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Thread: [Wccftech]Intel Comet Lake-S 10 Core CPUs Allegedly Require New Socket Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
05-17-2019 08:31 PM
Caffinator i'm sitting here on X58 waiting for this socket to finally come out so i can upgrade LOL
05-17-2019 05:37 PM
doritos93
Quote: Originally Posted by Damage Inc View Post
I had bad experience with older mobo's/new chips in the past. E6600 to Q6600 on 780i, lack of GTL voltage that ruined stability. Sandy to Ivy on Z68, no PCI-E 3.0 and native SATA6, I think. Off the top of my head.

I used AMD exclusively from classic Athlon 700 until 4800+ and after that never touched anything AMD so I'm not familiar with AMD sockets.
My point was that if AMD or Intel are capable of prolonging a the packages life then they should instead of going for obvious cash grabs
05-17-2019 04:32 PM
Damage Inc
Quote: Originally Posted by doritos93 View Post
this is a moot point because the board makers make you aware of any and every limitation your chip will have by being put into a older socket. if you cant live with it then YOU buy the new board. there are many that can live without the extra "features", like during the AM2, AM2+, AM3, and AM3+ eras


Modularity of computer components is what makes building fun. I'm guessing you'd advocate binding GPUs to platforms too?
I had bad experience with older mobo's/new chips in the past. E6600 to Q6600 on 780i, lack of GTL voltage that ruined stability. Sandy to Ivy on Z68, no PCI-E 3.0 and native SATA6, I think. Off the top of my head.

I used AMD exclusively from classic Athlon 700 until 4800+ and after that never touched anything AMD so I'm not familiar with AMD sockets.
05-17-2019 03:05 PM
doritos93
Quote: Originally Posted by Damage Inc View Post
New socket? Good. Wouldn't wanna my new chip to be held back by an old mobo that wasn't designed for it. That being said, I would prefer a 6 or 8 core variant to be honest.
this is a moot point because the board makers make you aware of any and every limitation your chip will have by being put into a older socket. if you cant live with it then YOU buy the new board. there are many that can live without the extra "features", like during the AM2, AM2+, AM3, and AM3+ eras


Modularity of computer components is what makes building fun. I'm guessing you'd advocate binding GPUs to platforms too?
05-17-2019 02:50 PM
prjindigo
Quote: Originally Posted by Raghar View Post
Again new socket? C'mon can't we have nice things and when we have 14 nm for 5 years, at least change chipset at most once? Or is it yet another situation when Intel would create new chipset/socket just because, and then find it doesn't have enough manufacturing capacities?
If the new socket requirement came with an additional couple ram channels nobody'd complain... XD

Maybe it's the socket that will finally correctly support 3DxPoint?
05-17-2019 01:43 PM
Damage Inc New socket? Good. Wouldn't wanna my new chip to be held back by an old mobo that wasn't designed for it. That being said, I would prefer a 6 or 8 core variant to be honest.
05-17-2019 01:39 PM
bigjdubb Well I usually move the system I'm replacing to work and take the work system and hand it down to someone. I used to keep parts laying around but I realized that they went mostly unused and it felt like a waste to have them in a box. They were better off being used by someone else than sitting around in a box until they were old enough to be of no use to anyone.

Quote:
I guess the easiest way to put it is that its flexible: If you don't see any value in it, that just says more about your particular strategy for upgrading than anything else in all honesty.
That works both way, you see value in it for you because of your particular upgrade strategy.
05-17-2019 11:47 AM
Brutuz
Quote: Originally Posted by bigjdubb View Post
What do you guys do with your old processors if you don't buy a new motherboard/memory with your new processor?
Sell or store. Either I basically pay a lot less for the new CPU, or I have a chip that works for BIOS updating new boards to run with even newer CPUs, troubleshooting or even as a backup in case my main CPU dies for some reason.

And besides, it's not even just the ability to slot a new CPU into your motherboard: It's also the ability to slot in your old CPU on a new motherboard, sometimes even being able to make the transition to a new DDR generation in the process. For example, if I have $300 for parts and want to upgrade my system right now, I'm FUBAR for anything but value parts due to needing to replace the 3770k, DDR3 and motherboard whereas if I could reuse my old CPU ala the Phenom II chips being able to run both DDR2 and DDR3 then I'd be able to buy a decent motherboard and RAM, then upgrade my CPU later on after saving up more money. I mean, my 3770k isn't ridiculously slow gaming wise and still is workable for the stuff I do outside of gaming, I'd rather hold off until I can afford something that will last me just as long if not longer and the flexibility of say, being able to get onto the new platform and bump my RAM speed/capacity up would actually be quite beneficial.

I guess the easiest way to put it is that its flexible: If you don't see any value in it, that just says more about your particular strategy for upgrading than anything else in all honesty. (ie. "Throw money at the problem" rather than "Maximum Bang for Buck")
Heck, my Mums PC runs an Athlon 200GE and I plan to upgrade her to a 7nm APU later on mainly for the power consumption and improved iGPU at which point the old CPU will go into storage until I can be bothered getting an ITX board and some RAM for a HTPC, something I probably wouldn't do without already owning one of the parts despite that part being so cheap but will be pretty nice to have. (I'd probably go for something cheaper that can still do 1080p video or in-home streaming, as opposed to a chip that I can happily expect to run a handful of games natively with good performance)


And even just X570s newer features look nice for people wanting to just upgrade their board: Got an NVMe SSD already and want a second one but lack an second M.2 slot? Why not wait for X570 given that it's meant to allow 8 PCIe 4.0 lanes specifically for NVMe storage?
05-16-2019 11:22 AM
bigjdubb
Quote: Originally Posted by andydabeast View Post
I may have lost a couple frames compared to going intel but I am super happy with having gone ryzen first gen for my platform upgrade. Three years later I can have the option of doubling my core count (likely) with a chip two generations and a die shrink later on my same mobo. Never purchased an Intel CPU and if they keep this up I never will.
Very true. You could also add another $150 to the mix and take advantage of more of the new processors features with an x570 motherboard. Or add even more money and get higher speed ram along with 2 or 3 NVME drives to feed those cores. Or stick with x370, save a few bucks and have a slightly hamstrung processor. Options are nice.

Intel has never been the platform to choose for saving a few bucks and I doubt they ever will be. I'm sure they will keep up with their 2 generation mobo compatibility (been doing it for quite a while) so you will probably never own an Intel processor. At least now there are more reasons than "saving a few bucks" to get on board with AMD, and hopefully x570 won't be limited to money saving motherboard options like with x370 & x470.
05-16-2019 10:31 AM
andydabeast I may have lost a couple frames compared to going intel but I am super happy with having gone ryzen first gen for my platform upgrade. Three years later I can have the option of doubling my core count (likely) with a chip two generations and a die shrink later on my same mobo. Never purchased an Intel CPU and if they keep this up I never will.
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