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Discussion Starter #1
I recently got myself an Ryzen 2700x system which looks a bit like this:

  • Ryzen 2700x
  • Noctua NH-D15 SE-AM4 Cooler
  • X470 GAMING M7 AC
  • F4-3200C14D-32GTZ
  • RTX 2070
  • View 71 Case
I made a post on Reddit and one of the posters told me to visit here, because this is about performance and I would like thoughts on my performance results. Here is how I am set up.

Everything in the X470 Gaming M7 AC bios is default except:


  1. Precision Boost Overdrive set to 'Enabled'
  2. CPU voltage set to 1.3v
  3. Memory timings set to 'fast' via Ryzen Memory Calc
With this setup I get these results:



In HWInfo64, the motherboard sensors, the 'Vcore' displays as 1.312V current and minimum with the maximum displaying 1.352V. It is set explicitly to 1.3V in bios and displays as such everywhere else. Running Cinebench I do see it rise from 1.312V to 1.352V. When set to default voltages it displays 1.44V.

With BCLK 102 I get these results:



I have not kept this BCLK OC for day-to-day use. Time to use this machine as normal.

The userbenchmark.com results sit at position 4 (for the first results) and the second result made a few hours ago, should be at position 2 but is not showing yet.

Does anyone have any thoughts on these results based on how the system is set up? Some on Reddit found the results to be surprising.

I am glad to now have a 2700x and I am really enjoying the new system. I am also looking forward to the possibility of an upgraded CPU without a new socket and board in 2019.
 

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When using PBO, I was under the assumption that one was supposed to leave the Core Voltage on "Auto".

Those Cinebench scores appear extremely high for a non-overclocked 2700X.

I have an MSI X470 gaming pro carbon, and also noticed a discrepancy in the Vcore voltage reading between what I have set in Bios, and what HWInfo64 shows. Setting the Vcore to 1.425 in bios results in HWinfo64 showing 1.433V. The same applies for Ram Voltage as well. Setting ram voltage to 1.4V in bios, but shows up as 1.409 in HWinfo64. I brought this up in another thread but never received a through answer.
 

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I think that's the highest scores I've seen using PBO and not manual clocks. About 100 points above my scores and (1860-1875 usually) those usually line up with others, or abit above. Weird.


That's usually the score you see when using a manual clock around 4.2ghz.



What RAM timings do you use?
What kind of cooling?
 

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I think that's the highest scores I've seen using PBO and not manual clocks. About 100 points above my scores and (1860-1875 usually) those usually line up with others, or abit above. Weird.


That's usually the score you see when using a manual clock around 4.2ghz.



What RAM and timings do you use?
What kind of cooling?

Does PBO oc all cores at same speed like 4.3GHz?
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
F4-3200C14D-32gtz at 14-14-14-28 (Ryzen Memory Calculator 'fast' timings)
Noctua NH-D15 SE-AM4 cooler.
Set CPU Voltage to 1.3V in MSI M7 AC bios. Enable PBO and that is it. Cinebench 1960+.
I have even set the CPU Voltage to 1.2875V earlier today, that ran even cooler.
I will post updated results later.
 

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All cores will boost... With my cooling and a -.1 voltage offset, rendering/ synthetic tasks boost all cores to 4.1 or 4.0 GHz (closer to 4.1 - but after heat soak in Intel Burn Test, they creep back down to 4 GHz).

"Lightly threaded" loads 4.2 GHz on the utilized cores. One or two threads, peaks up to 4.35 GHz.

I wouldn't mind running manual voltage, but offset really saves power, down to like .7 volts on low-use cores. PBO even with the offset shoots up the voltage to 1.4 to 1.45... Without offset, up to 1.55v.

I did an IBT run at 4.2 GHz locked at 1.4V, and my power consumption jumped by 70 Watts at the wall compared to just using PBO. Could I lower the Voltage, probably, but I just wanted to do a quick run since I'm spec'ing out a new PSU.
 

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I don't get how you achieve that score with PBO. What do your cores boost to during the test?


I get around 1860 +-10 with PBO and can achieve ~2000 with manual clocks as a reference. That seems to be in line with other benches I've seen.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
I don't get how you achieve that score with PBO. What do your cores boost to during the test?


I get around 1860 +-10 with PBO and can achieve ~2000 with manual clocks as a reference. That seems to be in line with other benches I've seen.
Here is a mobile camera shot of the CPU-Z run (apologies for bad quality, it was off a tablet):

https://i.imgur.com/m72lVV4.jpg

You can see all cores boosting to 4.43GHz and gave this result.


Today I took the BCLK even higher to 103.

I set:

Led to results:

userbenchmark.com

So just to recap. My settings for these results were:

  • PBO Enabled
  • BCLK 103
  • CPU Core Voltage 1.35V
  • Memory timings from Ryzen Memory Calculator of 'fast' for kit (F4-3200C14D-32gtz).
That's it, no setting of core frequencies or anything else. This is why I am posting to see if others get similar results.
 

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On this machine it does. All cores show as boosting consistently.
All cores will boost... With my cooling and a -.1 voltage offset, rendering/ synthetic tasks boost all cores to 4.1 or 4.0 GHz (closer to 4.1 - but after heat soak in Intel Burn Test, they creep back down to 4 GHz).

I did an IBT run at 4.2 GHz locked at 1.4V, and my power consumption jumped by 70 Watts at the wall compared to just using PBO. Could I lower the Voltage, probably, but I just wanted to do a quick run since I'm spec'ing out a new PSU.
I can't imagine if say the 3700X with all its cores boosting to 4.5GHz. Wow.
 

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I think that next gen Ryzen will have 4.7GHz and 5GHz in reach.
We shall see... I doubt it though... because of the new node, boosting might behave very differently than Ryzen 1 and 2.
 

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I think that next gen Ryzen will have 4.7GHz and 5GHz in reach.

How's the 2700X handling the GTX 2070?


Wait, your ram is only at 3200. At 3466 Cl14 should add 30 more points in Cine. Spills over to games as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
How's the 2700X handling the GTX 2070?

Wait, your ram is only at 3200. At 3466 Cl14 should add 30 more points in Cine. Spills over to games as well.
It handles it very easily. I have my GPU on default settings. I got about 15% extra out of it when I did an OC, but to be honest, I did not notice the difference. Although I game, I use my machine for dev work also.

My memory is a dual rank 2x16GB kit. It will not OC as easily as 2x8GB single rank kits. It has been optimised with 'fast' timings using Ryzen Memory Calculator.

This is my fastest memory run: https://www.userbenchmark.com/UserRun/13468774 (126%, the current top score is 122%, only first run is listed with userbenchmark.)

I will try 3466 and post back results.
 

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Yeah, for the past week or so having Ryzen, I've been too focused on core clock instead of getting my RAM past 3200 CL14. The tl;dr with PBO overclocking is to keep it cool and reduce the voltage. Going from a -.1 to a -.11 voltage offset nets me a small gain in performance since it keeps the heat lower. Any LLC even adds a little heat that harms performance. PBO is too aggressive with boost voltages. I want to pull it down more, but the idle voltage drops too much; so in an odd twist, getting stability at idle is harder than under load... Although I could just run a constant voltage 24/7.

Maybe using Ryzen Master to configure PBO is better than using the "on/off" settings in the newest AGESA BIOS options???
 

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It handles it very easily. I have my GPU on default settings. I got about 15% extra out of it when I did an OC, but to be honest, I did not notice the difference. Although I game, I use my machine for dev work also.

My memory is a dual rank 2x16GB kit. It will not OC as easily as 2x8GB single rank kits. It has been optimised with 'fast' timings using Ryzen Memory Calculator.

This is my fastest memory run: https://www.userbenchmark.com/UserRun/13468774 (126%, the current top score is 122%, only first run is listed with userbenchmark.)

I will try 3466 and post back results.

Don't sweat it. 3200 is fine so long as your cpu clocks well and it does.

Yeah, for the past week or so having Ryzen, I've been too focused on core clock instead of getting my RAM past 3200 CL14. The tl;dr with PBO overclocking is to keep it cool and reduce the voltage. Going from a -.1 to a -.11 voltage offset nets me a small gain in performance since it keeps the heat lower. Any LLC even adds a little heat that harms performance. PBO is too aggressive with boost voltages. I want to pull it down more, but the idle voltage drops too much; so in an odd twist, getting stability at idle is harder than under load... Although I could just run a constant voltage 24/7.

Maybe using Ryzen Master to configure PBO is better than using the "on/off" settings in the newest AGESA BIOS options???
I think cpu oc is still king even with Ryzen. That PBO really works. Instead of just boosting to 4.1 - 4.2, that 4.3 makes a hell of a lot difference.
 

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