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-   -   Subwoofer near computer case, what's the real risk? (https://www.overclock.net/forum/18-sound-cards-computer-audio/1398207-subwoofer-near-computer-case-whats-real-risk.html)

schmotty 06-06-2013 12:55 PM

Put a piece of sheet metal between the sub and the case and it should be fine. Especially if your case is metal.

TwoCables 06-06-2013 05:47 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Masta Squidge View Post

This myth is absurd. You people do realize there are brutally strong magnets inside hard drives right?

One could make the argument that the A/C speaker coil might cause a problem, but the magnetic field is FAR too weak to do anything. Even an unshielded speaker has to be just a couple inches from a CRT to affect it, and that my friends is the ONLY reason to buy shielded speakers in the first place.

Shielding in speakers originates from the CRT era, when speakers were places directly next to the screens, in some cases attached to them, and unshielded ones would cause all sorts of funky colors on the display. It has nothing to do with your hard drive.

 

Yeah, but we're talking about a powered subwoofer. There's a big difference.


Masta Squidge 06-06-2013 06:06 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoCables View Post

Yeah, but we're talking about a powered subwoofer. There's a big difference.
No, there isn't.

A powered sub has an amp and a speaker in it. The most dangerous thing in the assembly is the voice coil, and it isn't a problem. An amplifier is no different in terms of emissions than any other component in your pc.


You can feel free to put your external hard drive directly on top of logitech's 500 watt powered speaker setup and you will never have a problem.

I'm telling you, this whole speaker thing is a myth.

Lombax 06-06-2013 06:08 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoCables View Post

All I've ever heard over the years is if a subwoofer or speaker is not magnetically shielded, then it should be kept at least 2 feet away from magnetic things like hard drive.

I actually believe this is for the benefit of the subwoofer, for more accurate sound reproduction.

Think, if it was close to something metal, the magnet might try to "pull" that direction, resulting in a loss of precision.

Masta Squidge 06-06-2013 06:13 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lombax View Post

I actually believe this is for the benefit of the subwoofer, for more accurate sound reproduction.

Think, if it was close to something metal, the magnet might try to "pull" that direction, resulting in a loss of precision.
You guys have no idea how rapidly magnetic fields lose strength do you? Magnetic fields lose strength extraordinarily quickly. Over the space of just a few inches, even the massive magnets on the backs of high powered speakers lose so much of their strength that the earths magnetic field is more powerful. You can build an enclosure out of nothing but steel, and it wont affect the sound quality at all, barring the obvious resonance problems of the actual case.

TwoCables 06-06-2013 06:14 PM

The manual for my speaker system (Altec Lansing VS4121) says that my subwoofer is not shielded and therefore I should keep it at least 2 feet away from magnetic things like hard drives. It doesn't say why, it just says to keep a distance.

 

So if this is a myth, then why is it in my manual?


Masta Squidge 06-06-2013 06:16 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoCables View Post

The manual for my speaker system (Altec Lansing VS4121) says that my subwoofer is not shielded and therefore I should keep it at least 2 feet away from magnetic things like hard drives. It doesn't say why, it just says to keep a distance.

So if this is a myth, then why is it in my manual?
Because it is such a well known myth that they don't want anyone blaming them for their **** breaking.

I promise you can put a hard drive right on top of a powered sub and it will function just fine for years. I had no other place to put mine, and until recently when I moved, the thing sat there for 5 years without a single problem.

Masta Squidge 06-06-2013 06:20 PM

The only time you have a problem with magnets and hard drives is when they are actively writing data, you put a magnet to the drive, and it pulls the read/write arms into contact with the platter... and poof, drive is messed up.

You still have to be within an inch for this to even occur, and be using a particularly strong magnet, like the ones already inside of the damn drive. There are stupidly powerful little magnets inside hard drives dude. Even their fields, within a half inch of the platter, isn't enough to corrupt the data that is on the disc.

Lombax 06-06-2013 06:22 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Masta Squidge View Post

You guys have no idea how rapidly magnetic fields lose strength do you? Magnetic fields lose strength extraordinarily quickly. Over the space of just a few inches, even the massive magnets on the backs of high powered speakers lose so much of their strength that the earths magnetic field is more powerful. You can build an enclosure out of nothing but steel, and it wont affect the sound quality at all, barring the obvious resonance problems of the actual case.

Yes, its exponential. 2 feet is pushing it, but I can tell you that the subs that I installed in my car would attract things over 1 foot away. and would pull hard towards metal that was like 4-6 inches away. Which is why they came double-boxed where the outer box was big enough for a 10 year old to completely hide in.

But those were 15's.....

Masta Squidge 06-06-2013 06:22 PM

http://www.pcworld.com/article/116572/article.html

Quote:
For venerable floppies, this statement holds true. We placed a 99-cent magnet on a 3.5-inch floppy for a few seconds. The magnet stuck to the disk and ruined its data.

That combined with the CRT thing is where this myth comes from.
Quote:
Fortunately, most modern storage devices, such as SD and CompactFlash memory cards, are immune to magnetic fields. "There's nothing magnetic in flash memory, so [a magnet] won't do anything," says Bill Frank, executive director of the CompactFlash Association. "A magnet powerful enough to disturb the electrons in flash would be powerful enough to suck the iron out of your blood cells," says Frank.

The same goes for hard drives. The only magnets powerful enough to scrub data from a drive platter are laboratory degaussers or those used by government agencies to wipe bits off media. "In the real world, people are not losing data from magnets," says Bill Rudock, a tech-support engineer with hard-drive maker Seagate. "In every disk," notes Rudock, "there's one heck of a magnet that swings the head."


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