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-   -   [TH]IBM Proves Quantum Computers Can Be Faster Than Classical Ones (https://www.overclock.net/forum/349-technology-science-news/1711254-th-ibm-proves-quantum-computers-can-faster-than-classical-ones.html)

HowHardCanItBe 10-20-2018 09:44 AM

[TH]IBM Proves Quantum Computers Can Be Faster Than Classical Ones
 
Quote:

iBM researchers have published a paper proving that quantum computers can indeed be faster than classical computers, something that has only be theorized so far.

Quantum Algorithm Shows Speed Advantage
One of the main promises of quantum computers has been that they can solve complex problems much faster than classical computers can. Classical computers typically require exponentially more resources and power as the number of variables increase.
Source

Darren9 10-20-2018 10:16 AM

So it's still just a theoretical proof? But we're close to a machine that can run it, or are we? "The proposed quantum algorithm is a suitable candidate for near-future experimental realizations", it all comes down to how near the future is. It could be a bit further away than we think.

PedalMonk 10-20-2018 11:10 AM

We are likely a decade away or more for full scale commercial use. Quantum computers probably won't replace consumer products for a very long time, if ever. Right now you have to cool the qubits down to a level to get them to "act" properly. You need big machines for that.

UltraMega 10-20-2018 11:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PedalMonk (Post 27677036)
We are likely a decade away or more for full scale commercial use. Quantum computers probably won't replace consumer products for a very long time, if ever. Right now you have to cool the qubits down to a level to get them to "act" properly. You need big machines for that.

I bet my ex girlfriends heart would make for s good quantum computing setup since its already at absolute zero.

prjindigo 10-20-2018 11:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Darren9 (Post 27676982)
So it's still just a theoretical proof? But we're close to a machine that can run it, or are we? "The proposed quantum algorithm is a suitable candidate for near-future experimental realizations", it all comes down to how near the future is. It could be a bit further away than we think.

Its "fuzzy logic" and it proved actually worthless in the 1980s and 1990s too. Just a form of hardware that can do it instead of software approximating it.

The problem is that computers are precise, and a precisely wrong answer is useless.

JackCY 10-20-2018 12:04 PM

Imprecise processing isn't useless, such as graphics, audio, etc. do not require absolute mathematical precision. It can even be advantageous to not have a mathematical precision.
Still most of the quantum computing is a hype so far with no real application being showcased. So far it also seems highly impractical and expensive.
There is a reason silicon chips with transistors are popular, they are dirt cheap to make and operate.

epic1337 10-20-2018 08:01 PM

at the moment quantum computers are mostly theoretical, their application is very specific to their design and as such can only function as an accelerator.
it would still take long before they can become a functional accelerator add-on, let alone a stand-alone processor.

HowHardCanItBe 10-20-2018 09:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by epic1337 (Post 27677574)
at the moment quantum computers are mostly theoretical, their application is very specific to their design and as such can only function as an accelerator.
it would still take long before they can become a functional accelerator add-on, let alone a stand-alone processor.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Darren9 (Post 27676982)
So it's still just a theoretical proof? But we're close to a machine that can run it, or are we? "The proposed quantum algorithm is a suitable candidate for near-future experimental realizations", it all comes down to how near the future is. It could be a bit further away than we think.

You can actually program a cloud based quantum computer.

https://quantumexperience.ng.bluemix.net/qx/editor
Although this is still in simulation stages, you can still program it. Isn't physics just amazing?
Microsoft has a programming language for quantum available for download

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/quantum/development-kit

Darren9 10-21-2018 05:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HowHardCanItBe (Post 27677672)
You can actually program a cloud based quantum computer.

https://quantumexperience.ng.bluemix.net/qx/editor
Although this is still in simulation stages, you can still program it. Isn't physics just amazing?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JhHMJCUmq28
Microsoft has a programming language for quantum available for download

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/quantum/development-kit

I've already been there and ran a Hadamard gate, and it collapsed and gave the wrong answer 25% of the time. Quantum error correction is apparently theoretically "all sorted out" but no-one has a machine with enough stable quibits to run it I don't think. I've seen a couple of estimations of 2.5 million quibits to run the Shaw algorithm (encryption breaker) with error correction, we have less than 100 quibits at the moment.

NihilOC 10-21-2018 08:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JackCY (Post 27677114)
Imprecise processing isn't useless, such as graphics, audio, etc. do not require absolute mathematical precision. It can even be advantageous to not have a mathematical precision.
Still most of the quantum computing is a hype so far with no real application being showcased. So far it also seems highly impractical and expensive.
There is a reason silicon chips with transistors are popular, they are dirt cheap to make and operate.

Tbf quantum computing is not really intended as a replacement to silicon, but it's very good for things like climate/physical modelling or defeating encryption.


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