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-   -   HELIOS - ASSEMBLED 2015-SEP-06 - (Caselabs SMH10 | Black/Copper | EVGA SR-2 Black Edition) (https://www.overclock.net/forum/18082-builds-logs-case-mods/1405988-helios-assembled-2015-sep-06-caselabs-smh10-black-copper-evga-sr-2-black-edition.html)

alpenwasser 07-01-2013 03:10 PM

w600


Table of Contents

Note: For those posts which are retroactive, the date reflects the date of
the post, not the date when I did the corresponding work.


01. 2013-JUL-01: The SMH10 - Unboxing and Assembly
02. 2013-JUL-01: Radiators
03. 2013-JUL-01: PSU & Pump Mounting, Making the 24 Pin Cable
04. 2013-JUL-06: What 40 Hours of Cabling Will Get You...
05. 2013-JUL-18: Various Small Bits
06. 2013-JUL-22: A Copper Face Plate for the Lamptron FC5V2
07. 2013-JUL-25: The Aqua Computer Aqualis Copper Edition
08. 2013-JUL-29: Interlude: A Retroactive Build Log on My Previous Build, ZEUS
09. 2013-SEP-14: Prototype: The Bitfenix Spectre Pro Copper Edition
10. 2013-SEP-15: Painting the M/B Block Screws
11. 2013-SEP-20: Fan Disassembly: How-To
12. 2013-SEP-22: Quick and Messy Status Shots
13. 2013-SEP-23: The Bitfenix Spectre Pro Copper Edition (cont.)
14. 2013-SEP-23: Copper Paint vs. Actual Copper: A Comparison
15. 2013-OCT-01: Colour-Coordinating the Kryographics Titan
16. 2013-OCT-08: Loop Planning
17. 2013-OCT-09: Colour-Coordinating the Raystorms
18. 2013-OCT-13: Deciding on a Backplate, Small M/B Teaser
19. 2013-OCT-13: The EVGA SR-2 Black Editon
20. 2013-OCT-28: Requesting Opinions on Fittings...
21. 2013-OCT-29: Colour-Coordinating the RAM Blocks
22. 2015-SEP-03: Finally, Progress!
23. 2015-SEP-06: Assembled




Current Status


aw--helios--2015-09-06--27--overview-front-side.jpeg
aw--helios--2015-09-06--28--overview-front-side.jpeg
aw--helios--2015-09-06--29--overview-back-side.jpeg
Prologue


Hello everybody. smile.gif

I hope I've put this in the right sub-forum.

Many, many years ago I first came across OCN, but since I was out of the
PC building game for a few years (military, college, bad health) I only got back
into it earlier this year, and finally decided to join up here.

A very short introduction: 27 years old, male, Swiss, finished high school
in 2005, army 2005~2007 (Lt, infantry), worked in Logistics and accounting
2007~2008, studied mechanical engineering 2008~2012. Unfortunately
I was befallen by bad health for extended periods of time during my studies
(nothing life-threatening, but it did prevent me from working for college as
much as I should have) and had to drop out last summer (I will be starting
a degree in electrical engineering next September if all goes according to
plan though).

Since then I've been recuperation (still one more operation required next
August) and did some web development work from home. Finally, this spring
I had the money and time to start putting together a rig which I'd been planning
for a very long time.

Yes, yes, I'm aware: The SR-2 is old news by now. Originally I started putting this
build together in late summer 2011. Shortly afterwards, everything was put on
halt due to health troubles. After it became clear that the pause was going to
be significantly longer than expected, I considered selling off the hardware I had
already bought (the SR-2 among it), since being ill is not exactly cheap for a college
student, even in a country with mandatory health insurance.

However, I still would have made a significant loss, and I just have an inherent
weak spot for dual CPU systems, so I persisted. And this spring I finally had the
money to start buying the remaining components.

The good thing about having to wait this long is that in the meantime, Caselabs
had come out with pretty much the perfect case for my plans: The SMH10.
Originally, it was going to be a scratchbuild. The case I would have made myself
would have been quite similar in layout to the SMH10, also built from aluminium
(2 mm ~ 3 mm). But naturally, it's rather difficult to manufacture something of
similar quality with only the basic DIY tools, and if I had bought the tools
needed for making my own awesome case it would have cost about the same if not
slightly more than an SMH10, so I just went for that instead.

I'm still far off from getting everything I need, so this will take some time to
complete (I hope to be done some time in summer).

Before anyone thinks I'm a millionaire or something: I worked before I went
to college. I've been working since I had to drop out last summer/fall.
Besides that, I'm rather frugal with most other things in my life. So this build
is mostly the result of hard work, dedication and lots and lots of patience.
No miracles were worked and no cheat codes used. smile.gif


The Name

Hysterical Excess Labouring Independently Of Sanity, aka HELIOS.

Because: It's been going on for almost two years. And I am definitely starting
to question my sanity.

Also: I've been naming my PC's after Greek deities since forever. The first PC I
built was an AMD Thunderbird C 1.4 GHz machine back in 2001, which lasted me for
a few years, and it was called Helios (I use the name as the PC's host name
within our network, for those wondering what practical use it has).

It died a fiery death at the hands of a water cooling accident: Using the Eheim
1048 I had been befallen by the rattling pump wheel. Naturally, I wrapped some
tape around the axle which solved that problem. Unfortunately, the tape became
brittle over time and eventually, a piece of tape broke off and clogged the
loop. Killed the flow, cooked the CPU (no overheating protection back then).

After that, I took that name out of use, until now. It's time for a revival.


The Inspiration

For the most part, PrometheusCU. I'm sure many of you are familiar with it,
and those who aren't: Go read it, now! I'll wait a few days.

Sadly, its creator passed on and never finished it (it did go to a friend of his,
but no activity since last summer, at least not in the original thread frown.gif).
I don't nearly have his set of skills and/or tools, but that doesn't change
the inspiration part.


Main PC Guts

As a side note: The computing power of this rig will mostly go to BOINC (I might
use it for gaming from time to time, we shall see). If [email protected] ever get their stuff
together with regards to GPU folding on Linux (highly unlikely frown.gif ), I might
switch over to folding again, since I'd been doing that for about 18 months
before switching to BOINC due to the GPU problem (and a few other niggles I
have with the project's behavior towards its donors).

The O/S will most likely be Arch Linux (since I've been using that for about two
years now and am quite comfortable with it), or if I feel experimental Gentoo or
even FreeBSD. Certainly not Windows. I need my xterm and Z shell and UNIX
utilities.

Anyway:
  • M/B: EVGA SR-2
  • CPU: 2 x Xeon x5680 (not ES, normal retail version, got them for half price
    on eBay, brand spanking new)
  • RAM: 24 GB of Corsair Dominator 1866
  • GPU: 1 x Geforce Titan (should do well at computing)
  • SSD: Intel 520 120 GB
  • HDD: TBD
  • PSU: Enermax Platimax 1200 W (don't need that much power, but the
    weaker models aren't fully modular, more reasoning for my decision later on)
  • Case: Caselabs SMH10, reverse ATX layout, obviously in black

W/C parts

Well, of course it will be under water!. In fact, all my PC's for the last 12 years
have had to get wet.
  • CPU blocks: XSPC Raystorm Copper Edition
  • GPU block: Probably the Aquacomputer Titan block in copper with
    the acrylic top. Haven't ordered it yet though, so this might still change.
  • RAM blocks: Alphacool Dominator water blocks in copper with plexi
    tops. Yes, cooling your RAM with water is absolutely unnecessary.
    I just like how it looks.
  • M/B block: MIPS SR-2 block in Acetal/Copper
  • Pumps: 2 x Aquacomputer D5 without Aquabus
  • Pump tops: 2 x Alphacool D5 pump tops in Acetal
  • Reservoir: Aquacomputer Aqualis Pro
  • Radiators: 2 x Hardware Labs SR-1 560 + 1 x Alphacool NexXxoS XT45
    Full Copper 480 (that's ~14.89 120mm single radiators, for those
    wondering).
  • Fans: For the moment, Bitfenix Spectre Pros in 140 mm and 120 mm,
    respectively. Some people seem to be having bearing troubles, if that
    happens, I will probably go for some Noctuas.
  • Fan and Pump Controller:Lamptron FC5v2
  • Flow Meter and Display: Koolance INS-FM17N with the DCB-FM01
    as its display. I know flow monitoring isn't really necessary, and the
    Koolance flow meter doesn't really look good. This is mostly about satisfying
    my curiosity, and there's enough places in the SMH10 where I can hide the
    display and the sensor so that it doesn't uglify the build.
  • Fittings: 16/10 mm compression fittings, Alphacool shiny copper and
    possibly also in black
  • Tubing: 15 mm OD copper tubing (possibly some normal 16/10 tubing
    in some parts, to be determined). And yes, I have figured out a way to fit
    15mm OD tubing into 16/10 compression fittings and getting it watertight
    (at least according to first tests, let's hope it keeps working).


Although I started this build a few months ago (some may already have seen it
in other places) it is still very much an ongoing project and will be for quite a
while. I will be catching this log up to date over the coming few days.

So, for those who have not been deterred by my introductory novella, let's
get to it. smile.gif

alpenwasser 07-01-2013 03:15 PM

The SMH10

I ordered it flat-packed. Shipping to Switzerland was ~150 USD and it took 13
days from order confirmation until arrival. Jim was very helpful with advice and
making sure what I ordered made sense smile.gif.


The Box

(click image for full res)
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Unpacking the Goodies

(click image for full res)
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Guarding the Loot

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Always Use Protection (a thick wool blanket in this case)

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Ready, Set, Go!

(click image for full res)
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First Steps

(click image for full res)
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Getting There...

(click image for full res)
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Uh Oh! redface.gif

The 3.5" HDD cage collided with the tie down points. I wrote to Caselabs and
sent them a pic. They promptly responded saying they were trying to figure out
what had gone wrong.

After a few days Kevin wrote back to me saying that my main compartment divider
(the big vertical plate in the main chamber) had accidentally been manufactured
to an old spec and that they were going to send me a new one.

This actually worked out quite well because I'd forgotten a few small parts in
my first order for which I now didn't have to pay shipping smile.gif.

Mistakes happen, what matters to me is how they are handled and Caselabs'
customer service left nothing to be desired in this case.

(click image for full res)
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Tada!

(click image for full res)
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Out of Curiosity

(click image for full res)
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A Fine Detail I noticed

The threads for mounting the acrylic window and the HDD cages are done like
this. You barely notice them. No fiddling around with screws. Just use the
provided flange nut driver (which is a very nice one btw) and mount the nuts
over the threads. Much more comfortable than screws. Very nice!

(click image for full res)
w800

alpenwasser 07-01-2013 03:21 PM

Radiators

As mentioned, I will be using two Hardware Labs SR-1 560's and one
Alphacool XT45 480, or the equivalent of ~14.89 120 mm single rads.
Both the SR-1 and the XT45 are excellent at the low fans speeds I will
be using, according to Martin's Liquid Lab (SR-1 review, XT45 review).


Group Shot

Isn't that 480 just cute?

Click image for full res
w800


GTX 560

There was mistake in my shipment of the SR-1's. I got the GTX560's instead.
Had I kept them, I would have saved around 50 CHF (~41 EUR, 37 GBP).
However, according to Martin's review, they are only really useful for high
power fans, which is not at all what I intend to run.

Nonetheless, they are a stunning piece of workmanship, so I took a few pics
before sending them back.

Click image for full res
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Click image for full res
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SR-1

After a little while, I got what I had ordered:

Click image for full res
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SR-1: Longitudinal Shot

The fins on this rad are just about perfect smile.gif

Click image for full res
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Fin Detail

Creating more turbulence (for better heat exchange) and preventing dust
buildup (according to HW Labs' PR).

Click image for full res
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Alphacool XT45

Click image for full res
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Alphacool XT45: Fin Detail

The fins are structured not as excessively as the SR-1's, but judging from performance, it's still enough wink.gif

Click image for full res
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Bottom Radiator Assembly: Components, Revision 1

The 560's will go into the bottom compartment, while the 480 will be in
the case's top.

Click image for full res
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SR-1: Nylon Screws

I ordered some black Nylon M4 hex bolts (to dampen the fans' vibrations).
I knew it was going to be a tight fit (maximum length they were available
in was 30 mm), but I had to try.

Also, I very much like the fact that the SR-1 is using M4 threads smile.gif.

Click image for full res
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SR-1: Slightly Recessed Threads

I could just about get the screws into most of the threads through the
Caselabs radiator mount. Unfortunately, the threads on the SR-1 are slightly
recessed. Getting a gasket in between was going to be impossible (and
I could only mount about 10 of the 16 screws per assembly).

And since the SR-1 uses 20 mm distance between fan threads, I was going
to need a gasket.

Click image for full res
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Longer Bolts, Plus Gasket

I ordered some 40 mm hex bolts and some Phobya radiator gasket tape.
Let's try this again smile.gif

Click image for full res
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Fan Bolts Cutouts

Click image for full res
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One Side Done

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Sealing Gaps

The SR-1 has 20 mm spacing, so there's a gap between fans.

Click image for full res
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Radiator Assembly, Revision 2

I will spray paint the bolts with copper later on.
But the painting phase is not quite here yet.

Click image for full res
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Small Oversight

Can't have this:

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Correction

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No Puncturing

The SR-1 has a 15 mm inbuilt shroud on one side. So there's plenty of room
for those 40 mm screws.

Click image for full res
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alpenwasser 07-01-2013 03:30 PM

PSU & Pump Mount, Making the 24 Pin cable


I will be using mostly 16 AWG Silicone wires, which have a few advantages over normal PVC wires,
as well as one major disadvantage and one minor one. The minor one is cost; it is actually quite
expensive. 10 meters of 16 AWG wire cost ~ 7.75 GBP (~12 USD).

The PSU


Not much to say here, it's just an absolute stunner.

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-06-16--01--platimax-1200w.jpeg


This is how it's mounted to the plate. There's also a cutout to fit the 230 V connector through
and to access the ON/OFF button.

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-06-16--02--platimax-1200w-standoffs.jpeg


The pumps are bolted to the same plate. Makes for a nice and compact unit. smile.gif

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-06-16--03--psu-and-pump-plate.jpeg


And inside the case:

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-06-16--04--psu-and-pump-plate-mounted.jpeg


Making the 24 Pin


Advantages of Silicone wire: It's extremely flexible and can tolerate much higher temperatures
(this one is rated to 200 C). The temperature thing might sound a bit silly for a PC, but it
actually came in very handy during making the wires.


The tools I used (courtesy of Lutro0 for the most part):

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-06-16--05--cable-tools.jpeg


Stripping the wire in preparation for crimping. You can clearly see that there are an insane
amount of strands, which is the other aspect that makes this wire so much more flexible than
PVC coated one (besides the Silicone, obviously). The disadvantage of this is that the wire
itself is substantially thicker than its PVC counterpart, coming in at a bulky 3.1 mm diameter
for a 16 AWG wire. The 16 AWG PVC wires that came with my PSU measure about 2.0 mm in
comparison.

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-06-16--06--stripping.jpeg


The thickness of the wire requires me to press the crimp terminal onto the wire and then
insert that assembly into the crimper, instead of first fixing the terminal inside the crimper,
inserting the wire into that and then pressing down.

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-06-16--07--terminal-fitting.jpeg


Luckily, Silicone is very soft, meaning it compresses nicely under the crimping terminal's wings.
Be careful though: There are (at least) two versions of this terminal floating around: One with
longer wings and one with shorter wings. The short winged version is completely unusable for
this setup. As you can see, this is not a flawless crimp, but the insulation does not come below
the second pair of wings, which I deem good enough for my purposes (otherwise I'd have an insane
amount of wasted crimp terminals wink.gif). Still, despite all this, the rate of failed crimps does
noticeably rise when using such a thick wire. The most common fault I encounter is that one of the
rear wings breaks of (the ones which are supposed to crimp down on the insulation).

Fortunately the core's large thickness due to the many strands makes most of these still perfectly
usable since the forward pair of wings hold the wire in place quite tightly (much more tightly than
if you had a rear wing failure with a PVC wire), in fact it takes an enormous amount of force to
rip off the crimp terminal (I've tried a few times to test the blemished crimps).

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-06-16--08--terminal-crimped.jpeg


The indispensable sleeving tool:

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-06-16--09--sleeving-tool.jpeg


And with the paracord sleeve. Note that I haven't melted the ends, which is on purpose. Melted
paracord becomes quite hard, which doesn't work for what I'm doing here.

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-06-16--10--sleeve-fitted.jpeg


Distance gauge for what comes below.

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-06-16--11--gauge.jpeg


And here we have the trick to the problem of thick wires. Since the wires are much too
thick to fit into the connector with a sleeve on them (they do fit easily without one),
I had to come up with another solution than the usual one of melting the sleeve onto
the crimp terminal.

Since I absolutely wanted to avoid using heat shrink I came up with this solution. If you
have a look above at all the things I used for this, you will notice a roll of 0.25 mm Nylon
thread. I took that thread and wound it around the wire's ends, making sure to have the right
distance from the crimp connector's end to the Nylon thread and that each Nylon piece had
the exact same number of windings (20). This is also why the paracord is not melted before;
keeping it unmelted and soft makes it possible to tighten down the Nylon thread much more
firmly.

The advantages of this technique are that it looks much better than heat shrink (at least to
me, which is what matters), and since you can tighten it down very nicely, it also holds the
paracord sleeve in place much better than an equal length piece of heat shrink. Also, this
nicely avoids those "steps" one often has to have when using heat shrink. The downside
of this approach is that it takes an absolutely ridiculous amount of time to do.

Doing this one wire you see here took me 30 minutes (including taking the pics). Without
taking pictures I usually need around 15~20 minutes for one wire, and up to 45 minutes for a
doubly crimped one (of which there are five in the 24 pin cable, an absolute nightmare).

All in all, the 24 pin cable has taken me around 12 hours of work so far.

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-06-16--12--threads.jpeg


This is where the heat resistance of Silicone comes in handy. Taking the extra paracord
off with a heated box cutter (as in glowing red) nicely terminates the whole thing and
secures it to the wire, while leaving the Silicone undamaged. I've tried this with PVC and
the hot blade easily melts through the insulation if I do things identically to this.

However, one needs to be careful not to accidentally touch the Nylon cord with the heated
blade, or else the Nylon will come undone and has to be redone (happened four times during
the 24 pin assembly).

This is where I was presented with another problem: No matter how perfectly well placed the
sleeve's ends are, there will always be a bit of unwanted colour at the end. Therefore, this
needs to be painted (well, needs is a relative term).

Oh, and in case anyone's wondering: They didn't have black wire in 16 AWG in stock and I
really didn't feel like waiting a few weeks for that. Since you can't see through paracord
this isn't hugely important.

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-06-16--13--unwanted-colour.jpeg


Also see here:

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-06-16--14--fits.jpeg


Another wire in its painted state, this time with black sleeving. The black is a bit more
forgiving of errors (sand colour is not at all), however it's also quite a bit trickier to
see what's going on. I apologize for the blurry picture, it's quite a heavy magnification
so I didn't realize this until it was too late.

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-06-16--15--ends-painted.jpeg


And finally, the 24 pin before mounting it in the case and lacing it.

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-06-16--16--24pin.jpeg


And after mounting it and lacing it for a few hours:

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-06-21--02--24pin.jpeg


Also, the CPU0 power cables:

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-06-21--01--cpu0-power.jpeg

Inglewood78 07-01-2013 03:30 PM

Subbed for some copper tube goodness!

alpenwasser 07-01-2013 03:39 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Inglewood78 View Post

Subbed for some copper tube goodness!

Hehe, that will be the next big challenge to solve: Bending the copper tubes so that it all
comes together nicely.

Cable-wise I still have to do the CPU1 power cables, the PCI-E aux cable on the M/B as well
as the cooling system (pumps, fans etc.). I must admit I'll be very glad once that's finally done.
Making your own cables is fun and all, but in the end I'll probably have spend about 30 to 50
hours on making cables and doing cable management, so I'll be good for a while. rolleyes.gif

After that I'll get busy with the copper tubing. I'll probably have to make my own bending
apparatus because I haven't been able to find a 15 mm bender that doesn't cost an arm
and a leg (plus, all the ones I've been able to find have bend radii which are way too large
for my purposes, I need to find the tightest radius which doesn't ruin my pipes).

Thanks for the sub! smile.gif

pcmonky 07-01-2013 03:40 PM

Finally, some smh10 love. I will be ordering my smh10 in 3 days.

There are hardly any smh10 builds.

Looking forward to this thumb.gif

alpenwasser 07-01-2013 03:47 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by pcmonky View Post

Finally, some smh10 love. I will be ordering my smh10 in 3 days.

There are hardly any smh10 builds.

Looking forward to this thumb.gif

Yeah, I've seen quite a few STH10 builds, but no SMH10's. Sure, the STH10 is a great case, but IMO the
proportions of the SMH10 are much more pleasing to the eye. The STH10 is just way too high and narrow for
my tastes. Now, of course I won't begrudge anyone the choice to use the STH10 (it is a great case, after all),
but I didn't really need the additional space in that, and I just love the SMH10. smile.gif

47 Knucklehead 07-01-2013 03:51 PM

Very nice build.

I love the name ... that is the name of my 32' World Cat boat.

alpenwasser 07-01-2013 03:54 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by 47 Knucklehead View Post

Very nice build.

I love the name ... that is the name of my 32' World Cat boat.

Thank you! smile.gif

The original HELIOS was actually named after the AI in the first Deus Ex game (loved that game, still
do in fact). Boats? Sometimes I wish we had an ocean adjacent to Switzerland...

Barefooter 07-01-2013 04:35 PM

Subbed for this one. I really like your cable stitching. Nice job!

TPE-331 07-01-2013 09:26 PM

Subbed. I'm going to follow this one through. smile.gif

alpenwasser 07-02-2013 03:55 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Barefooter View Post

Subbed for this one. I really like your cable stitching. Nice job!

Thanks! smile.gif

It took me a while to figure out since cable lacing is not really as common as it used
to be (the curse of zip ties rolleyes.gif ), and information is therefore relatively scarce,
but with the help of a few videos and some reference manuals by NASA and a few other
sources I finally arrived at this version. I had also looked at Frank's version, which is
pretty damn awesome, but it just took me forever to do and since I have many cables
in my build which will be visible (and therefore need to be laced) I decided to try if I
could simplify things a bit and find a technique that was a tad faster while still providing
me with the desired look.

I've actually made a tutorial on this. The audio is a bit on the low side (I'll fix that
in future vids), but it should be easy enough to follow.
Quote:
Originally Posted by TPE-331 View Post

Subbed. I'm going to follow this one through. smile.gif

Thanks! smile.gif

EDIT: Forgot: I just got the crimp terminals I've ordered form Lutro0, so I will
be doing most of the remaining cables this week and should have an update on the
major cabling by the end of the week.

Beakz 07-05-2013 01:49 AM

Subbed! Good luck with school and the build biggrin.gif

alpenwasser 07-05-2013 02:09 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Beakz View Post

Subbed! Good luck with school and the build biggrin.gif

Hehe, thanks man, I appreciate that. smile.gif I'm currently doing the last primary power cables,
so I should have an update on that by tomorrow or Sunday, depending on how much
real life interferes. biggrin.gif

Beakz 07-05-2013 01:02 PM

Great can't wait! thumb.gif

alpenwasser 07-06-2013 04:03 AM

Major Power Cables Finished


So, this is what about 40 hours of cabling have gotten me: One 24 pin, two EPS 8 pins,
one PCI-E 8 pin and four PCI-E 6 pins. I'm not completely done with them (I need to
reinforce the 24 pin's lacing a bit), but the main part is done when it comes to power
cables.

The GPU Cable

This is what the GPU cable looked like before lacing.
(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-06--01--GPU-cable.jpeg


CPU1 + PCI-E Aux

These are the cables for the CPU1 power delivery (8 pin EPS + 6 pin PCI-E) and the SR-2's
PCI-E auxiliary 6 pin for the PCI-E slots themselves. Makes for 20 wires in total. First I crimped
their M/B terminals:

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-06--02--CPU1-PCIE-aux-wires.jpeg


After that I colour-coded them to know which pair of wires needed to be sleeved with which
paracord colour. Doing that 20 wire cable is pretty much the only thing I did this week. All in
all it was about 15 hours of work (cutting, crimping, sleeving, lacing). The PSU side crimps
were only crimped onto the wires once the whole harness had been laced so that the
wires had the right length (obviously the outer wires in the bends will have to be longer).

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-06--03--CPU1-PCIE-aux-colour-coding.jpeg


Main Cables

And these are most of the major power cables. What's missing here is the GPU power delivery
because I'd already tied that to the case when I took this picture. As you can see the cables
are all stuck together because of the way I had to do the PSU side of things. How I organize
the PSU connectors is determined by the PSU's power rail design and connector layout.

The harness is surprisingly stiff (considering Silicone wire is very floppy) and holds its shape
pretty well with all the lacing.

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-06--04--main-cables.jpeg


Mounted


And this is how the whole harness looks when it's mounted into the case. The messy bit above
the PSU will still be cleaned up a bit, plus most of it will be hidden.

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-06--05--primary-cables-inside.jpeg


Hiding the Messy Bits

Besides the side door, the reservoir mounting plate will hide those bits of my cabling which I
haven't tidied up to insane levels.

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-06--06--cables-with-reservoir.jpeg


20 Wire Run

And a glamour shot of that 20 wire cable. I know I could have routed this cable through a hole
which is situated pretty much perfectly, but since I spend this much time on my cables anyway
I thought I might as well make them a proper feature.

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-06--07--CPU1-PCIE-aux-run.jpeg


That's it for today. I have to admit I look forward to doing something else besides cables
now. There's still some cable work to be done (the pumps, fans and some other small
parts), but the major work is done now. 40 hours of cable work is quite enough for now. biggrin.gif


Next Up

I'll be starting to experiment with the copper tubing next week.


Thanks for stopping by. smile.gif

casetitan 07-06-2013 04:20 AM

Jawbreaking awesome! thumb.gif Very clean look

Apocalypse Maow 07-06-2013 05:09 AM

SUBD!!!

Gardnerphotos 07-06-2013 07:20 AM

subbed!

alpenwasser 07-06-2013 09:07 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by casetitan View Post

Jawbreaking awesome! thumb.gif Very clean look

Quote:
Originally Posted by Apocalypse Maow View Post

SUBD!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gardnerphotos View Post

subbed!

Thanks for the support fellas, it is much appreciated. smile.gif

LeandroJVarini 07-06-2013 10:37 AM

Very beautiful work, following!

Beakz 07-06-2013 05:17 PM

CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), quality = 80
rolleyes.gif

alpenwasser 07-06-2013 05:56 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by LeandroJVarini View Post

Very beautiful work, following!

Thank you! smile.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beakz View Post

[...mother of god...]
rolleyes.gif

Haha, thanks! smile.gif

ledzepp3 07-06-2013 05:58 PM

AN SMH10 BUILD biggrin.gifbiggrin.gifbiggrin.gif subbity sub for sure

alpenwasser 07-08-2013 12:59 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by ledzepp3 View Post

AN SMH10 BUILD biggrin.gifbiggrin.gifbiggrin.gif subbity sub for sure

Thanks man! smile.gif

On another note: She's alive!

With the major cables finished I installed a temporary water loop yesterday and turned her on for the
first time. She POSTs, all RAM and both CPUs are detected and the Titan displays a picture onto the
screen. So I'm very relieved to finally know that my hardware is (probably) working as it should. I will
be installing Arch Linux onto the machine and doing some stress testing in the coming days though.

Besides that, I'll be starting to fiddle around with the copper tubing.

ledzepp3 07-08-2013 10:10 AM

I actually just ordered my SMH10 smile.gif last night!

YP5 Toronto 07-08-2013 10:19 AM

Subbed...love the time and effort you are putting into this.

alpenwasser 07-08-2013 10:25 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by ledzepp3 View Post

I actually just ordered my SMH10 smile.gif last night!

Congrats, I think you'll be very happy with it! thumb.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by YP5 Toronto View Post

Subbed...love the time and effort you are putting into this.

Thank you! smile.gif

ledzepp3 07-08-2013 10:36 AM

How's your sleeving experience been with the Platimax? Does it have 1 to 1 cabling? I've been interested in this PSU for a long time thumb.gif

alpenwasser 07-08-2013 11:09 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by ledzepp3 View Post

How's your sleeving experience been with the Platimax? Does it have 1 to 1 cabling? I've been interested in this PSU for a long time thumb.gif

It's not perfect, but it could be worse. There are a few caveats. The 24 pin has four double wires for voltage
sensing/regulation, and the GPU power cables have clamps on the ground wire groups. I actually plan on
making a more detailed post about how I did the PSU in the next few days, so if it's ok I'll give you what you'll
need to make an informed decision with pics instead of writing an essay. wink.gif

Spoiler though: It's an excellent PSU, but it does not have 1:1 wiring. frown.gif I did however not encounter any
serious frustrations like some people seem to be having with sleeving their Seasonic units.

EDIT

In the meantime, you may be interested in B Negative's SR-2 build. He also had a platimax which
he completely sleeved. I can't recall how he got around the problem of those clamps, but I do remember
him mentioning them.

ledzepp3 07-08-2013 12:49 PM

Thanks man! thumb.gif I'm definitely watching this build every time there's a new post biggrin.gif

socketus 07-08-2013 10:11 PM

In for s'mo' CL building ;-)

alpenwasser 07-09-2013 07:15 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by ledzepp3 View Post

Thanks man! thumb.gif I'm definitely watching this build every time there's a new post biggrin.gif

Thanks! smile.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by socketus View Post

In for s'mo' CL building ;-)

Hehe, thank you. smile.gif


On another note, two small update remarks:
I'm currently experimenting with getting an encrypted Arch Linux installation set up. Since I have the
rig temporarily assembled I might as well do that now before tearing it apart again. I might also go
with FreeBSD, haven't totally decided yet. In any case, fiddling around with Linux/UNIX makes for a nice
change between all the manual work.

I have been experimenting around with the copper tubing. Since 15 mm OD tubing is rather hard to
bend in tight radii, I'm currently thinking that I will most likely do completely straight tubing runs. I
don't really want to use thinner OD tubing. Bitspower fittings are not only very hard to come by where
I live, but also ridiculously expensive (even quite a bit more expensive than Monsoon fittings). So
the next diameter down would be 10 mm with push fittings. And I don't really want to go with that since
for one thing I don't really like the look of those push fittings, and I also think 10 mm tubing is just
kind of a small OD for such a large case. 15 mm tubing has a very nice look to it, plus it would allow me
to use some 16/10 mm Alphacool Shiny Copper fittings (also not at all cheap, but still not as expensive
as the Bitspower ones around here).

Either way, I definitely intend to run copper tubing in this, so no need to worry about that. It just might
be straight runs with sharp angles instead of soft bends.

YP5 Toronto 07-09-2013 07:23 AM

Straight runs...will still function and look amazing. 2 x D5 pumps will have no issues with a bunch of right angles.

alpenwasser 07-09-2013 07:37 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by YP5 Toronto View Post

Straight runs...will still function and look amazing. 2 x D5 pumps will have no issues with a bunch of right angles.

Yeah, I'm not worried about the pump power, and either way I will most likely be very happy with the
end result, it's just that most copper tubing I have seen was bent. But I really like the Alphacool
fittings, so I'm not worrying too much about it. I just thought I'd share some thoughts on the topic
and maybe get some feedback.

It will still take me a while to figure out how to best route my water loop anyway, and only then can
I make a final decision, so we'll see. wink.gif

alpenwasser 07-18-2013 01:38 PM

Various Small Bits


First off, as promised some info on the Platimax and what you will run into when/if you
try to sleeve this PSU.

The GPU Cable


The GPU power cables on the Platimax consist of one 12 pin connector on the PSU side
(six 12 V pins and six ground pins) and two 6+2 pin connectors on the GPU side. Since
that's four more connectors on the GPU side than on the PSU side, the additional ground
wires are clamped together on their way back to the PSU.

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-18--01--platimax-GPU-cable.jpeg


GPU Cable - Ground Wire Clamp

There are two of these clamps per GPU cable, one for each 6+2 pin connector. I haven't
really found a nice way to get around these so what I did is simply remake the entire
cable, as you've seen in my previous post. Since my wires needed to be a lot longer
anyway this wasn't a big deal.

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-18--02--platimax-GPU-clamp.jpeg


The 24 Pin + 8 Pin EPS


The 24 pin cable is bundled with one of the 8 pin EPS cables. There is another 8 pin
EPS which you can run separately, and which also has a 4 pin for the CPU on it, should
you need that instead.

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-18--03--platimax-24pin-psu-side.jpeg


And the other end of the above. There are a few double wires, the most annoying pair
being the ones stacked right on top of each other. Not very nice...

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-18--05--platimax-24pin-8pin-EPS.jpeg


My Own GPU Cable - PSU Side

Since the Titan has a 6 pin and an 8 pin on its PCB you end up with 14 wires. I took the
additional two ground wires of the PCI-E 8 pin connector and ran them to a different
connector's ground pins on the PSU side.


(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-18--06--platimax-GPU-power-psu-side.jpeg


The Raystorms


And now for the pr0n part of today's evening. I've polished the raystorms to a mirror shine.
It's not yet absolutely perfect, but it's not much further... smile.gif

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-18--07--polished-raystorms.jpeg


Other Stuff


I'm still experimenting with the copper tubing. I've needed to order some additional parts
for that, so it will take me a week or two until I can continue. Until then I'm a bit stalled.
Unless I think of something else to do, we'll see... wink.gif


As always, thanks for stopping by. smile.gif

PCModderMike 07-18-2013 02:23 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by alpenwasser View Post

Major Power Cables Finished Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

So, this is what about 40 hours of cabling have gotten me: One 24 pin, two EPS 8 pins,
one PCI-E 8 pin and four PCI-E 6 pins. I'm not completely done with them (I need to
reinforce the 24 pin's lacing a bit), but the main part is done when it comes to power
cables.

The GPU Cable

This is what the GPU cable looked like before lacing.
(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-06--01--GPU-cable.jpeg


CPU1 + PCI-E Aux

These are the cables for the CPU1 power delivery (8 pin EPS + 6 pin PCI-E) and the SR-2's
PCI-E auxiliary 6 pin for the PCI-E slots themselves. Makes for 20 wires in total. First I crimped
their M/B terminals:

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-06--02--CPU1-PCIE-aux-wires.jpeg


After that I colour-coded them to know which pair of wires needed to be sleeved with which
paracord colour. Doing that 20 wire cable is pretty much the only thing I did this week. All in
all it was about 15 hours of work (cutting, crimping, sleeving, lacing). The PSU side crimps
were only crimped onto the wires once the whole harness had been laced so that the
wires had the right length (obviously the outer wires in the bends will have to be longer).

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-06--03--CPU1-PCIE-aux-colour-coding.jpeg


Main Cables

And these are most of the major power cables. What's missing here is the GPU power delivery
because I'd already tied that to the case when I took this picture. As you can see the cables
are all stuck together because of the way I had to do the PSU side of things. How I organize
the PSU connectors is determined by the PSU's power rail design and connector layout.

The harness is surprisingly stiff (considering Silicone wire is very floppy) and holds its shape
pretty well with all the lacing.

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-06--04--main-cables.jpeg


Mounted


And this is how the whole harness looks when it's mounted into the case. The messy bit above
the PSU will still be cleaned up a bit, plus most of it will be hidden.

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-06--05--primary-cables-inside.jpeg


Hiding the Messy Bits

Besides the side door, the reservoir mounting plate will hide those bits of my cabling which I
haven't tidied up to insane levels.

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-06--06--cables-with-reservoir.jpeg

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
20 Wire Run

And a glamour shot of that 20 wire cable. I know I could have routed this cable through a hole
which is situated pretty much perfectly, but since I spend this much time on my cables anyway
I thought I might as well make them a proper feature.

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-06--07--CPU1-PCIE-aux-run.jpeg


That's it for today. I have to admit I look forward to doing something else besides cables
now. There's still some cable work to be done (the pumps, fans and some other small
parts), but the major work is done now. 40 hours of cable work is quite enough for now. biggrin.gif


Next Up

I'll be starting to experiment with the copper tubing next week.


Thanks for stopping by. smile.gif

Your sleeving and cable management skills are fantastic. Can't wait to see more of the build go together.
Also +rep for the cabling tips above, going to use some of those myself. Specifically for handling those dreaded double wires. I started sleeving my AX850 months ago, never finished....but might pick it up again having those tips now.

alpenwasser 07-18-2013 03:51 PM

Thank you for your kind words, they are much appreciated. smile.gif

The double wires were definitely quite a pain, but in the end it was mostly a matter of patience
and persistence, being willing to start over when I had screwed up (which happened a few times
with the double ones mad.gif ).

alpenwasser 07-22-2013 08:37 AM

A Copper Face Plate for the Lamptron FC5V2

While I really like the brushed alu look on the FC5V2, it doesn't really fit all that
well into the rough powder coat on the Caselabs case. So instead of having two
black things which are not the same sort of black I thought I'd turn the fan controller
into an element of contrast and make a polished copper face plate for it.

Taking Things Apart

First I took the fan controller apart to see how everything fits together and get
access to its existing face plate so that I could fit the new one to it.


(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-22--01--lamptron-disassembled.jpeg


Sketching Things Out


The new plate will be made from a 1~1.2 mm (not sure anymore) piece of copper
sheet I had laying around. First: Use the old plate as a stencil and sketch the outlines
of the new plate onto the sheet of copper.

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-22--02--new-plate-sketched-out.jpeg


Raw Cut


After some Dremel work it looked like this:

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-22--03--new-plate-raw-cut.jpeg


Current Status

After lots and lots of filing, sanding and polishing (~5 hours), it currently looks like
this. It is not yet completely flawless, but I'll save the rest of the work for when the
build is in its closing stages. Since the surface is very finicky I don't want to spend
lots of time making it absolutely perfect now only to possibly damage it in a mishap
during the build and then have to redo the whole thing.

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-22--04--new-plate-frontal.jpeg


The new plate is simply taped to the stock plate. It's a lot easier (and cleaner) than
having to drill holes for the screws into the new plate.

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-22--05--new-plate-side.jpeg


(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-22--06--new-plate-close-up.jpeg


That's it for today. As always, thanks for stopping by. smile.gif

Jeti 07-22-2013 08:59 AM

Very very nice. Subbed.
Looking forward to more pr0n

EnigmaMH 07-22-2013 10:49 AM

subbed!

Apocalypse Maow 07-22-2013 10:58 AM

WOW! That's gorgeous!!!

Beakz 07-22-2013 11:13 AM


It's beautiful...

alpenwasser 07-22-2013 11:46 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeti View Post

Very very nice. Subbed.
Looking forward to more pr0n

Quote:
Originally Posted by EnigmaMH View Post

subbed!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Apocalypse Maow View Post

WOW! That's gorgeous!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Beakz View Post

[...IMG...]
It's beautiful...

Thanks folks, your support is much appreciated.

I will still polish the face plate a bit more and then give it a protective clear coat. It tarnishes
very, very easily when it's so finely polished.

YP5 Toronto 07-22-2013 12:24 PM

smexy! Great job.

TATH 07-22-2013 02:59 PM

looks great thumb.gif

alpenwasser 07-23-2013 07:30 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by YP5 Toronto View Post

smexy! Great job.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TATH View Post

looks great thumb.gif


Thank you! smile.gif

Barefooter 07-23-2013 03:09 PM

Sweet copper plate! Now that's custom!

alpenwasser 07-25-2013 10:50 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Barefooter View Post

Sweet copper plate! Now that's custom!

Thank you! smile.gif

And on that topic, I present:

The Aqua Computer Aqualis Copper Edition


Well, obviously this had to be done, I couldn't just have those naked steel parts
in my build. Pretty though they are, copper they are not... biggrin.gif


The Central Pipe


For those unfamiliar with the Aqualis: It's basically a borosilicate glass tube (5 mm
thick, rather heavy, extremely good quality) with two Acetal caps on either end.
The difference when it comes to assembling the reservoir between this and a normal
plexi res is that it's not really possible to cut threads into the glass as you can do
with plexi, hence the central pipe. The pipe screws into the bottom and the top
cap and holds the entire assembly together.

Three possibilities came to my mind for copper-ifying this pipe:
  • make a new pipe from copper
  • paint the existing pipe
  • keep the existing pipe and make a mantle pipe from copper around it

The drawbacks of making a new pipe are that the stock pipe is a very sturdy piece
of steel (presumably). Not only would it be extremely difficult to find a copper pipe
thick enough to cut the required threads into it, but I would also need to go buy
another thread cutter. All of this deterred me from that variant.

Painting the pipe would probably have been the easiest approach, but considering
that copper paint doesn't really ever look like real copper (it can come close, but
when put up against an actual piece of copper you can spot the difference quite
easily) I didn't really like this idea all that much.

So it came down to the third variant. The problem with that was that I didn't really
have a copper pipe with the correct ID for fitting right over the steel pipe, and I don't
think I would have ever found one. Easily visible in this picture:

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-25--01--aqualis-tube-vs-copper-tube.jpeg


Working Around the Diameter Problem


Considering that there is a rather considerable dead angle when it comes to the
visible part of the central pipe I arrived at what you see here. I simply made a length-
wise cut into the copper pipe and sleeved it over the steel pipe. Works like a charm,
the difference is impossible to tell in the final build unless you have x-ray vision. biggrin.gif

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-25--02--mantle-pipe-raw-cut.jpeg


(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-25--03--mantle-pipe-raw-cut.jpeg


Sleeved...


The mantle pipe sleeved onto the stock pipe:

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-25--04--mantle-pipe-mounted.jpeg


... and Polished


Since there were considerable scratches in the copper pipe this took quite a while
longer than the copper face plate for the FC5V2.

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-25--05--mantle-pipe-polished.jpeg


(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-25--06--mantle-pipe-polished.jpeg


The Anti-Vortex Plate - Stock

This is the stock plate on top of the sketch for what was to become its replacement.

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-25--07--anti-vortex-plate-sketched.jpeg


New Plate - Raw Cut


The raw cut for the new plate:

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-25--08--anti-vortex-plate-raw-cut.jpeg


New Plate - Bent and Polished


(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-25--09--anti-vortex-plate-bent-and-polished.jpeg


(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-25--10--anti-vortex-plate-bent-and-polished.jpeg


Copper Mounting Bracket


Unfortunately I forgot to take pictures of this during manufacturing. Here it is bolted
to the reservoir. You can see that I still need to debur the mounting holes. Also my
apologies about the finger print, didn't catch that until it was too late.

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-25--11--copper-bracket.jpeg


Bottom Cap Assembly - Back Side


This is the back side which won't be visible when it's mounted in the case. You can
also see that I've replaced the stock screws with shiny copper screws from Alphacool.
The steel screw can't be seen when it's mounted, so I left it as is since I didn't have a
suitable replacement anyway.

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-25--12--assembly-back-side.jpeg


Aqualis - Copper Edition


And this is the current status. There are still a few imperfections I need to file/sand
out, but for the most part it's finished.


(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-25--13--aqualils-copper-edition.jpeg

So long, and thanks for visiting... smile.gif

ledzepp3 07-25-2013 11:42 AM

Got my SMH10.. And wow. Oh, sweet build so far! thumb.gif

alpenwasser 07-25-2013 12:29 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by ledzepp3 View Post

Got my SMH10.. And wow. Oh, sweet build so far! thumb.gif

Great, have fun with it! And thanks! smile.gif

Beakz 07-25-2013 12:51 PM

I never thought copper could look so good! +rep

alpenwasser 07-25-2013 01:39 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Beakz View Post

I never thought copper could look so good! +rep

Yeah, one may say I have a slight fetish for it. I just love copper. wubsmiley.gif

Thanks! smile.gif

socketus 07-25-2013 01:46 PM

eek.gif - something bright and shiny thumb.gif

luciddreamer124 07-25-2013 02:01 PM

Looking great dude!

alpenwasser 07-25-2013 02:49 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by socketus View Post

eek.gif - something bright and shiny thumb.gif

Hehe, yes indeed biggrin.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by luciddreamer124 View Post

Looking great dude!

Thanks man!

casetitan 07-25-2013 03:00 PM

Looking really nice ! Coming along great thumb.gif

alpenwasser 07-25-2013 04:52 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by casetitan View Post

Looking really nice ! Coming along great thumb.gif

Thanks! smile.gif

DiGiCiDAL 07-27-2013 01:05 PM

Subbed. The amount of effort you've put into cable-stitching alone is amazing... the polishing is equally so... this will definitely fit the acronym well! I'm guessing that you've got to have a hundred hours invested in just those two pursuits at this point... biggrin.gif

alpenwasser 07-27-2013 02:54 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by DiGiCiDAL View Post

Subbed. The amount of effort you've put into cable-stitching alone is amazing... the polishing is equally so... this will definitely fit the acronym well! I'm guessing that you've got to have a hundred hours invested in just those two pursuits at this point... biggrin.gif

Thanks! TBH except for the cables (~40 to 50 hours) I haven't really been keeping track of how much time
I've put into this, but a rough estimate makes me think that you're probably not far off. I'd say I have more
than 100 hours in it at this point, but probably fewer than 200. So yeah, the acronym is definitely a good
fit for this. biggrin.gif


Since I'm typing anyway: I have received some more parts for experimenting around with the copper pipes
yesterday, and will be putting them to use tomorrow, so if things go well I may have solved the copper pipe
issues next week. smile.gif

DerComissar 07-27-2013 03:57 PM

Subbed.
Absolutely enjoying seeing this build go together. And learning a lot from it!
The log is incredibly thorough and well-photographed, and deserves a Rep+thumb.gif

Jeffinslaw 07-27-2013 04:38 PM

I will sub to this!

Jeffinslaw

alpenwasser 07-27-2013 06:51 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by DerComissar View Post

Subbed.
Absolutely enjoying seeing this build go together. And learning a lot from it!
The log is incredibly thorough and well-photographed, and deserves a Rep+thumb.gif

Thank you for the kind words. Photography is actually something else I'm very much interested in, but being
a college student I had to prioritize my spending and got this PC instead. But all in good time... biggrin.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeffinslaw View Post

I will sub to this!

Jeffinslaw

Thanks! smile.gif

theseekeroffun 07-27-2013 07:24 PM

Great job on the sleeving! I cannot wait to see what you do with the SATA cables.

GeneratorJ 07-28-2013 02:09 AM

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Quote:
Originally Posted by alpenwasser View Post


Mounted


And this is how the whole harness looks when it's mounted into the case. The messy bit above
the PSU will still be cleaned up a bit, plus most of it will be hidden.

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-06--05--primary-cables-inside.jpeg


Hiding the Messy Bits

Besides the side door, the reservoir mounting plate will hide those bits of my cabling which I
haven't tidied up to insane levels.

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-06--06--cables-with-reservoir.jpeg


20 Wire Run

And a glamour shot of that 20 wire cable. I know I could have routed this cable through a hole
which is situated pretty much perfectly, but since I spend this much time on my cables anyway
I thought I might as well make them a proper feature.

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-07-06--07--CPU1-PCIE-aux-run.jpeg


That's it for today. I have to admit I look forward to doing something else besides cables
now. There's still some cable work to be done (the pumps, fans and some other small
parts), but the major work is done now. 40 hours of cable work is quite enough for now. biggrin.gif


Next Up

I'll be starting to experiment with the copper tubing next week.


Thanks for stopping by. smile.gif

Simply stunning! And Jaw Dropping cabling!

If this is just cabling...

Man I cant wait for the rest of the build!

deafboy 07-28-2013 02:28 AM

Also subbing for this... looking forward to it's progression, very nice work so far smile.gif

Lutfij 07-28-2013 04:27 AM

subbed to this build log!

kingchris 07-28-2013 04:34 AM

impressive build. first class cables.

alpenwasser 07-28-2013 07:23 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by theseekeroffun View Post

Great job on the sleeving! I cannot wait to see what you do with the SATA cables.

Hehe, thank you. I haven't yet decided on the SATA cables actually (I'm assuming you're talking about the power
delivery, not the data cables), but it may be something similar to this (this is a build I finished in June, haven't
posted a log here because I only joined OCN after having finished it):

aw--zeus--2013-05-21--04--pump-power.jpeg

Since the rig above is my server I won't really have too many drives in this one, so the SATA cables probably
won't be too spectacular. wink.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeneratorJ View Post


Simply stunning! And Jaw Dropping cabling!

If this is just cabling...

Man I cant wait for the rest of the build!

Thank you, your kind words are much appreciated! smile.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by deafboy View Post

Also subbing for this... looking forward to it's progression, very nice work so far smile.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lutfij View Post

subbed to this build log!

Quote:
Originally Posted by kingchris View Post

impressive build. first class cables.


Thanks for the support folks!

theseekeroffun 07-28-2013 10:19 AM

Actually I was thinking about the power and the data cables both. I am about to use Paracord for my next sleeving job and I have a breakout cable that I will have to tackle. Matching the Paracord color to Lutros sleeving may be my best option.
Excellent job on the sata power cables! That is a lot of work.

alpenwasser 07-29-2013 06:51 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by theseekeroffun View Post

Actually I was thinking about the power and the data cables both. I am about to use Paracord for my next sleeving job and I have a breakout cable that I will have to tackle. Matching the Paracord color to Lutros sleeving may be my best option.
Excellent job on the sata power cables! That is a lot of work.

Ah, I see. The data cables will probably not be sleeved. I have bought some round cables with angled
connectors, which makes the cable routing much cleaner, but they're practically impossible to sleeve.
But since they're completely black they won't stand out like an eye sore, so I think it'll be fine.

And thanks for the compliments. smile.gif

alpenwasser 07-29-2013 09:28 AM

Ok, small update (well, sort of): I have epoxied something together and am currently waiting for it to
set so that I can then test it afterwards. In the meantime I thought some of you might be interested
in the previous build of which I posted a pic above.

As mentioned it was already done by the time I joined OCN, and I didn't really feel like posting a retroactive
build log, but for those interested I thought I'd post it here.

It is called:

h163

Prologue


The purpose of this rig is to serve as our data server for our household (work and multimedia), as our
HTPC in our living room (once HELIOS is up and running, for the time being ZEUS is actually my main rig),
and also do some computing for BOINC (hence the 2600k).


Modding

I have replaced the entire back panel of the R4 with a custom one made to accept a 360 radiator.


The Name

Zwieback Exceeding Useful Specifications.

Because: Why not? Zwieback is a hilarious word, and in English doubly so (I don't know why I think that, I just do.)


Main PC Guts
  • M/B: MSI Z77A-GD65
  • CPU: Intel i7 2600k
  • RAM: 4 GB Kinstong HyperX
  • GPU: Onboard
  • SSD: Intel 335 60 GB
  • HDD's: 4 x WD RE4 2 TB
  • HDD's: 3 x WD Red 3 TB
  • PSU: BeQuiet 550 W
  • Case: Fractal Design R4 w/ window side panel


W/C Parts
  • CPU Block: EK Supreme HF Acetal/Copper
  • Pump: Aquacomputer Aquastream Standard
  • Res: Aquacomputer Aquainlet blue anodized
  • Rad Fans: 3 x SP120 quiet
  • Radiator: Alphacool NexXxos UT60 360 mm



Starting the New Back Panel


The Case


The R4 after being stripped of its back panel

(click image for full res)
w800


Rivets


A few rivets had to be sacrificed for the greater good smile.gif

(click image for full res)
w800


Paint Jobs


Ah yes, the happy coincidence of this build smile.gif
The new back panel is made from the Caselabs SMH10's bottom plate. I have replaced
the stock bottom plate in my SMH10 for HELIOS with a meshed version, so this one is
no longer needed. It has the perfect width for this and is high enough (the unneeded
height will be cut off, naturally).

Besides the good dimensional fit, the Caselabs bottom panel also has a very nice powdercoat
job that matches the R4's very nicely. Not that this will ever be seen (placed in a sideboard),
but it's still nice to have this matching.

(click image for full res)
w800


Dimensions

As mentioned above, perfect width.

(click image for full res)
w800


Protection

I taped two layers onto the panel for protection from mechanical damage. The lower layer was
made up from low-adhesion tape, the second one was a rather sturdy painter's tape.

(click image for full res)
w800


Radiator - Corner Bolts

First I drilled the corner holes for bolting the radiator to the panel.

(click image for full res)
w800


Mesh Pattern

Instead of simply cutting out the entire radiator section and mounting a mesh onto it I decided
to make my own mesh by drilling lots and lots of holes. It did not come out perfect, but since it's at
the case's back side and will never be seen by anyone again I can live with a few imperfections.

I made a pattern which I printed onto sheets of paper and then taped onto the panel.
This served as a reference for drilling the wholes.

For those interested: Pattern Link (pdf)

For different spacings you can easily scale the pdf up or down.

Anyway, on to the work:

(click image for full res)
w800


Red Zone

The red zone denotes where I should not drill

w800


Drilling - Start

I soon realized that I would have to overlay the entire paper with a protective sheet of adhesive
tape. It just tore up too easily. Should have used adhesive paper.

(click image for full res)
w800


Nooo! :cussing:

Right before the finishing line of phase 1, the drill bit broke! Aaargh!

(click image for full res)
w800


Phase 1 Complete

After about four hours of drilling (ouch, my wrist frown.gif ):

(click image for full res)
w800


Phase 1 Complete - Naked

Clearly it did not turn out perfect, but as said above, it won't be seen anyway. Plus, once it was painted
and mounted the mistakes in the pattern didn't stand out nearly as much as they did here.

Somebody on OC3D actually counted the holes, allegedly it's 1174 IIRC

(click image for full res)
w800



New Back Panel - Progress

Cutting the panel to size and making the cutout for the I/O shield

Overview

It fit almost perfectly into the R4. I needed to make a few minor adjustments (taking a mm off here
or there), but overall the fit was damn near perfect.

(click image for full res)
w800


Perfect Width

Not much to say here. Width of the SMH10's bottom panel was perfect.

(click image for full res)
w800


Overview

To give you an impression of the concept behind all these shenanigans wink.gif

(click image for full res)
w800


Radiator

A closer look at how the radiator fits in.

(click image for full res)
w800


Space Left

The space left between the M/B and the rad.

(click image for full res)
w800


The PSU Mount

External Shot - No Front Panel

As you can see, there was still some refinement required, but this gives you a pretty good idea
about how everything fits together. Since the front panel hides this anyway, it does not need to
be absolutely perfect.

(click image for full res)
w800


External Shot - Front Panel Mounted

The 90 degree plug fits just behind the front door, so it does close. smile.gif

(click image for full res)
w800


Internal Shot

I had started to sleeve some of the cables to get some practice before actually arriving at my final
concept for the build. Therefore, I was not yet aware at that point that I would be placing the PSU
in a new location, so all the wires were too long. In the end I ended up resleeving everything.

(click image for full res)
w800


Sleeving - Part One


Opening the PSU


Couldn't really sleeve this properly without opening the PSU.
Feel free to mock me for the terrible hideousness to the left of the PSU.

(click image for full res)
w800


Cutting Unneeded Wires

Since I will be needing neither the PCI-E auxiliary power cables nor all of the SATA and
Molex power connectors, some of the wires have been cut and their remains kept inside the
PSU. I've left enough wire to have something to solder on to should I ever need to do that
for whichever reason (unlikely, but not impossible). The brownish stuff on the red wires is
just tape residue, not a burned wire, for those worrying. wink.gif

I've numbered them and written down what connects to what in case of restoration.

(click image for full res)
w800


Cable Lacing

This is where my fetish for cable lacing (sewing,stitchin) started. I was still
developing my technique at this point, these are a few early experiments.

Front side of my very first try during the process:

(click image for full res)
w800

Same try, later stage:

(click image for full res)
w800

The back side of that wire group:

(click image for full res)
w800


24 Pin

Ok then, let's try this on a double layer cable with a bit more wires:

(click image for full res)
w800

Notice that the 24 pin is rather short at this point. This makes it a bit tricky to get it neat
and tidy. This is not the end result.

(click image for full res)
w800


HDD Tower

Since the top of the HDD tower (or however one chooses to call it) is anchored to the 5.25"
bay enclosure in the case's standard config and said enclosure has been discarded in this
build, I've had to devise a new plan to make sure the HDD's stay in place and everything looks
right.

I've decided to anchor the HDD tower's top place directly to the underside of the PSU. So,
let's make a few holes:

(click image for full res)
w800


HDD Tower - Overview

The tower is pretty much straight now, its top end is 0.5 mm further away from the case front
than its bottom part. It's measurable but not really noticeable.

(click image for full res)
w800


SATA Power Cable

The PSU is still open at this point because I still need to make a few adjustments to it.

(click image for full res)
w800


PSU Sleeving - Continued


SATA Power Cables

While the 90 degree SATA power connectors allow for extremely neat wire routing, they are
not really well suited for sleeving. I am not yet 100 % happy with the result, but it's better
than before (or let's say: I like it better than before). I can always redo it later if I get some
clever idea about how to improve it and make it truly perfect.

To give you an idea of how I went about this problem:

(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-05-21--02--sleeving-sata-power.jpeg


And the current state of affairs on the HDD tower's back side:

(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-05-21--03--sleeving-sata-power.jpeg


Pump Power Delivery

Obviously the pump can't run without some voltage goodness. smile.gif
This is not the final cable routing, but it shows the rough idea.

(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-05-21--04--pump-power.jpeg


Fan Power Delivery


Remember those clipped wires I mentioned yesterday and how I left some cable to solder
on to in case I ever needed them again? Good thing I did that. Originally I was going to run
the fans off the same cable as the pump, but then I realized that I would have to do double
wires inside the crimp connectors, which I really don't like. They're almost impossible
to crimp unless you have very thin wires (I don't), and they're an absolute nightmare to
sleeve.

So I decided to to a dedicated fan cable. This is where I soldered the new wires onto
the remains of the old ones:

(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-05-21--05--fan-power-psu.jpeg


Overview:

(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-05-21--06--fan-power.jpeg


And this is how I planned to connect the fans at that point:

(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-05-21--07--fan-power-hub.jpeg


Making a Custom Fan Controller

As some of you may know, the SP120's are not exactly all that quiet on 12 V. Now,
I could just use the old 5 V or 7 V wire switcheroo mod, but that would not give
me very good control over the fan speed. Since I don't yet know what the temps
are going to be like, and since I will need this machine to be as quiet as possible,
I have decided to make a custom fan controller.

The idea of this is not so much to constantly change the fan speeds, but to be able
to adjust the fan speed to the optimal level and then leave it at that, possibly
changing it if it gets very hot in summer. But other than that, I won't be tinkering
around with fan speeds all the time on this, it's more of a set-and-forget thing.


The Phobya Fan Splitter PCB

First things first: I needed some connectors. So I desoldered this Xigmatek fan splitter.

(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-05-22--01--phobya-fan-pcb.jpeg


The New PCB

Then I soldered those connectors onto a new PCB, along with a variable resistor.

(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-05-22--02--custom-fan-pcb.jpeg


Cutting it down to Size

Obviously it couldn't stay like that.

(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-05-22--03--custom-fan-pcb-cut.jpeg

And another angle:
(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-05-22--04--custom-fan-pcb-cut.jpeg


The Backside

I gotta say: This was one tricky bastard. I'm talking about tweezers and taking more
than an hour to solder these few wires. To be honest I would have required an additional
pair of hands, doing it like this wasn't really an optimal solution. Since my soldering
iron can't be adjusted I ended up melting off some of the insultation on the wires (they
heat up extremely quickly since they're so short and tiny).

The red tape was just for supporte. To give it a bit of extra strength and to compensate
for the melted insulation I've encased the connections with epoxy glue.

If I was to do this more often I would definitely get a proper soldering iron and make
myself some sort of contraption which could hold everything in place so that I could do
some properly precise work.

(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-05-22--05--custom-fan-pcb-backside.jpeg


It Lives!

Yeah, despite the not exactly stellar soldering job it works as planned. And there are
no loose connections or anything like that. I applied some force to the connectors while
it was running, no problem at all. So it might not look very nice, but it's solid,
especially once it has some additional strength from the glue (the 4 pin connector does
wiggle around quite a bit when I take out the plug, so that definitely needs additional
strengthening).

I certainly won't be doing it again just to get the soldering perfect since it's working
without flaw. smile.gif

(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-05-22--06--custom-fan-pcb-working.jpeg


Fan Controller - Finished

I strengthened the fan controller with quite a substantial amount of epoxy glue. It might
not be the prettiest, but it won't be visible and it's pretty much bomb proof at this point.

aw--zeus--2013-05-29--01--fan-controller.jpeg


aw--zeus--2013-05-29--02--fan-controller-back.jpeg


PSU - Finished (More or Less)

There's still some very minor finishing touches to be applied, but it's as good as done.

aw--zeus--2013-05-29--03--psu-overview.jpeg


24 Pin - Detail

There's a minor mistake in my lacing in the middle lacing section. Ah well, stuff happens...

aw--zeus--2013-05-29--04--24pin-detail.jpeg

Fan Cable

This cable connects to the fan controller, hence only the 12 V wire. Obviously I couldn't
use the same technique for this as for the 24 pin.

aw--zeus--2013-05-29--05--dual-wire-lacing-detail.jpeg

Back Panel - Progress


Paint

Since I don't want to repaint the entire panel, I used this to paint each hole individually.
Yes, it was a rather slow process.

(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-05-29--06--humbrol.jpeg


Back Panel - Inner Side

This side had not been painted yet. I thought this would provide some good contrast to see
the difference.

(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-05-29--07--back-panel-inside.jpeg


Back Panel - Outer Side

The screw holes won't be painted, since they won't be visible (also, they are threaded).

(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-05-29--08--back-panel-outside.jpeg


Back Panel - Test Fit

It fits nice and snug, and it's all solid and good.

(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-05-29--08--back-panel-test-fit.jpeg


Back Panel - M/B Test Fit

The M/B fits nicely to the new back panel. The I/O shield lines up perfectly.
You can also see the screws used to mount the panel. As you can see, there's no nuts involved, the threads
are directly in the back panel. It's thick enough for this to work nicely, as long as you're not too brutal there's
no danger of ripping the threads out of the aluminium.

(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-05-29--09--back-panel-test-fit.jpeg


Reservoir Modding


The Problem

A few years ago (probably ~2007) I bought this nice little reservoir for my Eheim 1046.
It's a very handy little thing, and it's built like a bloody tank (seriously, you could bludgeon
somebody to death with this).

However, back then Aquacomputer had not yet fully jumped on the G1/4" train and was still
using G1/8" in many of their products (as they had since their inception).

This required a rather ugly and unwieldy adapter when wanting to use modern fittings, such
as the lovely blue Monsoon ones I've bought.

The adapter itself looked like this:

(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-05-30--01--reservoir-g18-adapter.jpeg

And with a fitting on it:

(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-05-30--02--reservoir-g18-adapter.jpeg


The Plan

Well, it's quite simple really: Retap the hole to G1/4". However, this would leave me with a
slight problem: Naked aluminium exposed to the coolant. I will be using a corrosion inhibitor
in my loop, but I want to reduce the chance for corrosion to ruin the party by painting over the
naked aluminium and sealing the hole thing against the coolant.

Disclaimer

I'm well aware of what galvanic corrosion is and how it works (well, I'm not a chemist, but I have
a better grasp of it than most people I'd say). I'm not saying that what you're about to bear witness
to is a good idea or something you should necessarily try yourself. It's an experiment. If it works,
great, if not, I haven't lost anything since I have no more use for the reservoir anyway. But don't
anybody start panicking about corrosion please. I'm aware of the risks, I've weighed them and
I've made an informed decision to go ahead.

Protecting the Insides

Obviously we don't want to crash into the opposing inner wall with our drill.

(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-05-30--03--reservoir-protection.jpeg


The Drill and Tap

The 11.80 mm drill bit with the G1/4" tap.

(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-05-30--04--drill-and-tap.jpeg


Improvising

The 11.80 didn't fit into the drill bit adapter, so I had to improvise a bit. The adapter actually
belongs to a Bosch pneumatic drill hammer, but that thing is way too powerful for this sort
of thing, so I decided to go with this configuration. It worked surprisingly well.

Naturally I didn't just drill the G1/8" to 11.80 mm, but first to 9 mm, 10 mm and then to
11.80 mm (a 11 mm drill bit would have been handy, 10 to 11.80 is a rather large step).

(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-05-30--05--improvising.jpeg


Lubrication

I didn't have any actual lubricant specifically for this, so I just used some of the gun lubricant I have
laying around (both for drilling and tapping the thread). Since it's made for the high speed movement
of a gun action, it works very well for this.

(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-05-30--06--lubrication.jpeg


Tapping Hole

The 11.80 mm hole before threading.

(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-05-30--07--tapping-hole.jpeg


Threading

And after cutting the thread. You can clearly see how thick the walls are on this thing. That's
why you need to lubricate very well. Otherwise the drill just blocks.

(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-05-30--08--thread.jpeg


Test Fit

As expected, much better. smile.gif

(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-05-30--09--monsoon-test-fit.jpeg


Protection

Alright then, let's paint that sucker! I did one coat of etch primer and two coats of paint.
Obviously I can't really do proper surface treatment within the thread, or put on too much
paint since it will just get stripped off by the fitting's thread anyway, but this should work
well enough to prevent the coolant from getting to the naked aluminium.

(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-05-30--10--covering-tape.jpeg

And on the inside:

(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-05-30--11--covering-inside.jpeg


Painted

The coat is pretty thick and has bonded nicely to the surface.

(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-05-30--12--thread-painted.jpeg

Done

The Monsoon fitting hides the paint job very well, and it goes in and out without
strippint the paint off the threads (there were two small patches of paint stripped
off, but I've covered those with the Humbrol enamel paint and things are nice and
sealed now).

As you can see, the reservoir has sustained the occasional scratch over the years.

(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-05-30--13--monsoon-fit.jpeg


Complete! (For Now wink.gif)

This is the rig in its current state. It got BOTW for June-28 on the LTT forums and was featured on Fractal
Design's NA website, so I'm really very happy with the response it's gotten. Of course it's not perfect, but
few things are, and it's running very well so far. smile.gif

(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-06-23--01--complete-closed.png

(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-06-23--02--complete-open.png

(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-06-23--03--innards-front.jpeg

(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-06-23--04--back-side.png

(click image for full res)
aw--zeus--2013-06-23--05--cpu-area.png


Software

I'm running Arch Linux with ZFS via ZFS on Linux. It's pretty awesome thumb.gif

(click image for full res)
2013-06-23--17-00-55--zpool-status.png


That's it for today, now if you excuse me, I have 90 pounds of dog making puppy eyes at me because
it's dinner time... wubsmiley.gif

EnigmaMH 07-29-2013 10:06 AM

So clean and so simple, yet so good looking!

YP5 Toronto 07-29-2013 10:18 AM

congrats! Looks clean.

alpenwasser 07-29-2013 12:39 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by EnigmaMH View Post

So clean and so simple, yet so good looking!

Quote:
Originally Posted by YP5 Toronto View Post

congrats! Looks clean.

Thanks guys! smile.gif

Yeah it needed to be subtle since it's going to be placed in our living room (besides the fact that I usually
prefer understatement over flash already).

pcmonky 07-29-2013 05:59 PM

Awesome build, amazing sleeving.

With everything all done, the color theme and all stands out and look awesome.

July 2013 mod of the month, I vote for your build!

alpenwasser 07-29-2013 06:37 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by pcmonky View Post

Awesome build, amazing sleeving.

With everything all done, the color theme and all stands out and look awesome.

July 2013 mod of the month, I vote for your build!


Thank you very much for the kind words! smile.gif

I didn't even know I was nominated! biggrin.gif But unfortunately I'm not elegible since both of these builds have been/
are being posted on two other forums (LTT and OC3D) as well. I was out of the PC game for quite a long while
and simply didn't find this forum soon enough to make it an exclusive build.

Nonetheless, thank you very much for the support, it is highly appreciated!

alpenwasser 08-22-2013 01:31 AM

So, quick update on my health status for those interested: Operation yesterday went well from
how things are looking now. I will however have to stay in the hospital for at least another week.

Basically I had a bone infection and they cut out the surrounding damaged tissue as well as the
infected bone. Now they have me on some very serious intravenous antibiotics for the next 6 days
at minimum. After that I'll be on an antibiotics regimen for at least another six weeks.

For the time being I'm feeling pretty well, hopefully things stay like that.

Luckily, they have Wi-Fi. wubsmiley.gif

kingchris 08-22-2013 04:06 AM

glad your okay.

theseekeroffun 08-22-2013 07:01 AM

Very happy to hear that you are ok and I look forward to your progress with Helios.

Apocalypse Maow 08-22-2013 11:27 AM

Good to hear you're on the up! Stay strong brother! thumb.gif

alpenwasser 08-22-2013 12:34 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by kingchris View Post

glad your okay.

Quote:
Originally Posted by theseekeroffun View Post

Very happy to hear that you are ok and I look forward to your progress with Helios.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Apocalypse Maow View Post

Good to hear you're on the up! Stay strong brother! thumb.gif


Thanks for the support fellas! I'm definitely looking forward to finishing this project, but obviously it will
take a while until I can continue.


So long
-aw

DerComissar 08-22-2013 02:53 PM

No rush, your health is what matter the most.
Those cables!thumb.gif

freitz 08-22-2013 06:42 PM

Just Found this log nice work. Subbed

alpenwasser 08-24-2013 06:34 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by DerComissar View Post

No rush, your health is what matter the most.
Those cables!thumb.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by freitz View Post

Just Found this log nice work. Subbed


Thanks fellas! I'm currently dealing with the side effects of the broadband antibiotics on my digestive
system (nausea, diarrhea, lack of appetite). Nothing unexpected, but still very unpleasant.

However, the general healing process seems to be on track so far, which is nice. smile.gif

Lutfij 08-24-2013 02:50 PM

Get well soon mate! You have this build log to complete and take a MOTM crown smile.gif
thumb.gif

alpenwasser 09-11-2013 10:37 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lutfij View Post

Get well soon mate! You have this build log to complete and take a MOTM crown smile.gif
thumb.gif

Actually it was already sort-of-nominated, but since I've also featured it on other forums it doesn't qualify.
It's OK though, still a big compliment smile.gif


Anyway:

Build Status

Since college will be starting next week and I'm still not yet @100% health-wise, progress for the foreseeable
future will be slow, but there will be progress. I'm currently waiting on some parts which should get here some
time next week.

Cheers,
-aw

Lutfij 09-11-2013 01:11 PM

Hope your doing well mate smile.gif

Looking forward to your updates no matter how slow it'll be...and yeah slow and steady wins the race. Besides it gives you time to reflect upon your work and also rethink some strategies if you feel you went too fast biggrin.gif

* I checked out your other pages where you build was featured...you haven't completed them thus the traffic would be diverted onto OCN..still think your work is deserving of MOTM nomination for sure instead of a half made nomination.

tSgt 09-11-2013 01:17 PM

Get well, and update whenever you have time ! biggrin.gif

alpenwasser 09-11-2013 06:31 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lutfij View Post

Hope your doing well mate smile.gif

Looking forward to your updates no matter how slow it'll be...and yeah slow and steady wins the race. Besides it gives you time to reflect upon your work and also rethink some strategies if you feel you went too fast biggrin.gif

* I checked out your other pages where you build was featured...you haven't completed them thus the traffic would be diverted onto OCN..still think your work is deserving of MOTM nomination for sure instead of a half made nomination.

Hehe, thanks for the kind words, they are much appreciated. And yeah, slow and steady... smile.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by tSgt View Post

Get well, and update whenever you have time ! biggrin.gif

Thanks dude, will do. smile.gif

alpenwasser 09-14-2013 09:51 AM

Prototype: Bitfenix Spectre Pro Copper Edition

This is just a prototype. The fan is very annoying to take apart and before I do this
with all the rest of them I need to make sure the process doesn't damage the bearing
or anything like that. So: testing.

But, in the meantime, I thought I'd present you with this:

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-09-14--03--spectre-pro-copper.png


(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-09-14--04--spectre-pro-copper.png


(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-09-14--05--spectre-pro-copper.png

Cakewalk_S 09-14-2013 10:04 AM

Those fans look incredible! Major props man! Awesome build so far! The cable management and sleeving is next to perfect as well.

Lutfij 09-14-2013 10:58 AM

OI!?!?!? How you achieve that awesome sauce? tongue.gif Seriously, got a guide to how you did it?
***How's your health mate? smile.gif

alpenwasser 09-14-2013 11:17 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cakewalk_S View Post

Those fans look incredible! Major props man! Awesome build so far! The cable management and sleeving is next to perfect as well.

Thanks, it's nice to see one's efforts appreciated, especially after spending so much time on it (the cabling,
I mean rolleyes.gif ).
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lutfij View Post

OI!?!?!? How you achieve that awesome sauce? tongue.gif Seriously, got a guide to how you did it?
***How's your health mate? smile.gif

Thanks for the kind words. smile.gif

If the fan is still working properly (haven't been able to test it yet) I'll definitely do a video tutorial, maybe
a video, when I mod the remaining fans for the build. This was just a quick test run to see how it would look
and if it would be worth the hassle. It's more work than you'd think to take it apart and tape off the stator
with the electronics (especially if you do it for 12 fans biggrin.gif ).

If I really do this for the rest of my fans I will properly document the process and show how to take them
apart, what paint I use etc.

EDIT:
Health is improving, but I'm not yet @100%. Still have some trouble sitting for extended periods of time
(the coccyx is a really inconvenient location to have a major malfunction weirdsmiley.gif ). So yeah, I'm getting
better, but I'm not yet at full combat readiness.

Lutfij 09-14-2013 11:45 AM

Wishing you good health mate smile.gif progress pics can wait until then...though I'm really eager to see that copper paint tongue.gif

kingchris 09-15-2013 12:05 AM

glad your coming along okay, and the fan looks FANtastic. biggrin.gif

alpenwasser 09-15-2013 10:28 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lutfij View Post

Wishing you good health mate smile.gif progress pics can wait until then...though I'm really eager to see that copper paint tongue.gif

Thanks! The paint is a metallic spray paint with actual copper particles suspended in a solution. It's even
supposed to age like normal copper once you apply it.

It is a bit darker than actual copper because of course the small copper particles don't reflect the light as
well as one continuing smooth piece of copper, but it's as close to copper as I can get without actually
fabricating the pieces from copper (which would be a bit tricky with the fans and the other stuff I'm using
it for) or plating them (expensive, and not possible with plastic AFAIK).

I had to search for quite a while until I found it in a shop which would actually deliver to me (couldn't find it
locally anywhere), and it turned out to be rather expensive with all the shipping and taxes.
Quote:
Originally Posted by kingchris View Post

glad your coming along okay, and the fan looks FANtastic. biggrin.gif

Thanks, I'm really quite happy with it as well. smile.gif

alpenwasser 09-15-2013 02:35 PM

MIPS SR-2 Block: Painted Screws


Originally, the MIPS block looked like this:


(click image for full res)
sr2_blocks_front.jpg

(click image for full res)
sr2_blocks_back.jpg

While I really like the block, the standard steel screws have always been bugging
me. They did make a Nickel Edition, for which those screws are of course much better
suited, but to me this just never really looked 100% right. I considered going with
black screws, but then I thought I might as well add some contrast in there while
I'm at it and painted the screws in copper today (same paint I'm using for the
fans).

I have to say, I really like the result. Also, apologies about how dirty the large block
looks in this picture, the lighting hit it just at the right angle to bring it out perfectly. wth.gif

It has lots of fine marks and scratches on it because the Acetal is so soft, so I will
be polishing this a bit before putting it in. But I wanted to show you the current state
of affairs anyway.

(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-09-15--01--sr-block.png


(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-09-15--02--sr-block-cpu0.png


(click image for full res)
aw--helios--2013-09-15--03--sr-block-main.png

braindeadmac 09-15-2013 04:14 PM

Looking nice. I have the same block in one of my builds. RIP MIPS


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