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-   -   Has anyone else gotten 'too old for games'? (https://www.overclock.net/forum/82-video-games-general/1679809-has-anyone-else-gotten-too-old-games.html)

evensen007 04-04-2018 10:04 AM

Has anyone else gotten 'too old for games'?
 
I've been thinking about this on and off for the last 5-8 years. I'm 38 years old now and have this strange feeling in my gut every time I visit this site or see an old email or post about a video game I used to play. It's an uncomfortable combination of nostalgia, sadness, and shock at how fast years seem to fly by. On that last point, I always have this sinking feeling when I get reminded of a game I used to play (Dragon Age: Origins and Baldur's Gate were recent ones) and then realize how long ago it was that I played and enjoyed those games. This might be something that only the older people on here may relate to, but it's something that happens to me often and tugs at my heart in a strange way. In some sense, I believe that those games are time markers that relate to a part of my life (I was only 20 years old when Baldur's gate came out!?), but they also make me yearn for a time in my life when I actually had the TIME to play video games for more than an hour every month or two. I imagine those of you with kids feel this sensation even harder than I do. I've been working on my life these past 8 years (which I have not regret about) and have dabbled back into games on and off during that time. I can't IMAGINE though sitting down to a game like Baldur's Gate again and actually being able to get through it and enjoy it. That makes me sad. I don't even really have any friends that play games or especially know games that I used to play back in the day that still give me such great memories. I had some friends back in my old state and job that used to get together for some Battlefield 4 and then most recently BF1. BF1 lasted about 3-4 months for us and then it waned.

I don't even really know what I'm trying to say with this post or if it even belongs in this sub-forum. Maybe I think I'm just trying to reach out to fellow former gamers my age that have felt this same uneasy feeling as you've gotten older. Maybe the broader sense and feeling is what most normal people recognize as getting older in general and becoming hyper aware of the shockingly fast passage of time. Sometimes I'll read my old posts from 5, 6, 7, 8 years ago and fondly remember caring about and putting quality time into gaming. Sometimes I'm scared that I really have outgrown games and it would never be the same anyway. There's a guy I talked to about the dream of having 6 months off of life so that I could go back and replay some of my favorite games from the old days, and maybe burn through some games in the backlog that I've always wanted to try. But maybe I wouldn't even want to once I did have the time. Who knows. Whatever the case, games will always hold a very dear and nostalgic place in my heart.

levifig 04-04-2018 10:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by evensen007 (Post 27091137)
I've been thinking about this on and off for the last 5-8 years. I'm 38 years old now and have this strange feeling in my gut every time I visit this site or see an old email or post about a video game I used to play. It's an uncomfortable combination of nostalgia, sadness, and shock at how fast years seem to fly by. On that last point, I always have this sinking feeling when I get reminded of a game I used to play (Dragon Age: Origins and Baldur's Gate were recent ones) and then realize how long ago it was that I played and enjoyed those games. This might be something that only the older people on here may relate to, but it's something that happens to me often and tugs at my heart in a strange way. In some sense, I believe that those games are time markers that relate to a part of my life (I was only 20 years old when Baldur's gate came out!?), but they also make me yearn for a time in my life when I actually had the TIME to play video games for more than an hour every month or two. I imagine those of you with kids feel this sensation even harder than I do. I've been working on my life these past 8 years (which I have not regret about) and have dabbled back into games on and off during that time. I can't IMAGINE though sitting down to a game like Baldur's Gate again and actually being able to get through it and enjoy it. That makes me sad. I don't even really have any friends that play games or especially know games that I used to play back in the day that still give me such great memories. I had some friends back in my old state and job that used to get together for some Battlefield 4 and then most recently BF1. BF1 lasted about 3-4 months for us and then it waned.

I don't even really know what I'm trying to say with this post or if it even belongs in this sub-forum. Maybe I think I'm just trying to reach out to fellow former gamers my age that have felt this same uneasy feeling as you've gotten older. Maybe the broader sense and feeling is what most normal people recognize as getting older in general and becoming hyper aware of the shockingly fast passage of time. Sometimes I'll read my old posts from 5, 6, 7, 8 years ago and fondly remember caring about and putting quality time into gaming. Sometimes I'm scared that I really have outgrown games and it would never be the same anyway. There's a guy I talked to about the dream of having 6 months off of life so that I could go back and replay some of my favorite games from the old days, and maybe burn through some games in the backlog that I've always wanted to try. But maybe I wouldn't even want to once I did have the time. Who knows. Whatever the case, games will always hold a very dear and nostalgic place in my heart.

Yes... and no. I think what you’re going through is part of the process of maturing, as an individual, and, in part, “getting old”. I don’t mean that in the bad sense (I’m 36), but in the sense that you start looking at things for what they are and have grown past the age of following the latest trend and pursuing entertainment as a form of “occupation”.

I remember seeing that anything (technological) that you experience and learn before you’re 35 (or so) is cognitively embraced by your brain and becomes part of your nature, and after that it becomes stuff “that kids these days do/use” (I need to find this quote). As part of that, you develop a lot stronger nostalgia. The problem with nostalgia is that it’s heavily biased and colored. The games that you *used* to play, especially at a different stage of your life, now hold a level of pleasure and satisfaction in your memory that newer games can’t achieve (this has to do with how our brain stores pleasurable memories). You become disenchanted with current trends/games, and nothing seems to reach that level of pleasure you had years ago. Even going back and revisiting some of those games won’t restore that because part of the pleasure was bound to that time/stage of your life, not just the game itself.

Another huge thing is how, as you age, the value of things changes from pursuit of pleasure and satisfaction to legacy and “mark in the world”. It’s pretty normal and a good thing, really...

All this to say: what you’re going through isn’t odd or a sad thing. It’s part of the human process of maturing and aging. It just tends to happen at a later stage in life nowadays (late 30s), which coincides with some changes in the wiring of your brain as well... Go back a few centuries (maybe decades only!) and you were a grown adult by the time you hit 16 or so. You’d have to face adulthood for about 20 years before all that crazy stuff started triggering in your brain. Now it all happens at pretty much the same time...

If games no longer bring you satisfaction, maybe it’s time to move on from games. On that same note, if the reason why you play games is to socialize or use some part of your brain that doesn’t normally get stimulated, than do it in moderation, and never force trying to enjoy games like you did 5-10-20 years ago.

Congratulations: you’re now a mature adult! ;)

Blameless 04-04-2018 10:25 AM

I can still play games I like and enjoy them for protracted periods of time. Truly good games are nearly timeless, and I still regularly enjoy games that are more than twenty years old at this point. I don't imagine that I'll ever be "too old" (in my mid-30s now) for video games, but I do get the feeling that many recent video games are too new for me. Many current gaming trends (games being tied to limited distribution platforms/services, excessive DRM, DLC, rapid product cycles, overly derivative content, et al) actively annoy me and I'm becoming evermore alienated from mainstream gaming culture.

Newest game I regularly play is Elite: Dangerous and I can look at lists of "top 100 most anticipated games" and not have much desire to touch any of them. Still game more than most people though, most of the games are just older than many gamers.

As for time seeming to pass more rapidly, I get that. I've gone back to some projects (gaming related and otherwise) that I've been working on, only to realize the last time I touched them was ten or fifteen years ago.

christoph 04-04-2018 10:31 AM

is not only that we getting older and slowly leaving the video games, it all has to do with the companies that NOW is all about money, they put no effort and making a video game with a good story and good enough visuals, you know a game with good graphics but not that you can't play it with your current PC, now is all about micro transactions;

I been playing video games my whole life, and I remember playing Resident evil 4 in the play, and jumping to Stalker COP (I played many games between them of course) and saying "oh man this games are great" and right after I finished Stalker I jumped to Fallout 3 ( I did not play them when they where release) and man, Fallout 3 was the best game ever for me (yeah, yeah you can say whatever you want, that the game is broken blah blah blah) and now where is Resident evil? Stalker? I wish they made another stalker, Metro was a real good game and actually looking forward to Metro exodus

jclafi 04-04-2018 10:31 AM

Ask youself this question, why do we live ?

Don´t we live to enjoy what we like ? Some people like to play soccer, baseball, golf, we like to play games. It´s just a hobby !

See this 'age' thing does not exist! We are what we are and do what we like, that´s it !

Don´t bother with 'age', just do what makes you feel good ! Enjoy your life the way you like it !

I used to play A LOT until 35 years old. I mean a lot !

Now i´m married, go to the gim Monday to Friday, work, so don´t have much time to spend with games..

But when i can, game on !

=D

Lemondrips 04-04-2018 10:36 AM

Granted I am only 26, but definitely know what your talking about. I think the biggest downfall is nothing excites me like vanilla WoW/BC era, Guild Wars 1, Warcraft 3, and CS:Source. Most of those games are 10+ years old or aren't the same anymore. Most games you pick up now are watered down I feel or just not as good as they used to be.

Dasboogieman 04-04-2018 10:38 AM

Man, I still can't believe I played Dragon Age Origins for 3 days straight on an ancient CRT TV with the Xbox 360 in my early 20s. I read every single line of dialogue because I wasn't aware you could skip it. Nothing will ever reach the same levels of wonder and awe again. I couldn't even do the same thing for Skyrim, ME2 & ME3, hell, not even the legendary Witcher series and this was only a few years later when I graduated and had disposable income for quality PC gaming. It's been a downhill slide ever since and I find myself getting immersed more in to the "dad" activities like ARMA3, DDR4 overclocking or pickling veggies. I guess what they say is true, as you get older, it's harder for you to get a dopamine buzz from instant gratification and you gradually appreciate the stuff that takes time to age.

KC_Flip 04-04-2018 12:16 PM

Have I gotten too old for games? Nope. I still like to play when I have the time. The real question is, has a priority for gaming taken a back seat to other things? The answer to that is a resounding yes. Family, career, life in general - all of these take up a lot of time and playing games is easily pushed to the side.

To add, my desktop is 7ish years old (still running the trusty i5-2500k) with only one upgrade in that time to a GTX960. The older tech limits what I can play anyway, so I stick to the classics or games that I can play for a bit at a time - RollerCoaster Tycoon, Morrowind, Dragon Age Origins, The Witcher (still haven't played 3 due to said ancient PC), Euro/American Truck Sim (such relaxing games), Half-Life/Portal series', etc.

I'm hoping to put together a new build later this year. My daughters are 6 and 4, so it will be the first time I can really show them the process and let them help. They may not enjoy it, but just the thought of being able to include them in one of my hobbies is so much more interesting and exciting then playing games.

The Pook 04-04-2018 12:20 PM

I still enjoy gaming but my tastes of what games I like changed.

Used to be a huge fan of RPGs and racing games and now all I play really are FPSes. Even that is limited to CS:GO and PUBG when I have time to game.

corky dorkelson 04-04-2018 12:27 PM

I'm getting too old to waste copious amounts of time on games. I'm primarily playing them only with my children. Minecraft is a huge hit with us, as are the Lego games. Long gone are the days when I would sit around like a turd and just game all weekend. Life is too short for that.


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