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Industrial 11-02-2004 09:19 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by NoAffinity
All right guys, I ran some tests, found my initial thought that there was no difference in performance between 4:5 and 1:1 were incorrect, and have charted the results (and amended the guide). As you can see, the difference between 1:1 and 4:5 in anything but bandwidth benchies is negligible. And, of course, higher FSB 1:1 offers the best performance, compared to a lower CPU clock in 4:5. So here it is:

Why does that show up 133mhz and 166mhz FSB. That means its a 533mhz (OC to 664) board, right?

NoAffinity 11-03-2004 10:01 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Industrial
Why does that show up 133mhz and 166mhz FSB. That means its a 533mhz (OC to 664) board, right?
What are you referring to? The system bus speeds tested were 133 mhz FSB and 166 mhz FSB. 133 is the stock system bus speed that a 533 mhz FSB CPU uses. This also produces DDR speeds of 266 mhz. Running 166 mhz FSB put the 2.53 used for testing at 3.154 GHz, and creates DDR speeds of 333 mhz.

Was that your question?

fourstar77 11-03-2004 02:51 PM

I dont get the 1:1 idea, other than I think I understand that it is your FSB compared to the mhz rate of your ram. How do you up the mhz that your ram is running on? Where is that setting?

I have AMD64 proc and an MSI Neo2 K8n Plat w/ OCZ 3700 Gold Rev. 3.

I have been adjusting the FSB, but dont see where you would up the speed of your memory.

Sorry for basic question.

Thanks



Quote:
Originally Posted by NoAffinity
ummm....it is sticky.

NoAffinity 11-03-2004 05:10 PM

RAM speed is clocked either synchronously or asynchronously with the CPU when adjusting front side bus. Some mobos list it as FSB, some list it as CPU frequency or CPU clock, but it's all the same: front side bus, which is system bus, which both CPU and RAM run on.

fourstar77 11-04-2004 10:22 AM

So I would want to look for the synchronous or asynchronous option in my bios (and set ty synchronous) to keep my OCZ 3700 Gold Rev. 3 and my MSI K8N Neo2 Plat at the same FSB speed? I think that they are at the same speed, but I will have to verify.

And then I am guessing that is where a divider comes in. If your mobo and proc can handle higher FSB but your ram is capped, you can try to adjust the divider to 5:6 or something to keep Ram at lower/its max speed and to boost the proc speed. I have heard performance is generally better at 1:1 ratio so unless the results are much better it probably is not worth it.

Just let me know if I am on the right track?

Thanks for the help.


Quote:
Originally Posted by NoAffinity
RAM speed is clocked either synchronously or asynchronously with the CPU when adjusting front side bus. Some mobos list it as FSB, some list it as CPU frequency or CPU clock, but it's all the same: front side bus, which is system bus, which both CPU and RAM run on.

NoAffinity 11-04-2004 11:07 AM

Yes, you are on the right track. If you do not have a listing specifically for a divider, then DRAM frequency or RAM speed (or however you BIOS lists it) will determine the divider, based on the CPU's FSB and the speed you set RAM to. I.E., if you have a 266 mhz FSB CPU, then a corresponding RAM speed of DDR266 will give you 1:1 operation. If you have a 400 mhz FSB CPU, then the RAM set to DDR400 speeds will give you 1:1 operation.

Industrial 11-04-2004 12:28 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by NoAffinity
What are you referring to? The system bus speeds tested were 133 mhz FSB and 166 mhz FSB. 133 is the stock system bus speed that a 533 mhz FSB CPU uses. This also produces DDR speeds of 266 mhz. Running 166 mhz FSB put the 2.53 used for testing at 3.154 GHz, and creates DDR speeds of 333 mhz.

Was that your question?
I was just confused becasue I thought you were doing all that to your computer and it looks to be far more powerful then 533mhz FSB. I guess I should have just asked if that was your computer or not. sorry

Flattit4 11-14-2004 05:28 PM

NoAffinity can u tell me how long the test for prime 95 cause i been test from yesterday morning untill now it's only 1.72%???

NoAffinity 11-15-2004 10:03 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Industrial
I was just confused becasue I thought you were doing all that to your computer and it looks to be far more powerful then 533mhz FSB. I guess I should have just asked if that was your computer or not. sorry
Oh...I was using a 2.53 GHz Northwood (533 mhz FSB CPU) for those tests, because 800 mhz FSB CPU's don't have a divider available to run the RAM faster than the CPU.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Flattit4
NoAffinity can u tell me how long the test for prime 95 cause i been test from yesterday morning untill now it's only 1.72%???
The general consensus is if you can run Prime continuously for 24 hours, then you're stable as a rock. I'm not completely sure about "1.72%", but I would assume that means the total Prime run has gone through completely once, and 72% of a second run.

Flattit4 11-15-2004 03:55 PM

Quote:
The general consensus is if you can run Prime continuously for 24 hours, then you're stable as a rock. I'm not completely sure about "1.72%", but I would assume that means the total Prime run has gone through completely once, and 72% of a second run.
what do you mean is if my cloking is no stabel after i run the prime it's gone fix the cpu to make it stabel its that right? anyway what is prime for?


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