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I cannot for the life of me seem to get 4.4Ghz single core boost clock out of my 3700X. I tried testing with cinebench R20 and watching HWiNFO while running the single core bench, and it simply won't push to it. Closest I get is 4.35Ghz.

I have tried:
Clearing CMOS
enabling PBO
Tried it with it PBO "Auto"
Ryzen Balanced Power Plan
Ryzen High Performance
Updating bios and chipset to latest

I am wondering if its my motherboard, I am also wondering if this is normal behavior?

Specs:
Ryzen 3700X
Asus TUF B450M-Plus Gaming
16gb 3000MHz
Stock Wraith Prism Cooler

Am I being overly critical about this? Is this normal behavior? Is my stock cooler keeping me down? Could it be the motherboard?

Just for the record, every thing else runs smoothly, I am just trying to get advertised boost clocks.
 

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9 Cans of Ravioli
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you won't see it unless you're idle at the desktop with nothing running.

a single threaded test might only work one thread but you still have Windows doing Windows-y things on the other 7 cores. As far as the CPU is concerned that means it's not working on a single thread workload.

it's been an "issue" since day one:

https://www.extremetech.com/computing/297762-survey-many-amd-ryzen-3000-cpus-dont-hit-full-boost-clock

https://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-ryzen-3000-not-hitting-advertised-boost-speeds-survey,40291.html

https://www.pcgamesn.com/amd/ryzen-3000-boost-clock-failure

https://venturebeat.com/2019/09/04/amds-ryzen-boost-clocks-are-a-problem-but-not-for-you/
 

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It will boost one core at a time and fairly briefly. Obviously, it won't boost to that clock speed under heavy work load but it doesn't have to be idle so run a lightly threaded work load; a quick-scan in Defender works pretty well. Since it boosts pretty quickly a faster than normal polling period also helps, I use a polling period of about 500 mSec's in HWInfo. Then look at the multiplier graph for each of the cores and watch which ones boost to 4400.

This assumes you've installed the AMD chipset drivers and are running the Ryzen Balanced power plan. Also helps a lot to set Cool n Quiet, Advanced C-States, Processor CPPC and CPPC Preferred Cores all to ENABLED in BIOS if you haven't.

In truth, the actual performance gain from hitting 4400 is hard to measure and probably not much if you could. The real performance comes from maintaining moderatly elevated clock speeds...4200-4300MHz...under heavier processing loads. That usually means better (than stock) cooling to keep it from dropping back as it gets hot.
 

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Highest boost clock is also very dependent of temperature. In my sample that is from first batch, at 71c it drops all cores by 100MHz at lest, 83c by 200MHz + while at 62-65c it hits 4.398 on one core. At one time it went over 4.425GHz but later on dropped with different/newer BIOS and AGESA although benchmark scores improved.
I understand that newest 3700x batches behave better by 50-100mhz.
 

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AMD OVERLOCKER
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Why not using manual OC?

Sent from my ONEPLUS A6003 using Tapatalk
 

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Why not using manual OC?

Sent from my ONEPLUS A6003 using Tapatalk
Wouldn't get 4.4GHz with OEM cooler and even with best cooler and big win in silicone lottery even 4.35 is difficult.
 

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Wouldn't get 4.4GHz with OEM cooler and even with best cooler and big win in silicone lottery even 4.35 is difficult.
Not to mention other problems like much higher potential for degradation operating with a fixed voltage/multiplier and probable loss of single threaded performance if not done really carefully even when using a CPU that's a winner in the silicon lottery.

Speaking of being a winner: mine's not one and as well it's an early-lot 3700X (bought in July of '19) so it's definitely not benefiting from improvement due to process maturity. I tweaked PBO on my B450m Mortar using the "EDC=1" bug: it took some doing but it will boost to 4425 on three cores and 4400 on three others pretty reliably in lightly threaded workloads. As I said before the actual benefit to performance isn't really noticeable nor measurable in benchmarks, it's just kinda nice to see it boosting that way.
 

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AMD OVERLOCKER
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Wouldn't get 4.4GHz with OEM cooler and even with best cooler and big win in silicone lottery even 4.35 is difficult.
Wow that's unfortunate.
My 3600x was fine at 4.4ghz with the stock cooler and it was good enough for benchmarks etc. For daily use, I leave it with stock boost that can push the cores till 4.3ghz easily with offset max voltage of 1.3v.
With watercooling I can see 4.550-4.590mhz which is ok only for some benchmarks at 1.46v.

So I guess your CPU is just a mediocre piece, that's all.

Sent from my ONEPLUS A6003 using Tapatalk
 

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Probably can if you disable SMT, that reduces heat density a lot.
Main goal of OC is to increase performance, not to lower it, Disabling SMT and only in case some substantial OC is achieved would only marginally increase single core performance.
 

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Disabling SMT will increase lightly threaded performance(like games) at the expense of productivity type workloads. Disabling SMT on my 3600 allows me to overclock 75-100mhz higher, the 3700x has 4 cores/ccx so greater heat density so the difference would be 100mhz+ more with smt disabled.
 

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I see the same with my 3700X. At best with PBO I see 4.375GHz single core across 3-4 threads using an ASUS C8H board. I prefer to do an all core oc of 4.4GHz with 1.3v on vcore, stable in everything I do (gaming, media, Internet) except handbrake which I only use once or twice a month so no issue dropping clock speed to 4.3GHz for an hour or so to run handbrake. Of course prime95 is a no-go but I don't care about it.
 

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I see the same with my 3700X. At best with PBO I see 4.375GHz single core across 3-4 threads using an ASUS C8H board. I prefer to do an all core oc of 4.4GHz with 1.3v on vcore, stable in everything I do (gaming, media, Internet) except handbrake which I only use once or twice a month so no issue dropping clock speed to 4.3GHz for an hour or so to run handbrake. Of course prime95 is a no-go but I don't care about it.
Yup, same procedure for me.


In order to get my 3700X reliably running @4.4 GHz on upto all cores permanently was to set the multiplier to 44 in the BIOS and then reducing the VCore to a comfortable value (Starting at 1,322V and ending up at 1,268V).
I didn't touch/disable any safety features, CStates or really anything else, except the fan curve for a more silent setting after the fact.

If I check the Clockspeeds with CPU-Z or HWMonitor, it seems that the processor is locked at 4.4 GHz all the time.
But if I check more in depth with HWInfo64 I can see that the effective Clocks idle down all the way to 15 MHz when not under load.

Anyways. If you guys wanna check, that was my approach:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Specs
CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 3700X
CPU-Cooler: Noctua NH-D15
Mobo: Gigabyte B550 Aorus Pro AC
Memory: 4x8 GB GSkill Aegis 3200/16/18/18/38/56 @1,35V (XMP-Profile)
PSU: Corsair RM750
GPU: GeForce GTX 980 (waiting for next gen)

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Start:
VCore-set CinebenchR20 7Zip/32MB/1min Furmark/1min 3DMark CPU-Z Timespy

1,322V 5239 P - 81,5°C 74,1°C 77,3°C 2737 P - 66,6°C 5938,5 / 537,7 - 79,8°C 10855 P - 36,47 FPS (4468 GPU)
1,304V 5256 P - 80,0°C 73,1°C 75,8°C 6974 P - 62,3°C 5929,4 / 537,4 - 77,4°C 10822 P - 36,36 FPS (4460 GPU)
1,280V 5297 P - 78,6°C 71,5°C 74,0°C 6973 P - 60,3°C 5924,4 / 537,0 - 75,8°C 10701 P - 35,95 FPS (4443 GPU)
1,250V 5259 P - 75,8°C 70,5°C 72,0°C 6976 P - 60,0°C 5928,2 / 537,1 - 73,9°C 10822 P - 36,36 FPS (4458 GPU)
1,220V PC-CRASH
1,232V Software-CRASH
1,238V Software-CRASH
1,244V Software-CRASH
1,250V Software-CRASH
1,256V 5250 P - 75,3°C 70,0°C 72,3°C 7034 P - 57,5°C 5919,4 / 353,5 - 74,5°C 10829 P - 36,38 FPS (4464 GPU)
1,274V 5265 P - 78,3°C
1,268V 5251 P - 76,9°C 71,0°C 73,6°C - 5925,9 / 538,0 - 73,3°C

End

Temperature Stresstest @1,268V à 10 min each

7Zip Furmark CPU-Z Prime95(large FTTs)
71,8°C 74,5°C 74,9°C 83,8°C
 

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Yup, same procedure for me.


In order to get my 3700X reliably running @4.4 GHz on upto all cores permanently was to set the multiplier to 44 in the BIOS and then reducing the VCore to a comfortable value (Starting at 1,322V and ending up at 1,268V).
I didn't touch/disable any safety features, CStates or really anything else, except the fan curve for a more silent setting after the fact.

If I check the Clockspeeds with CPU-Z or HWMonitor, it seems that the processor is locked at 4.4 GHz all the time.
But if I check more in depth with HWInfo64 I can see that the effective Clocks idle down all the way to 15 MHz when not under load.

Anyways. If you guys wanna check, that was my approach:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Specs
CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 3700X
CPU-Cooler: Noctua NH-D15
Mobo: Gigabyte B550 Aorus Pro AC
Memory: 4x8 GB GSkill Aegis 3200/16/18/18/38/56 @1,35V (XMP-Profile)
PSU: Corsair RM750
GPU: GeForce GTX 980 (waiting for next gen)

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Start:
VCore-set CinebenchR20 7Zip/32MB/1min Furmark/1min 3DMark CPU-Z Timespy

1,322V 5239 P - 81,5°C 74,1°C 77,3°C 2737 P - 66,6°C 5938,5 / 537,7 - 79,8°C 10855 P - 36,47 FPS (4468 GPU)
1,304V 5256 P - 80,0°C 73,1°C 75,8°C 6974 P - 62,3°C 5929,4 / 537,4 - 77,4°C 10822 P - 36,36 FPS (4460 GPU)
1,280V 5297 P - 78,6°C 71,5°C 74,0°C 6973 P - 60,3°C 5924,4 / 537,0 - 75,8°C 10701 P - 35,95 FPS (4443 GPU)
1,250V 5259 P - 75,8°C 70,5°C 72,0°C 6976 P - 60,0°C 5928,2 / 537,1 - 73,9°C 10822 P - 36,36 FPS (4458 GPU)
1,220V PC-CRASH
1,232V Software-CRASH
1,238V Software-CRASH
1,244V Software-CRASH
1,250V Software-CRASH
1,256V 5250 P - 75,3°C 70,0°C 72,3°C 7034 P - 57,5°C 5919,4 / 353,5 - 74,5°C 10829 P - 36,38 FPS (4464 GPU)
1,274V 5265 P - 78,3°C
1,268V 5251 P - 76,9°C 71,0°C 73,6°C - 5925,9 / 538,0 - 73,3°C

End

Temperature Stresstest @1,268V à 10 min each

7Zip Furmark CPU-Z Prime95(large FTTs)
71,8°C 74,5°C 74,9°C 83,8°C
I have pretty much the same specs as you I can not even reach 4900 on CBR20. I don't know what is wrong with my setup. With PBO Enabled or Auto I haven't pass 4866 points.
I can see in HWinfo that 4 cores can reach 4.4Ghz randomly.

Specs
CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 3700X
CPU-Cooler: Custom watercool
Mobo: MSI X570 Tomahawk
Memory: 2x16 GB GSkill TridentZ DDR4-3600MHz CL16-19-19-39 1.35V (XMP-Profile)
PSU: EVGA 1000W G2
GPU: GeForce GTX 980 (also waiting for next gen)

What shoud I try?
 

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I just got mine recently. I haven't messed with it much (so everything is at BIOS defaults except for D.O.C.P. having been set) since I'm on the stock CPU heatsink and fan, so I figured I'll wait until I upgrade that. All of this is new to me having been used to a Core i5 2500K and how those overclocked. HWInfo is new to me and has so many sensors it's like an overload; I'm used to HW Monitor. Here's what I get running the Cinebench R20 program single core but I'm not sure what to make of it. Clock speeds do appear to go up to 4.4 GHz under lower core count loads. Also important to note that AMD advertises "up to" so it's not a guarantee I suppose.

 
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