with it, but now they are starting to shut off during cut scenes or even quiet sections of games. I can reach up and turn them right back on again, but I’ve had it!

If you google the problem it is quite wide spread and Turtle Beach either can’t fix the problem, or is just neglecting to actually fix the problem. Therefore Turtle Beach will NEVER receive any of my money again!

Here’s the now retired Turtle Beach headset




During the time I was building this rig, I have been researching wireless headsets. I know there are many great wired headsets out there, but I just hate the wire so “wireless” is a must have feature for me!

At first I was comparing the Steelseries Siberia 800, and the ASTRO Gaming A50 headsets. I actually went back and forth on these two headsets. I liked how the A50s charged while sitting in the dock. Then the SteelSeries Arctis Pro Wireless Gaming Headsets came out, and I went back and forth again finally deciding on the Acrtis Pro Headset.

So I put those on my wish list and decided to wait until the build was done before actually buying them since I didn’t really get much gaming in during the building process. Then I saw bluedevil’s review here on OCN of the just recently released Sennheiser GSP 670 Wireless Gaming Headset. This is their first foray into “wireless gaming headsets”.

I proceeded to read every review and watch every youtube video I could find on these new Sennheiser GSP 670s, and almost bought them. AnandTech did a very thorough review of these which was enough to sway me to stick with my plan to buy the SteelSeries Arctis Pro Wireless headset.

Besides that particular review there were four main reasons for selecting the SteelSeries Arctis Pro Headset over the Sennheiser GSP 670 Headset:

  • Comfort
  • Batteries
  • Software
  • Microphone

Comfort

Starting with comfort, I liked the fact that the Sennheiser GSP 670s had an adjustable top headband, but numerous reviewers complained that even with the headband set to the largest size they still felt the headphones squeezed their heads too much, particularly at the bottom of the ear cups, while all the reviews of the SteelSeries headsets stated that they were extremely comfortable.

I’ve been using them for about two weeks now, have worn them for up to three hours straight, and I can attest that they are very comfortable. However, be aware that this headset barely fits me. The top band is not adjustable, and I have the adjustable band as large as it will go. My head almost hits the top band but not quite. I measured my head circumference around the forehead at 23.5 inches, so if you have a very large head this headset may not fit you.

The ear cups are soft, comfortable, and slightly larger than my Turtle Beach headset that I have been using. The ear cups do not touch or pull on my ears at all.

Batteries

Next is the batteries, the Sennheiser GSP 670 headset has a built in battery that is not user changeable which I really don’t like because eventually the battery is going to die or not stay charged for very long. Plus you have to pull out a USB cable and plug it into the headset to charge it. My Turtle Beach headset was the same way, and I always found it to be kind of a pain in the neck.

The SteelSeries headset comes with two batteries! One in the headset and one sits in the base station and charges while you are using the other one. Just using the headset out of the box I got more than eight hours of game play before I got the low battery warning beep.

I merely paused the game, the right side ear cup is magnetically held in place so you just pop it off and swap batteries with the one in the base station. Boom right back to action with no need to drag a USB cable out to charge the headset or have to have it plugged in to finish that gaming session.






Also you can buy another pair of batteries for $19.95 if you ever need new batteries. This was a huge benefit to me over the Sennheiser headset.

Software

The Sennheiser GSP 670 Wireless Gaming Headset uses a USB Dongle that communicates with the headset via software. Apparently the software is fairly new and not the greatest. It does have a 7.1 surround sound mimicking setting, but every review I read stated that it actually sounded better with it off.

Here’s a software screen shot I pulled of the web.




I personally don’t like to add software to my computer that I don’t really need, and I would prefer not to have to depend on software for my headset to function properly. Just as an example I know that with the newest Windows 10 versions, the people with Creative Labs Sound Blaster Z and ZXR cards are not working properly any longer due to the fact that Creative won’t update the drivers or software.

That is kind of and apples to oranges comparison because Creative Labs has always had notoriously horrible support, and Sennheiser might do a great job of software support… but maybe not, you never really know.

The SteelSeries Actis Pro headset does not use any software. It just uses the desktop base station. You plug in two USB cables into the back of your computer, one for power, one for sound, and Windows installs it immediately.

Here’s how the Sound window looks once you plug it in.




Not having to rely on software to use the headset is another huge advantage of the SteelSeries Arcis Pro over the Sennheiser GSP 670 headset.

Microphone

I don’t use a microphone all that much personally because I don’t do much online multiplayer gaming, but from the reviews I’ve read it seems that the SteelSeries mic is better than the mic on the Sennheiser headset. In fact, in some reviews that is what the reviewer was most disappointed in was the microphone quality.

The Sennheiser mic swings up when not in use and comes on automatically when you swing it down, where the SteelSeries mic pushes up into the left ear cup which I like because it’s more out of the way and cleaner looking when not in use which is how it will be for me most of the time.

Price

Ok I know I said that there were four main reasons I liked the SteelSeries Arcis Pro headset over the Sennheiser GSP 670 headset, and this is the fifth reason. Just think of this as a bonus

The Sennheiser GSP 670 headset lists for $350 on their web site, and that was the only place I could find to purchase them when I was doing my research, and the SteelSeries Arcis Pro headset normally lists for $330.

So the price is fairly close, and honestly I was going to buy the one I wanted no matter what. But I was able to pick up the SteelSeries Arcis Pro headset on sale on Amazon for $280, so that was nice getting it for $70 less!

Now that I’ve explained why I decided to go with the SteelSeries Arcis Pro headset, let’s take a look at a few unboxing pictures.












I’m only using two of these cables, but it has all the cables you need in the box.




How does it sound?

Now I am no sound aficionado, but for the ten or so hours of gaming I have done while using this headset it sounds fantastic to me! It does come with a sound volume limiter turned on by default, with games I had it turned all the way up or the second highest volume level, and it was plenty loud enough.

For videos I found myself turning it down quite a bit from the highest setting. I did turn the sound limiter off though, and it’s for sure plenty loud enough for games.

I don’t listen to much music while at my desk, but I do have an extensive classic rock music collection, so I did spends some time listening to some music with the volume turned all the way up with the sound limiter off. With Led Zeppelin, AC/DC, and others cranked up to the max, there was no distortion at all! I even played around with the built in equalizer. Here is a custom setting I set up directly on the desktop base station.




You can adjust the volume either with the desktop base station or the easy to find wheel on the left ear cup. Either way you adjust the volume the display on the desktop base station temporarily turns like this and gives you a nice visual of how high the volume is.




After a few seconds it turns back to the normal display. Here you can see the charge level of the battery in the base station too.




I have not tried or used the blue tooth feature yet, but it supposedly works flawlessly.

So far I am very happy with my decision and purchase of this SteelSeries Arctis Pro Headset and I plan to get many years of enjoyment out of it


Edit: Just two days after I originally posted this Toms Hardware came out with a review of this headset.

Plus the price has dropped even further to $264.
.
09-03-2019 07:27 PM
Barefooter
Quote: Originally Posted by OCDesign View Post
Yes, that looks more like it! The SLI-disabled numbers are much closer in line with the margin I’d expect those finely tuned overclocks to be delivering. Thought the earlier lot looked a little off somehow - underwhelming - given that our systems use the same card.

Must say I’m quite stunned how much the dual-GPU setup is holding both Odyssey and Origins back; I can understand NVLink not helping with something that doesn’t support it, but didn’t expect it to yielding worse performance. (The 39-37 with the 200% silly setting is in margin of error territory can probably be disregarded). Presumably, since it hits both titles but not Tomb Raider or Far Cry, it’s a quirk of the AC game engine?

Anyway, as requested, a quick picture of my monitor setup (spoilered for convenience):

Spoiler!
Wow that is a super spectacular monitor set-up! Thank you for sharing a picture of it! Hope I did not offend you with my "low-res" comment, that certainly was not my intention as I was not envisioning a wide screen in the middle. Having the same vertical resolution across all three monitors makes it superior for your use scenario, and for a work station that is about as good of a set-up as you can get monitor wise.

I don't have enough room for your set-up. My desk can hold three 27" monitors for a surround set-up with one over the top, but at this point I think I'm going to go for a wide screen, with my current 27" Acer Predator as a secondary monitor to one side. Not sure what I'll do yet but in the next few months I'll be doing some kind of monitor upgrade. I have to have a VRR monitor for my main gaming screen though. I think once you have G-Sync for gaming there is no going back.

I can't believe the Iron Beast is retired already! That bench rig is pretty cool even though it's a little "messy" as you put it

Your pictures show up fine and YES, it is much more difficult to make posts, and to post pictures with the new OCN platform About 2/3 of my build log was done with the new system and it's a total pain compared with the old system!


Next up is an overview of my new SteelSeries Acrtis Pro Gaming Wireless Headset


.
08-22-2019 01:59 PM
OCDesign Yes, that looks more like it! The SLI-disabled numbers are much closer in line with the margin I’d expect those finely tuned overclocks to be delivering. Thought the earlier lot looked a little off somehow - underwhelming - given that our systems use the same card.

Must say I’m quite stunned how much the dual-GPU setup is holding both Odyssey and Origins back; I can understand NVLink not helping with something that doesn’t support it, but didn’t expect it to yielding worse performance. (The 39-37 with the 200% silly setting is in margin of error territory can probably be disregarded). Presumably, since it hits both titles but not Tomb Raider or Far Cry, it’s a quirk of the AC game engine?

Anyway, as requested, a quick picture of my monitor setup (spoilered for convenience):

Spoiler!
08-19-2019 11:09 AM
Barefooter
Quote: Originally Posted by Tolkmod View Post
Very nice build, love the detail on not only the case but everything surrounding it. People sometimes forget that part of it
Thank you! Yes the complete package is what really makes it. I just received a new set of wireless headphones that I'll be detailing here soon. Haven't even opened the box yet.


Quote: Originally Posted by OCDesign View Post
The only one I can really comment on - because it is the only game actually installed on here at present - but by chance I happen to be in the middle of replaying Assassin’s Creed Odyssey (to finally put my new-ish kit through its paces), noticed your post and out of curiosity couldn’t resist running the benchmark to compare. Slightly surprised your numbers aren’t higher.

At Ultra-High, x1.0 resolution multiplier, @ 5120x2160 native on my LG 5K centre screen it benches @ 44 FPS. Better in actual gameplay, enough to be perfectly playable – especially given how much of my game time consists of aimlessly wandering around enjoying the scenery…

I don’t use GeForce Experience myself, so the settings are changed manually in-game which may account for it. But turned down to match you at 2560x1440, tests run back-to-back, at each of the graphics pre-sets I get:

  • Low: 96 FPS
  • Medium: 91 FPS
  • High: 80 FPS
  • Very High: 76 FPS
  • Ultra High: 69 FPS
and despite it being an absolute killer

  • Ultra High with maximum resolution modifier (200%): 34 FPS

Performance is a lot less settled however; lower minimums, higher maximums, and all my graphs are consistently much spikier.

Considering this is all on my test bench at the moment (under water but vastly more limited cooling than yours, and therefore the Threadripper & the 2080 Ti XC Ultra are sitting unaltered on their stock out-of-the-box settings), on a monitor setup that is intended for CAD and not gaming, running the two 4K side screens as well as the centre screen on which AC is being played with a fair amount of other minor processes going on, I’d have expected Devastator to be way ahead in its scores?
Thank you for sharing your results. I always enjoy comparisons! That is quite the monitor set-up you have, would love to see a picture of it. I must admit I chuckled to myself that your "side screens" are merely 4K displays... the "low res" monitors of your set-up

Anyway I decided to rerun the Assassin's Creed Odyssey benchmarks without the GeForce Experience so I could match your settings. I think the GeForce experience was setting the Resolution Modifier to a higher setting on some benchmarks. I know for sure it did that with Ghost Recon Wildlands.

So I reran the all of the benchmarks using the in-game settings, and keeping the Resolution Modifier set to 100% except for the final run where I used the 200% setting like you did (yes a FPS killer), then ran through Low, Medium, High, Very High, Ultra High, and finally Ultra High at 200%.

I did find out this week while searching around that turning off SLI in the Nvidia Control Panel actually gives better performance when playing a game without SLI support than leaving it enabled so I gave that a try, and was really surprised that it made a HUGE difference. With SLI enabled the second card gets between 15% to 20% usage and the main card floats between 60% to 70% usage.

With SLI disabled the second card does nothing and the main card stays between 90% and 95% useage and the FPS are dramatically better!

Here's a screen shot of the Afterburner Monitor with SLI disabled.




I put together a spreadsheet showing the FPS with and without SLI enabled. I only ran each benchmark once except for oddly enough with SLI enabled I got one FPS more on the Very High setting as opposed to just the High setting, so I ran that a second time with the same results. Also I actually got two less FPS with SLI disabled when running the 200% Resolution Modifier settings which I also ran a second time with the same results.




I also re-ran Assassin's Creed Origins the only other game I had benchmarked without SLI support and it was the same scenario with far better FPS with SLI disabled. So if you are running SLI and are playing a game that does not support SLI, be sure to disable SLI in the Nvidia Control Panel to maximize your FPS.

Also I could not see any difference at all using the 200% Resolution Modifier, so there is no reason I can see for using that setting.


.
08-15-2019 01:08 PM
OCDesign The only one I can really comment on - because it is the only game actually installed on here at present - but by chance I happen to be in the middle of replaying Assassin’s Creed Odyssey (to finally put my new-ish kit through its paces), noticed your post and out of curiosity couldn’t resist running the benchmark to compare. Slightly surprised your numbers aren’t higher.

At Ultra-High, x1.0 resolution multiplier, @ 5120x2160 native on my LG 5K centre screen it benches @ 44 FPS. Better in actual gameplay, enough to be perfectly playable – especially given how much of my game time consists of aimlessly wandering around enjoying the scenery…

I don’t use GeForce Experience myself, so the settings are changed manually in-game which may account for it. But turned down to match you at 2560x1440, tests run back-to-back, at each of the graphics pre-sets I get:

  • Low: 96 FPS
  • Medium: 91 FPS
  • High: 80 FPS
  • Very High: 76 FPS
  • Ultra High: 69 FPS
and despite it being an absolute killer

  • Ultra High with maximum resolution modifier (200%): 34 FPS

Performance is a lot less settled however; lower minimums, higher maximums, and all my graphs are consistently much spikier.

Considering this is all on my test bench at the moment (under water but vastly more limited cooling than yours, and therefore the Threadripper & the 2080 Ti XC Ultra are sitting unaltered on their stock out-of-the-box settings), on a monitor setup that is intended for CAD and not gaming, running the two 4K side screens as well as the centre screen on which AC is being played with a fair amount of other minor processes going on, I’d have expected Devastator to be way ahead in its scores?
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off