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Discussion Starter #1
For those wanting a more detailed story, I posted about it here: http://www.overclock.net/forum/26780369-post2387.html

But in short, I I have an older Gen case, on which the side only has holes for 180mm fans, I'm wondering if anyone knows of other quality-made high static pressure 180mm fans besides those made by Silverstone. I haven't had any issues with the Silverstone fans (but they are coming up on 4 years old so I'm expecting them to fail soon), just wanting to consider my options.

Right now, I'm pretty much only looking at these two, as the only other ones I've found look cheap/rinky-dinky & I don't wanna spend money on something that won't last:

Black 180mm Silverstone: https://smile.amazon.com/SilverStone-Penetrator-Channeling-18018032mm-AP181/dp/B003RRY9SC/

White 180mm Silverstone: https://smile.amazon.com/Silverstone-Penetrator-2000rpm-Channeling-AP182/dp/B008VQ2Y2M/
 

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I don't think anyone makes 180mm fans except Silverstone, at least I've never come across any (outside of 12V automotive radiator fans).
I bought the Silverstone 180mm fans that have dual ball bearings, they're rated at 50,000 hours:

Model No. SST-AP182
Color White
Bearing Dual ball bearing
Connectors 3pin
Rated Voltage 12V DC
Start Voltage 11V (w/ fan control at lowest rpm)
9V (w/ fan control at highest rpm)
Rated Current 0.05A (500rpm) ~1.3A (2000rpm)
Rated Power 0.6W (500rpm)~15.6W (2000rpm)
Speed 500 ~ 2000rpm
Airflow 60CFM (500rpm) / 80CFM (700rpm) / 130CFM (1200rpm) / 170CFM (2000rpm)
Effective Airflow Range 1.2M (700rpm) / 3M (1200rpm) / 4.5M (2000rpm)
Static Pressure 0.7mmH2O (500rpm) / 1.1mmH2O (700rpm) / 2.45mmH2O (1200rpm) / 6.1mmH2O (2000rpm) [.240"-H2O]
Air Speed 1.9m/s ; 3.1m/s (measured at fan exit)
Noise Level 17dBA (500rpm) / 18dBA (700rpm) / 34dBA (1200rpm)
Life Time 50,000 hours
Dimension 180mm (L) x 180mm (W) x 32mm (H)
7.09" (L) x 7.09" (W) x 1.26" (H)
Weight 431g
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I don't think anyone makes 180mm fans except Silverstone, at least I've never come across any (outside of 12V automotive radiator fans).
I bought the Silverstone 180mm fans that have dual ball bearings, they're rated at 50,000 hours:
Those are the white ones right? Did you ever have the black ones before that and if so is the airflow difference to the new ones noticeable?
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)

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Just buy a 120mm 120v 60Hz AC fan and make a baffle to fit around it to fill the rest of the hole. You can use a rheostat socket to control the speed and it'll move about 20x the air of any 12v DC fan without putting any load on the power supply. The AC fans are far more efficient than *any* of the DC fans on the market and can produce high static pressures with exceptionally good turbulence.

Turbulence is what cools the motherboard and cards in the case, not total flow or pressure.
 

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Yeah I don't think they'd fit cuz it's 3 all right next to each other, this is what the side of my case looks like when it's off lol the empty space has nothing to blow on or I'd be running 4:
Really, the Silverstone fans are still the best fans for the job. You could maybe mount up several 120mm or 140mm fans together instead, but I don't think it would improve airflow or lower replacement costs.

Actually 12V 180mm to 200mm fans have been manufactured for more than ten years for automotive radiator applications.
Electric fans on car radiators date back at least 40 if not 50 years.

Just buy a 120mm 120v 60Hz AC fan and make a baffle to fit around it to fill the rest of the hole. You can use a rheostat socket to control the speed and it'll move about 20x the air of any 12v DC fan without putting any load on the power supply. The AC fans are far more efficient than *any* of the DC fans on the market and can produce high static pressures with exceptionally good turbulence.

Turbulence is what cools the motherboard and cards in the case, not total flow or pressure.
No idea what your source is, but turbulence in airflow has few if any benefits and does not cool anything. Turbulence disrupts smooth airflow and lowers the amount of air supply we are flowing to them as well as mixes warmed air coming off of components with cool air. While turbulence does all kinds of negative things, I know of no positive effects turbulence has in our applications.
 

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If I were you, I'd get a different case lol.

Seriously though, I'd just get the AP181s unless you need the extra airflow the AP182s provide and you can put up with the accompanied noise. The AP182 is basically a faster ap181. Same design, but the AP182 has a more robust motor. Silverstone also has some slimmer varieties they came out with recently.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
If I were you, I'd get a different case lol.

Seriously though, I'd just get the AP181s unless you need the extra airflow the AP182s provide and you can put up with the accompanied noise. The AP182 is basically a faster ap181. Same design, but the AP182 has a more robust motor. Silverstone also has some slimmer varieties they came out with recently.
Nah m8, I'm rocking this case til it's time for a new build and I'm buying the newer version of it when I replace it. Airflow in this thing is excellent, dual PSU capable, tons of space, no sharp edges, all black everything.
 

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If I were you, I'd get a different case lol.

Seriously though, I'd just get the AP181s unless you need the extra airflow the AP182s provide and you can put up with the accompanied noise. The AP182 is basically a faster ap181. Same design, but the AP182 has a more robust motor. Silverstone also has some slimmer varieties they came out with recently.
That and better bearings which... I'm not so sure in a FT05 or FT02 because it's horizontal... but I have two AP181s pulled out from a FT05 and they have their accompanying controller :p It's a excellent fan.
No 200mm fans come close to it and certainly no 180mm fans either

even though there's a phobya 180mm and EK 180mm fan those are quite low quality

Noctua does have their new 200mm, with 180mm mounting.

Dont know if that would work in your situation though.

https://www.amazon.com/Noctua-NF-A20-PWM-premium-quality-quiet/dp/B071SLFBNY
As much as noctua is praised, the A20 is nowhere near as good as the AP181
 

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U sure about that dave?

The A20s are more noise optimized than the AP series. While they don't spin up as high, they perform better than the APs when they're at the same rpms in both noise and airflow. Unless you're talking about absolute performance, which is where Silverstone obviously leads with it's rpm (and accompanied noise) advantage, the noctuas are the better fan.

I don't want to recommend them for HoneyBadger because even though they have a variety of mounting holes, I'm not sure if they can physically fit on the side panel. It would be like putting 2x140mm fans with 120mm mounting holes in 2x 120mm fan mounts.
 

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GamerNexus found all three 180mm / 200mm fans they tested to be very similar with Silverstone AP181 being their recommended 180mm fan.

Steve says:
"Because we pulled the SilverStone AP181 out of the Raven case, we only tested the fan at its preconfigured 100% setting – 1300RPM – and preconfigured 65-70% setting, or 800RPM. At 800RPM, which is the same as the Noctua and Cooler Master fans at max, we measured 420LPM airflow, versus, roughly the same measurement from Noctua. These measurements are within margin of error of one another, and can be thought of as functionally equal."
Relevant graph here

Steve goes on to say:
"Noise levels are fairly straight forward: The SilverStone fan operates at 44.5dBA under its maximum RPM of 1300, with roughly a 34dBA at 800RPM. This matches it near the Noctua and Cooler Master fans at the same 800RPM – or 100% RPM, for those two. Although objectively louder at max RPM, the SilverStone fan can push better noise-normalized performance, and has more headroom for bursting fan speeds under heavier loads."
Graph here, but it is in percent fan speed, not rpm, so not of much use.


https://www.gamersnexus.net/guides/3229-revisiting-the-best-200mm-fan-silverstone-ap-180mm

Thermalbench tested many 180mm fans but all his testing was well before NF-A20 was released.



http://thermalbench.com/2015/06/18/silverstone-fm181-180mm-fan/3/
 

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U sure about that dave?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tXsUdK05Nyw

The A20s are more noise optimized than the AP series. While they don't spin up as high, they perform better than the APs when they're at the same rpms in both noise and airflow. Unless you're talking about absolute performance, which is where Silverstone obviously leads with it's rpm (and accompanied noise) advantage, the noctuas are the better fan.

I don't want to recommend them for HoneyBadger because even though they have a variety of mounting holes, I'm not sure if they can physically fit on the side panel. It would be like putting 2x140mm fans with 120mm mounting holes in 2x 120mm fan mounts.
It's not just about the airflow, these silverstone fans are a lot more flexible (instead of being limited to an paltry 800rpm or less) and their static pressure is better.
Also, technically the FM181 is a better fan if you don't need focused airflow like the silverstone cases help out with, that has the same impeller as the AP181

Just as well, the A20 is a full 12 GBP more than the AP181 which is really the only place you can get the AP181 reasonably

https://www.overclockers.co.uk/silv...netrator-180mm-fan-700-1200rpm-fg-001-sv.html
https://www.overclockers.co.uk/noctua-nf-a20-pwm-200mm-800rpm-fan-fg-05r-nc.html

(for reference, AP181 is 20$ here and A20 costs a whopping 40$)
 

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Their static pressure is higher because they spin nearly twice as fast. Not to mention that whatever static pressure advantages it has is wasted when you're brute forcing fresh air on the components from the side panel (read- very short distance traveled). These fans aren't being put on radiators either.

Someone would also argue that you get what you pay for on the a20. Noctua tends to bundle a lot more than a fan, and they use good bearings. DBBs can get pretty noisy in my experiences. The A20 also has PWM. The AP18x series fans have also been out a lot longer, while the A20 came out not too long ago, so when you combine those three factors with Noctua's usual premium price, it doesn't surprise me that they cost more. Fans larger than 140mm are pretty niche as well, and that will natural attract a niche price.
 

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Their static pressure is higher because they spin nearly twice as fast. Not to mention that whatever static pressure advantages it has is wasted when you're brute forcing fresh air on the components from the side panel (read- very short distance traveled). These fans aren't being put on radiators either.

Someone would also argue that you get what you pay for on the a20. Noctua tends to bundle a lot more than a fan, and they use good bearings. DBBs can get pretty noisy in my experiences. The A20 also has PWM. The AP18x series fans have also been out a lot longer, while the A20 came out not too long ago, so when you combine those three factors with Noctua's usual premium price, it doesn't surprise me that they cost more. Fans larger than 140mm are pretty niche as well, and that will natural attract a niche price.
True, the static pressure rating is at full speed, but even at 800rpm my money is on Silverstones' having higher pressure rating .. and higher pressure rating means they can overcome vent grill and probably filter restrictions with much more airflow than A20 can. Static pressure rating or not, the Silverstone are at least as good as A20. Biggest drawback to me is not being PWM and high power requirement means they are not as easily used in many systems.

I agree, 140mm are best all-around fan size to be dealing with in this day and age .. (120mm are still good too) so not having to worry about 180/200mm mounting & power requirements.
 

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Just keep in mind that on that gamers nexus test mentioned above, that they were tested with a mesh grill, much like on honeybadger's side panel. Doesn't take much static pressure to overcome a grill. Its the stuff in front of the grill that will pose a problem. And if there was an obstruction before or after the grill, then 120mm or 140mm fans with inherently better static pressure characteristics may be the wiser choice.
 

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Just keep in mind that on that gamers nexus test mentioned above, that they were tested with a mesh grill, much like on honeybadger's side panel. Doesn't take much static pressure to overcome a grill. Its the stuff in front of the grill that will pose a problem. And if there was an obstruction before or after the grill, then 120mm or 140mm fans with inherently better static pressure characteristics may be the wiser choice.
Absolutely, 140mm fans are the best tradeoffs given you don't block off the whole front panel and have a tiny gap at the side like some stupid cases these days.
 
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