Overclock.net - An Overclocking Community - Reply to Topic
Thread: Which hard drive for reliable, long-term storage? Reply to Thread
Title:
Message:

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Overclock.net - An Overclocking Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in


  Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

  Topic Review (Newest First)
10-18-2019 03:16 PM
ACleverName Cheers to Free Fiile sync! Used it for years now, love it.
10-17-2019 04:48 PM
Lady Fitzgerald
Quote: Originally Posted by The Pook View Post
Depends on what you're backing up. Is it non-recoverable or would it just would suck to lose and be a PITA to download everything again?

Minimally, put all your important data elsewhere on a second drive (not RAID 0 and not in the same machine).

If you can't afford to lose anything then do the above and also have an off-site backup solution, either via some Cloud service (if your upload speed is decent) or on a second drive not stored in the same place as your OG drive.

What stuff I can't afford to lose is under 20GB and I back that up in a few places online. The rest is stored on a second drive that I do backups to semi-regularly and it gets stored in my closet when it's not being written to.
My recommendation is similar to The Pook's. I find it simpler to just back up all my data rather than pick and choose. For data, the basic principle (kinda sorta) that Pook and I use is one copy on the computer, a copy on at least one onsite external backup drive, and on at least one offsite external backup drive.

I also recommend keeping data and system files segregated which you apparently do already.For System files (OS and programs; in other words, your C: drive), imaging is best. I recommend Macrium Reflect Free. Apparently, you are already familiar with imaging. Images should be stored on a drive other than one in the computer.

While imaging is needed for backing up system and program files, it's too cumbersome, space wasting, and time consuming for backing up data. For data, I recommend using a folder/file syncing program, such as FreeFileSync or Sync Toy set to Mirror mode (not the same as RAID 1). When updating the backup, the folder/file syncing program will compare the source drive, partition, or folder (the programs treat drives and partitions as folders) with the backup drive, then will copy any folders and files on the source drive that are not on the backup drive to the backup drive. Any folders and files on the backup drive that are not on the source drive will be deleted from the backup drive. The result is essentially a copy of the source drive.

Another feature on the better folder/file syncing programs is called Versioning. When enabled (which I strongly recommend), files deleted when updating are sent to a user defined Versioning drive or folder.

After the initial backup (which will take a while), updates will take much less time since only files that are new, changed, deleted are involved.

It sounds complicated but, once set up, it's really easy and fast to use.
10-17-2019 01:39 PM
The Pook Depends on what you're backing up. Is it non-recoverable or would it just would suck to lose and be a PITA to download everything again?

Minimally, put all your important data elsewhere on a second drive (not RAID 1 and not in the same machine).

If you can't afford to lose anything then do the above and also have an off-site backup solution, either via some Cloud service (if your upload speed is decent) or on a second drive not stored in the same place as your OG drive.

What stuff I can't afford to lose is under 20GB and I back that up in a few places online. The rest is stored on a second drive that I do backups to semi-regularly and it gets stored in my closet when it's not being written to.
10-17-2019 01:03 PM
ahnafakeef Okay, I'll bite. Can someone please take the trouble of briefly explaining my options and procedure for safely backing up my data? I need to understand the expenditure involved and evaluate whether a financially viable option exists that I can avail right now.
10-17-2019 11:46 AM
GanjaSMK "However, all this excessive concern over drive reliability is moot since drive reliability is not the major point one should consider if one wants to ensure the safety of their data. All drives, no matter their brand, model, or even age (including brand new and "ancient" ones), are subject to irrecoverable failure at any time with little or no warning and anyone who relies on drive reliability to protect their data is playing Russian Roulette with their data. The ONLY way to reasonably ensure one's data is safe is for it to exist in at least three separate places. The most basic form of this is on a computer, on an onsite external backup drive, and on an offsite external backup drive. Since drive failure is not the only way data can be lost, having backups has the added advantage of protecting data from far more than just drive failure. For a drive to be a backup drive, it MUST be kept powered down and disconnected from power, disconnected from the computer, and stored out of sight of the computer except while updating the backup." -Lady Fitzgerald

This is very, very true. Outside of individual experiences, or reporting from any enterprise or company, the old standard still rings true - having important data (irreplaceable) stored in (3) separate locations, both physically and objectively, is the best practice for data backup. Whether for personal, business, government or otherwise. FWIW.

And that said, I still throw my vote for Western Digital. :-)
10-17-2019 10:42 AM
Fluxmaven
Quote: Originally Posted by ciarlatano View Post
Totally agree. I've lost a number of drives that couldn't have a single byte of data recovered....all Seagate, BTW.

I may be prejudiced by a number of past experiences, but I don't trust Seagate at all, and my dealings with their customer service has been as huge step below that of WD.

I also feel like the Toshiba drives don't get enough attention. I have yet to use one myself, but reliability stats and user reports on them are always stellar. Should I have a need for another mechanical storage drive in the future, I will be going the Toshiba route.
I agree that the Toshiba drives deserve more attention. I think people may be turned off by them based on experience with Toshiba computers (which tend to be low end crap), but their drives seem to be really great. I typically buy WD drives since I have also had less than stellar experiences with Seagate, but as I expand my Plex server, I will probably grab a couple more Toshiba's.
10-17-2019 08:18 AM
Lady Fitzgerald
Quote: Originally Posted by fragamemnon View Post
While you are correct, I believe OP specifically said he will not be backing up the data for now, so suggesting backup solutions is out of the scope of this thread. We are discussing drives and their reliability.
Again, data safety and drive reliability are not synonymous. Also, the OP is suggesting he believes RAID or a NAS are the same as backups, which they are rarely are. Whenever adding storage space, backups should always be part of the equation. Whenever setting a budget for drives to go into a computer, backup drives should also be part of that budget. Not having backups "for now" is putting any data put onto the new drive at risk for loss. it's like buying an expensive car and not having enough money left to properly maintain it and/or insure it; one accident and your investment is toast (not to mention possible liability) or the car dies prematurely due to a lack of maintenance.

When one allows for a solid backup scheme from the get-go, drive reliability becomes somewhat less of a concern allowing for more flexibility in choosing drives.
10-17-2019 07:38 AM
NewUser16
Quote: Originally Posted by Lady Fitzgerald View Post
I wouldn't use a free data recovery option as a point of consideration when selecting a drive (other than, maybe, an indication of confidence in the drive by the manufacturer). Not all drives that fail can have data recovered from them. Data recovery is a crap shoot at best. It's far safer and much more reliable to have a solid backup scheme in place rather than to depend on data recovery to recover lost data.
Very good point.
10-17-2019 07:11 AM
fragamemnon
Quote: Originally Posted by Lady Fitzgerald View Post
I wouldn't use a free data recovery option as a point of consideration when selecting a drive (other than, maybe, an indication of confidence in the drive by the manufacturer). Not all drives that fail can have data recovered from them. Data recovery is a crap shoot at best. It's far safer and much more reliable to have a solid backup scheme in place rather than to depend on data recovery to recover lost data.

While you are correct, I believe OP specifically said he will not be backing up the data for now, so suggesting backup solutions is out of the scope of this thread. We are discussing drives and their reliability.
10-17-2019 07:06 AM
ciarlatano
Quote: Originally Posted by Lady Fitzgerald View Post
I wouldn't use a free data recovery option as a point of consideration when selecting a drive (other than, maybe, an indication of confidence in the drive by the manufacturer). Not all drives that fail can have data recovered from them. Data recovery is a crap shoot at best. It's far safer and much more reliable to have a solid backup scheme in place rather than to depend on data recovery to recover lost data.
Totally agree. I've lost a number of drives that couldn't have a single byte of data recovered....all Seagate, BTW.

I may be prejudiced by a number of past experiences, but I don't trust Seagate at all, and my dealings with their customer service has been as huge step below that of WD.

I also feel like the Toshiba drives don't get enough attention. I have yet to use one myself, but reliability stats and user reports on them are always stellar. Should I have a need for another mechanical storage drive in the future, I will be going the Toshiba route.
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off