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Thread: [EnGadget] Congress oversight body recommends GDPR-style privacy laws Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
02-23-2019 02:19 PM
xJumper The big companies like Google still violate it anyway and just pay out when caught, or they lawyer up and drag the thing out for ten years. That and most consumers are stupid, even with GDPR style protections they will simply click through and consent to everything for some random service cuz all their friends are on it.
02-22-2019 01:51 PM
miklkit GDPR = bad for hackers and good for hackees. I needed this 3 years ago.
02-21-2019 01:00 PM
Jarhead
Quote: Originally Posted by bigjdubb View Post
How about no. We should deal with the important stuff before we worry about the piddly stuff.





I haven't paid any attention to the GDPR stuff, is it any good? I'm sure whatever they implement here in the US will be a great benefit to the companies collecting and selling the data and be another nail in the coffin for an individuals right to privacy.
EU IP law? Good? No. Really not. As for America, at this point we would be better off with no form of IP protection whether patent or copyright than the system we have now.
02-21-2019 11:33 AM
bigjdubb We aren't exactly known for giving a darn about consumer rights or protections here in the US.
02-21-2019 09:57 AM
miklkit I'll try again.


While this is badly needed it will not be allowed to happen until after the 2020 election, if ever.
02-21-2019 12:49 AM
rdr09 Us Users do bear some, if not, most of responsibility. A person consent is mandatory to joining a social network or service. It only took EU about a month after the Cambridge University fiasco to implement the regulation while the US . . . well, you see how the Users are viewed in this part of the world.
02-20-2019 09:01 PM
Larky_the_mauler
Quote: Originally Posted by bigjdubb View Post
How about no. We should deal with the important stuff before we worry about the piddly stuff.





I haven't paid any attention to the GDPR stuff, is it any good? I'm sure whatever they implement here in the US will be a great benefit to the companies collecting and selling the data and be another nail in the coffin for an individuals right to privacy.
Some pretty good stuff, here's a short summary.
Quote:
Controllers of personal data must put in place appropriate technical and organisational measures to implement the data protection principles. Business processes that handle personal data must be designed and built with consideration of the principles and provide safeguards to protect data (for example, using pseudonymization or full anonymization where appropriate), and use the highest-possible privacy settings by default, so that the data is not available publicly without explicit, informed consent, and cannot be used to identify a subject without additional information stored separately. No personal data may be processed unless it is done under a lawful basis specified by the regulation, or unless the data controller or processor has received an unambiguous and individualized affirmation of consent from the data subject. The data subject has the right to revoke this consent at any time.

A processor of personal data must clearly disclose any data collection, declare the lawful basis and purpose for data processing, and state how long data is being retained and if it is being shared with any third parties or outside of the EEA. Data subjects have the right to request a portable copy of the data collected by a processor in a common format, and the right to have their data erased under certain circumstances.
Actually having regulations for storing data is probably the most important thing, almost every major "hacking" event was because of gross incompetence like storing emails, passwords etc in plaintext in the same database.
02-20-2019 08:26 AM
bigjdubb
Quote: Originally Posted by Jarhead View Post
Make ya a deal, how about we get rid of the DCMA first?
How about no. We should deal with the important stuff before we worry about the piddly stuff.





I haven't paid any attention to the GDPR stuff, is it any good? I'm sure whatever they implement here in the US will be a great benefit to the companies collecting and selling the data and be another nail in the coffin for an individuals right to privacy.
02-19-2019 04:53 PM
Larky_the_mauler
Quote: Originally Posted by JackCY View Post
And what has GDPR changed? Other than having to click a bunch of emails? Oh yes, some websites started to IP lock themselves and throw you a GDPR as a reason and that they do not want to implement anything necessary for it, so to try avoid any potential issue they use IP lock which in itself is laughable because IP doesn't define physical location but hey website admins and lawyers will maybe learn that in 3rd millennium.

GDPR style changes in US... one would have to read carefully the whole laws to even begin to understand all that fine print. Same as it is with GDPR in EU.

Overall more "oversight" of the data hoarding corporations and control given to users over their data is definitely necessary.
Do you even know what GDPR actually is?
02-18-2019 09:36 AM
JackCY And what has GDPR changed? Other than having to click a bunch of emails? Oh yes, some websites started to IP lock themselves and throw you a GDPR as a reason and that they do not want to implement anything necessary for it, so to try avoid any potential issue they use IP lock which in itself is laughable because IP doesn't define physical location but hey website admins and lawyers will maybe learn that in 3rd millennium.

GDPR style changes in US... one would have to read carefully the whole laws to even begin to understand all that fine print. Same as it is with GDPR in EU.

Overall more "oversight" of the data hoarding corporations and control given to users over their data is definitely necessary.
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